Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Hybrid Bicycles
Reload this Page >

Tubeless tires on a Hybrid.

Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

Tubeless tires on a Hybrid.

Old 12-09-18, 07:40 AM
  #1  
Helderberg
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Helderberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Rolesville NC
Posts: 330

Bikes: Had an old Columbia in the 80's, here a used Schwinn hybrid, now a Cannondale Quick 7 & 3.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Tubeless tires on a Hybrid.

Can anyone give me some insight as to why tubeless tires are better on a Hybrid? From what I have read and been told at the BS if I get a puncture I can simply install a tube?
I understand the weight benefit on a road bike but does that practically exist on a hybrid?
Thanks in advance, Frank.
Helderberg is offline  
Old 12-09-18, 08:15 AM
  #2  
DowneasTTer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: North Central Florida
Posts: 721

Bikes: 2019 Canyon Roadlite 9.0 CF LTD, 2015 Giant FastRoad CoMax 1, 2001 Mongoose Pro Triomphe,

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
That's a BIG yes.. Lower tire pressures = more comfortable ride plus without the tube less rolling resistance. Not that that is a big deal riding a hybrid but still a positive. I've been running tubeless on both my wife and my Giant Fastroads. Here the thread that I started back in Sept. See the thread here:Time to upgrade our 2015 Giant Fastroad CoMax 1's

I will be going that way on our new Canyon Roadlites as soon as they need new tires as well. You can put in a tube but for any punctures that I have had other than a sliced sidewall due to glass have either sealed on there own or by use of a plug. My on board tool kit, no tubes, but plug kit and a couple of CO2 cartridges. To plug a tire if needed takes me about 2 minutes and most of that is finding the leak and getting the tool out of the bag. Wheel stays on the bike. To me the big benefit is that at nearly 70 with heart problems getting a tire off the rim to replace the tube takes too much out of me. I would rather spend my what energy I have spinning the pedals and enjoying the view.
DowneasTTer is offline  
Old 12-09-18, 08:48 AM
  #3  
Helderberg
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Helderberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Rolesville NC
Posts: 330

Bikes: Had an old Columbia in the 80's, here a used Schwinn hybrid, now a Cannondale Quick 7 & 3.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Wink

Originally Posted by DowneasTTer View Post
That's a BIG yes.. Lower tire pressures = more comfortable ride plus without the tube less rolling resistance. Not that that is a big deal riding a hybrid but still a positive. I've been running tubeless on both my wife and my Giant Fastroads. Here the thread that I started back in Sept. See the thread here:Time to upgrade our 2015 Giant Fastroad CoMax 1's

I will be going that way on our new Canyon Roadlites as soon as they need new tires as well. You can put in a tube but for any punctures that I have had other than a sliced sidewall due to glass have either sealed on there own or by use of a plug. My on board tool kit, no tubes, but plug kit and a couple of CO2 cartridges. To plug a tire if needed takes me about 2 minutes and most of that is finding the leak and getting the tool out of the bag. Wheel stays on the bike. To me the big benefit is that at nearly 70 with heart problems getting a tire off the rim to replace the tube takes too much out of me. I would rather spend my what energy I have spinning the pedals and enjoying the view.
Thank you. Have to be honest, I did not realize you had the option of plugging the tire. Sounds like a win/win as I m also 70 and do not need any more aggravating then needed.
Frank.
Helderberg is offline  
Old 12-09-18, 09:34 AM
  #4  
DowneasTTer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: North Central Florida
Posts: 721

Bikes: 2019 Canyon Roadlite 9.0 CF LTD, 2015 Giant FastRoad CoMax 1, 2001 Mongoose Pro Triomphe,

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by Helderberg View Post
Thank you. Have to be honest, I did not realize you had the option of plugging the tire. Sounds like a win/win as I m also 70 and do not need any more aggravating then needed.
Frank.
I've tried two kits both purchased off Amazon. The cheap one Genuine Innovations UST Tubeless Plug Patch Kit and the more expensive
Dynaplug MICRO PRO Bicycle Tire Puncture Repair-1 KiT with 10 Pieces one. By far the Dynaplug kit is the best. There are a few of other things to consider as well, which tire to use, valves, tape, sealant and of course maintenance of the system. However, I think once you make the jump you will not go back. The best thing for me is that so far is all my tire repair has been back in the comfort of my garage with the tools I needed and of course the beer incentive.
DowneasTTer is offline  
Old 12-09-18, 10:57 AM
  #5  
Helderberg
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Helderberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Rolesville NC
Posts: 330

Bikes: Had an old Columbia in the 80's, here a used Schwinn hybrid, now a Cannondale Quick 7 & 3.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
DowneasTTer, "the beer incentive"' I can relate. Good information about the plug kits, thanks.
Frank
Helderberg is offline  
Old 12-09-18, 06:50 PM
  #6  
Bryan C.
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 293
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 101 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Since I know you are looking at the Giant Escape disc 1 I will offer this bit of information on the stock tires. The Giant Crosscut Metro ERT tires are something that I had never seen before. The tire has an integrated tube and valve stem. The tube is filled with Stan's sealant. Installing a tube as a roadside repair with this set up would be doable but not ideal.


A more traditional tubeless tire doesn't have the integrated tube. And for what it's worth, tubeless tires aren't for everyone. If you aren't very savvy with fixing bikes a good set of puncture resistant tubes and tires might be an easier set up to manage long term.
Bryan C. is offline  
Old 12-09-18, 07:53 PM
  #7  
hokiefyd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Northern Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 2,083

Bikes: 2018 Redline Zander, 2018 Giant Roam 2, 2015 Trek Verve 3, 1997 Trek 750, 1969 Peugeot PO-18

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 707 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Bryan C, thanks for that bit about the CrossCut ERT tires? Could you also post a picture of the tread pattern on them?

My dad set a few of his bikes up tubeless a few months ago, but switched them all back to tubes. He found it to be pretty messy, pretty finnicky, and not really all that advantageous if you physically cut a tire, which is one of the threats where he rides (SW Utah...lots of rocks when off road). On the road, he's got a lot of goatheads and such to deal with. His weapon of choice is Slime/Stans in a traditional tube. This seals/heals small punctures about the same as if running tubeless, and it also allows him to boot a tire if it he slices one. Tubeless tires typically require a very tight fit on the wheel, to help seal the bead. Traditional tires are usually easier to mount/remove.

I never have tried tubeless, or even sealant in tubes. I run pretty low pressures for my weight (less than 50 psi and I weigh 240 pounds), but I'm careful how I ride and I don't pinch them flat. Any theoretical advantage of rolling resistance due to lack of tubes, and I agree there is one, will be far lost on me...a heavy rider who rides mostly gravel roads dirt trails.

Consider how and where you ride. Tubeless tires have both advantages and disdvantages when compared with traditional tubes.
hokiefyd is offline  
Old 12-10-18, 08:58 AM
  #8  
Bryan C.
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 293
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 101 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
Bryan C, thanks for that bit about the CrossCut ERT tires? Could you also post a picture of the tread pattern on them?

Bryan C. is offline  
Old 12-10-18, 09:47 AM
  #9  
hokiefyd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Northern Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 2,083

Bikes: 2018 Redline Zander, 2018 Giant Roam 2, 2015 Trek Verve 3, 1997 Trek 750, 1969 Peugeot PO-18

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 707 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Thanks, Bryan. The tread pattern itself looks like it's more or less a commuting slick?
hokiefyd is offline  
Old 12-10-18, 10:35 AM
  #10  
Bryan C.
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 293
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 101 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
Thanks, Bryan. The tread pattern itself looks like it's more or less a commuting slick?
Definitely an urban/city tire. It did ok on hard pack dirt, but as expected high speed cornering on a gravel road didn't work out very well for me.
Bryan C. is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.