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Bar ends on fitness bikes

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Old 09-12-18, 07:08 PM
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streetlight
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Question Bar ends on fitness bikes

I hope this is best forum and that a fitness bike counts as a hybrid [Please feel free to move, moderators!] ... but why do some fitness flat-bar bikes have those bar-end grips? What are those for and why do they appear on fitness bikes, such as the Giant FastRoads?
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Old 09-12-18, 07:23 PM
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3speedslow
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Flat bars do not offer a wide range of hand positioning over long rides. Manufacturers or customers will put them on to give riders an extra hand placement option. It also helps when the rider is climbing or working hard out of the saddle.
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Old 09-12-18, 08:03 PM
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johnny99
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I have them on my flat bar mountain bike. They are very helpful when climbing. They can give you a more aero position on flat roads, but I don't advise using them at speed since your hands are farther away from the brakes.
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Old 09-13-18, 08:17 AM
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I have them on the interior of the flat bar

They are just another place to hold so my hands don't get sore. I like them here rather than one the ends because I have much faster access to the brake levers when I need them NOW. I don't have to move my hand around the grip. I just drop it down to the brake.

They don't help with hill climbs or any of that. Just just give me a different hand position so I can do long rides without my hands going numb.

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Old 09-13-18, 08:40 AM
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Road bikes are built for riding distances, with many hours in the saddle being common. On a road bike I ride 22 miles in the evenings, and 50-70 on weekends. The weekend rides take 3.5 to 5 hours. Part of the ergonomics of road bikes is the handlebar system which is designed to provide about five different positions for your hands:
  • On the uppers, but narrow, near the stem.
  • On the mid-uppers.
  • On the ramps (from the corner to the start of the hoods)
  • On the hoods (the shifters)
  • In the drops (forward in the drops)
  • On the hooks (ends of the drops)
While I mostly cruise on the hoods or drops, sometimes my hands start tingling and I have to mix it up.

On a flat-bar bike your option is the grips. That's about it. So we see aftermarket accessories to improve the ergonomics for longer rides -- bar ends, or mid-bar upright grips. I've used bar ends on my hybrid bike and like the additional option for keeping my hands happy.

It would be great to see bar-ends that extend forward just three inches and that work more like a road bike's hoods, putting the rider into a more aerodynamic position. Not tri-bars -- those are more aggressive than I would want on a hybrid, but just far enough forward to allow me to stretch out a bit on the bike and rest against my hands the way hoods allow.
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Old 09-13-18, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
.
It would be great to see bar-ends that extend forward just three inches and that work more like a road bike's hoods, putting the rider into a more aerodynamic position. Not tri-bars -- those are more aggressive than I would want on a hybrid, but just far enough forward to allow me to stretch out a bit on the bike and rest against my hands the way hoods allow.
Like that?



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Old 09-13-18, 01:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
I have them on the interior of the flat bar

They are just another place to hold so my hands don't get sore. I like them here rather than one the ends because I have much faster access to the brake levers when I need them NOW. I don't have to move my hand around the grip. I just drop it down to the brake.

They don't help with hill climbs or any of that. Just just give me a different hand position so I can do long rides without my hands going numb.

Those look very functional. What brand and model are they?
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Old 09-13-18, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Flip Flop Rider View Post
Those look very functional. What brand and model are they?
Nashbar's $12 model.

I don't see them on Nashbar right now. But this same model bar end has been available from them for years. So they are probably just updating the site. I'm sure they'll be back.

I need to wrap then in bar tape though because they are hard aluminum. Not great for holding for extended periods. But even without tape they are good for a few minutes just to get my hands off the normal grips.
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Old 09-13-18, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
Road bikes are built for riding distances, with many hours in the saddle being common. On a road bike I ride 22 miles in the evenings, and 50-70 on weekends. The weekend rides take 3.5 to 5 hours. Part of the ergonomics of road bikes is the handlebar system which is designed to provide about five different positions for your hands:
  • On the uppers, but narrow, near the stem.
  • On the mid-uppers.
  • On the ramps (from the corner to the start of the hoods)
  • On the hoods (the shifters)
  • In the drops (forward in the drops)
  • On the hooks (ends of the drops)
While I mostly cruise on the hoods or drops, sometimes my hands start tingling and I have to mix it up.

On a flat-bar bike your option is the grips. That's about it. So we see aftermarket accessories to improve the ergonomics for longer rides -- bar ends, or mid-bar upright grips. I've used bar ends on my hybrid bike and like the additional option for keeping my hands happy.

It would be great to see bar-ends that extend forward just three inches and that work more like a road bike's hoods, putting the rider into a more aerodynamic position. Not tri-bars -- those are more aggressive than I would want on a hybrid, but just far enough forward to allow me to stretch out a bit on the bike and rest against my hands the way hoods allow.
My bike is deliberately set up so that when I'm 'on the bar ends' I am in the same position as I would be on a properly fitted 'endurance' road bike on the hoods -- actually with very slightly more forward torso lean because of the wider bars. I have two main positions there: 'out' on the bar ends, or back a bit. Then there's the complete variation afforded by returning to the 'grips' position.

Has worked for me since 2010 without issue, all kinds of distances.

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Old 09-13-18, 10:33 PM
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Ergon Grip/bar ends are just a nice thing...
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Old 09-14-18, 03:53 AM
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Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
It would be great to see bar-ends that extend forward just three inches and that work more like a road bike's hoods, putting the rider into a more aerodynamic position. Not tri-bars -- those are more aggressive than I would want on a hybrid, but just far enough forward to allow me to stretch out a bit on the bike and rest against my hands the way hoods allow.
Like these?

http://bikeshed.johnhoogstrate.nl/bi...right_rear.jpg
https://www.bikehighway.com/media/ca...1774_otsi7.jpg
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Old 09-14-18, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Ergon Grip/bar ends are just a nice thing...
Agreed. I run the GP2 on my hybrid w/ cut down raised (50mm) bars. The bar ends are small enough to be comfortable for extended trips and large enough to be used for climbing hills.

As others have stated, it gives you multiple locations and positions to put your hands. This also helps to cure hand, arm, and shoulder fatigue on long rides.
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Old 09-14-18, 02:29 PM
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Sal Bandini
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I have these. They are awesome. Much better than bar ends.
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Old 09-18-18, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
Like these?

What are they called, and where did you get them. Thanks!
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Old 09-18-18, 01:05 PM
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Sal Bandini
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Originally Posted by Havana Brown View Post
What are they called, and where did you get them. Thanks!
SQLabs Innerbarends

https://www.sq-lab.com/shop/en/New-p...rends-411.html

I got mine on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 09-19-18, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by The Snowman View Post
Agreed. I run the GP2 on my hybrid w/ cut down raised (50mm) bars. The bar ends are small enough to be comfortable for extended trips and large enough to be used for climbing hills.

As others have stated, it gives you multiple locations and positions to put your hands. This also helps to cure hand, arm, and shoulder fatigue on long rides.
What I have on mine. I think I would like Skipjacks very well.
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Old 09-19-18, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by HobieKen View Post
What I have on mine. I think I would like Skipjacks very well.
Best post ever.
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Old 09-19-18, 02:06 PM
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I am interested in the idea of “ Innerbars” too. I herniated all, save one cranial vertebrae, in a car accident, leaving me with permanent nerve damage into my arms and hands. My hands frequently go numb. I have neck issues too.

As my hands may loose feeling while riding I am loath to get my hands too far from the brakes, which is one reason I do not feel comfortable with drop bars.

I am finding quite a few short endbars on Amazon, is there any specific advantage to the linked “innerbars” above? I am also having trouble locating shorter handlebars on Amazon. I have RXL SL carbon bars on the bike now, and they do offer shorter handlebars, although I am not sure at what length a shorter bar may have issues getting everything mounted? I am using a grip shifter which takes up a little extra space on the right handle.

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Old 09-19-18, 04:31 PM
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Inner vs. outer bar ends -- it's all user preference. A lot of variables contribute to your comfort with the bar ends. I have fairly wide shoulders, and I like to have my hands farther out on the bar rather than closer together. This is one reason I ride flat bars instead of drop bars -- drop bars just feel too narrow to me. This is also why I don't use inner bar ends -- I don't like the grip being that narrow -- I want more of a spread. If you're comfortable with a narrower grip, then the inner bar ends may be best for you. If you're comfortable with a wider grip, then the outer bar ends may be best for you.

Mechanical advantages of inner bar ends can include a more aerodynamic profile -- your body is narrower and probably lower as well. Mechanical disadvantages of inner bar ends can include less leverage on the handlebar/steering, since your hands are closer to it. You also can't utilize inner bar ends for climbing leverage, either. Outer bar ends are basically the inverse of this. Your body profile will be wider and possibly more upright as well, and less aerodynamic. But you have more steering leverage on the bars and more climbing leverage. Whether any of this has any impact on your ride will depend on where and how you ride, how fast you ride, your riding objectives, etc.

It may come down to simply trying both to see what you like. Or...if you don't like wider grips as much, and the only reason you don't ride drops is the low position, you can probably bet that you'll like inner bar ends. If one reason you don't like drops is the narrow profile, and you like the wider handlebar types, then you'll probably like outer bar ends.
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Old 09-20-18, 09:49 AM
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Inner bar ends have one more advantage - as can be seen on the second picture I linked to before, you can reach the brake levers with your fingers. Probably not enough for an abrupt stop, but still better then no reach at all. Of course, if the bar ends are longer and you are holding onto them further away from the handlebars, this doesn't apply.

I myself also have mounted bar ends inside grips, and am liking the concept, but will look for a bit different shaped bar ends to improve the comfort.
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Old 09-20-18, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
Inner bar ends have one more advantage - as can be seen on the second picture I linked to before, you can reach the brake levers with your fingers. Probably not enough for an abrupt stop, but still better then no reach at all. Of course, if the bar ends are longer and you are holding onto them further away from the handlebars, this doesn't apply.

I myself also have mounted bar ends inside grips, and am liking the concept, but will look for a bit different shaped bar ends to improve the comfort.
This.

And its' lightning fast for me to get my hands on the brakes in a hurry when I need to.

And since I ride my hybrid on streets with bad drivers and even dumber pedestrians who will dart out into the street in front of me no matter how many flashing lights I have on the bike, being able to hit those brakes fast is really important.
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Old 09-20-18, 11:46 AM
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I often have a finger resting on the lever while my palm is on my (outer) bar ends. I think both types of bar ends can be set up for equally fast access to the brakes.
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Old 09-20-18, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Flip Flop Rider View Post
Those look very functional. What brand and model are they?
I was tempted and ordered these when the subject came up a couple of months ago (?), but I haven't installed them: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I have bar ends that came on my Sirrus which I don't use much.
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Old 09-22-18, 12:02 PM
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I am about to test out this “inner bar” arrangement. I am thinking about ordering Ergon GP2 grips too. Ergon actually makes grips that work with Grip Shifters.

I cut the bar down to 680 too. Maybe bar tape for the metal bars?






Last edited by McMitchell; 09-22-18 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 09-24-18, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by McMitchell View Post
I am thinking about ordering Ergon GP2 grips too. Ergon actually makes grips that work with Grip Shifters.
I cut the bar down to 680 too. Maybe bar tape for the metal bars?
I cut my 50mm riser bars down from 800 to 660 and use the GP2 bar ends. It feels awesome. My arms were turned out really far when I tried the bars at full length with the bar ends.
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