Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Hybrid Bicycles
Reload this Page >

New bike similar to old Trek Navigator 2.0

Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

New bike similar to old Trek Navigator 2.0

Old 04-15-19, 11:43 AM
  #1  
Zenmaster2009
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 65
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
New bike similar to old Trek Navigator 2.0

I am a very casual rider. Years ago I had a Trek Navigator 2.0 and I loved that bike. I'm interested in finding something similar now. I would like to buy a New bike, as this is my personal preference. It seems the Trek Navigator was labeled a hybrid bike even though I'm not sure it really is.

The main things I liked about the bike were the more upright position and the nice ride I got on paved path, city streets, even going through some not so nicely paved streets. It was right up my alley but I'm having a hard time finding something very close to it and the closest I see from Trek is something called Trek Verve. Any other suggestions in the under $700ish price range?
Zenmaster2009 is offline  
Old 04-15-19, 02:13 PM
  #2  
hokiefyd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Northern Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 2,154

Bikes: 2018 Redline Zander, 2018 Giant Roam 2, 2015 Trek Verve 3, 1997 Trek 750, 1969 Peugeot PO-18

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 729 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 27 Posts
The Trek Navigator had 26" wheels, which are becoming relatively uncommon in the hybrid bike world. The Giant Sedona has you covered, though, and is probably the closest bike in current production to the Trek Navigator concept. There's a version with rim brakes $380 MSRP and a version with disc brakes ($550) MSRP. The Specialized Roll is a similar bike -- it's a comfort-oriented hybrid with 27.5" wheels. It has a rigid fork, whereas the Sedona has a suspension fork. Both bikes come with relatively wide 2.3" tires for good comfort. Specialized has more models of the Roll than Giant does of the Sedona, and the $635 Roll Sport is probably the closest model to the Sedona DX (though it comes with only a 3x7 drivetrain with a freewheel (instead of a stronger cassette). The Trek Verve may also be a good choice -- it comes with larger wheels and narrower tires than either the Sedona or Roll. Giant has a similar bike to the Verve (called the Cypress) and Specialized does as well (called the Crossroads).

I would recommend riding both of these, plus any others your dealer might recommend. The bottom line, and top priority, should be how you fit and feel on the bike.
hokiefyd is offline  
Old 04-19-19, 09:11 AM
  #3  
Zenmaster2009
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 65
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
The Trek Navigator had 26" wheels, which are becoming relatively uncommon in the hybrid bike world. The Giant Sedona has you covered, though, and is probably the closest bike in current production to the Trek Navigator concept. There's a version with rim brakes $380 MSRP and a version with disc brakes ($550) MSRP. The Specialized Roll is a similar bike -- it's a comfort-oriented hybrid with 27.5" wheels. It has a rigid fork, whereas the Sedona has a suspension fork. Both bikes come with relatively wide 2.3" tires for good comfort. Specialized has more models of the Roll than Giant does of the Sedona, and the $635 Roll Sport is probably the closest model to the Sedona DX (though it comes with only a 3x7 drivetrain with a freewheel (instead of a stronger cassette). The Trek Verve may also be a good choice -- it comes with larger wheels and narrower tires than either the Sedona or Roll. Giant has a similar bike to the Verve (called the Cypress) and Specialized does as well (called the Crossroads).

I would recommend riding both of these, plus any others your dealer might recommend. The bottom line, and top priority, should be how you fit and feel on the bike.
Thank you! This is extremely helpful and gives me a good starting point. I'll definitely see how some of these fit and feel.
Zenmaster2009 is offline  
Old 04-24-19, 02:04 PM
  #4  
Zenmaster2009
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 65
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
So I've narrowed it down to the Giant Sedona DX Disc vs Giant Sedona DX. They felt better than the Specialized Roll and Roll Sport.

Now I just need to decide if I want to spend the extra $100 on the Disc. One big thing for me is ease of removing the wheel since I'll be transporting it in my hatchback with the wheel removed. I read somewhere that's it's actually easier to use the quick release on the wheel when you have disk brakes? Can anyone comment on this?
Zenmaster2009 is offline  
Old 04-24-19, 02:29 PM
  #5  
hokiefyd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Northern Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 2,154

Bikes: 2018 Redline Zander, 2018 Giant Roam 2, 2015 Trek Verve 3, 1997 Trek 750, 1969 Peugeot PO-18

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 729 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 27 Posts
Wheel removal with disc brakes is super easy -- there's nothing to release from the brake itself -- you just undo the quick release on the axle and pull the wheel out. Having said that, wheel installation can be trickier, and you sometimes get disc rub in the front after wheel installation -- because it may not be in the fork in the exact same location as it was before. The best way to try to avoid this is by tightening the front wheel with the bike on the ground and the weight on the axle -- before you cinch the quick release. You still may get slight disc rub every now and again. It's not difficult to adjust for, and I would say that mechanical brakes can be an advantage hear because you can adjust them so they have more clearance than with hydraulic brakes.

I'd probably say that the rim brake model may be best if your front wheel is going to be out every time you ride to transport your bike. Rim brakes are far less sensitive to precise wheel positioning than are disc brakes.
hokiefyd is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
jsharr
Foo
0
07-27-12 01:28 PM
robtown
Fifty Plus (50+)
1
04-03-10 02:12 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.