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Trek FX 6 Sport a good choice?

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Trek FX 6 Sport a good choice?

Old 10-03-19, 09:24 PM
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Love_Bikes
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Trek FX 6 Sport a good choice?

I am thinking of buying FX 6 Sport. I am used cycling 10+ miles daily in my 30's, but in the past 15 Years, not much cycling, mainly running (Half Marathon) and would like to get back to cycling. I am 50+ and prefer a light weight bikes. Appreciate your help in understanding FX 6 capabilities. 60% of my riding will be in black top trail roads/pavements, and the rest in compacted dirt and gravel roads. I expect to ride 10 miles daily to start with. Can I ride FX 6 on dirt roads and parks? Do i need to change the stock tire (32mm) to a better one? Also question on the 105 group set. Why trek is not using Mountain bike components in Hybrid if the bike can be used on trails? Thank you
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Old 10-03-19, 10:43 PM
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I don’t know if the FX6 is intended to be a road and a trail bike. I think that would be more like the Dual Sports
role, but I put 38mm Bontrager LT3 tires on my FX2 Disk it does ok on the road and in dirt/gravel.

Last edited by willbuyone; 10-03-19 at 10:44 PM. Reason: Grammer
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Old 10-04-19, 08:02 AM
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FX 6 is a great Bike I have ridden one a few times : If you have to buy a Bike and change the Tires you take the Bikes full potential away. It's not the same as putting more aggressive knobby's on a Bike that already has them.

I strongly believe Companies design a Bike for optimum performance around a Specific Tire size and tread pattern . In fact I know that's what they do. Watch some videos where they test that stuff and you'll see : It's all about what Wheels and Tires are on the Bike.

I went a different Route : Last time I rode before getting back into it . A Schwinn Continental was $105.00 and was Top of the Line anywhere . So $800.00 Treks were like ridding on AIR .

I bought a 2019 Dual Sport 3 2020 FX 3 and a 2020 Verve 3 . All within a month . SO far the bike that Suits Multiple terrain the Best is the Verve 3 . I Understand why they Market it as a Leisure Comfort Bike : However it's often implied that it's a slow Bike > Which is hardly the case : I could easily keep up with Myself riding any of the 3 . I've clocked myself for speed and it's all with in Seconds .

I'm 6 ' tall 178 lbs with long arms and legs . Of the 3 Bikes the FX 3 is the Most fatiguing : All 3 Bikes are the same Size , but the FX 3 doesn't fit me nearly as well as the other 2 bikes do. All 3 Bikes are fun to ride : The heaviest is the verve at 30 lbs . Which is still a Really light weight Bike :

I think you'd really like the FX 6 : But don't change the tires : It's not a Bike you'd have fun on much gravel anyway. Regardless of the tire . I take the Bike to match where I'm going to be riding : My only caution would be Don't by the FX 6 thinking it's a good all around Bike : IMO the Dual Sport or Verve fit that category far better .

The FX 6 at $2K is a road Bike : It's a rode Bike Frame with flat bars : I did put Bontrager H5 700 x 35 tires on the FX 3 . It slowed the Bike some > It did help with gravel , but not enough I'd want to ride even a mile of it on a regular basis . With the Other 2 Bikes Gravel is actually fun . Despite all the dirt in your chain

Weight is also Not the game changer it's marketed to be : At least not for the Non Pro Rider : You'll need a Spare inner tube , maybe 2. A set of tire tools and a Pump . Something to carry it in . Plus your Phone and water > It's not hard to add weight right back on. If you do swap tires . Chances are that will add at least 2 lbs > Disc Brakes add close to 3 pounds > The vast Majority of Pros don't use them for that very reason/

Consider what type of black Top : Back Rode gravel packed with a Black Top coating isn't the main drag blacktop smoothness. Many Bike Paths in My area are concrete : Although you do encounter gravel when crossing streets : The guys in our group with Roadies and FX 6 usually dismount and walk across

Last edited by Rick53; 10-04-19 at 08:12 AM.
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Old 10-04-19, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Rick53 View Post
If you have to buy a Bike and change the Tires you take the Bikes full potential away
That has not been my experience at all.

My first hybrid was a Fuji Absolute with 28mm tires, typical hybrid tread. After a couple of years riding the stock tires, I replaced them with 35mm cyclocross tires. What a difference! The extra width and lower air pressure really smoothed things out on the rural roads I typically ride, and the grip on the edges provided more control on trails with loose stone or gravel.

The bike that the OP is asking about has basically the same geometry as the Absolute, so I would guess that putting CX tires on it would offer a similar improvement.

Having said that, I think the FX 6 is probably overkill for the purpose described. I think the FX 3 or FX 4 would do just as well or even better for a mix of roads and light trails, as the FX 6 drive train is aimed at primarily road riding. Personally, I'd opt for the gearing on the FX 3, but I ride a lot of hills. The lowest gear ratio on the FX 4 is 1.00 (34/34), whereas the FX 3 gives you a range of 0.83 up to 4.18. In fact, the FX 3 is almost identical to the Absolute I used to have (gearing, material, geometry), and that bike worked great for the purpose the OP describes.

Last edited by AU Tiger; 10-04-19 at 09:33 AM.
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Old 10-04-19, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
I am thinking of buying FX 6 Sport. I am used cycling 10+ miles daily in my 30's, but in the past 15 Years, not much cycling, mainly running (Half Marathon) and would like to get back to cycling. I am 50+ and prefer a light weight bikes. Appreciate your help in understanding FX 6 capabilities. 60% of my riding will be in black top trail roads/pavements, and the rest in compacted dirt and gravel roads. I expect to ride 10 miles daily to start with. Can I ride FX 6 on dirt roads and parks? Do i need to change the stock tire (32mm) to a better one? Also question on the 105 group set. Why trek is not using Mountain bike components in Hybrid if the bike can be used on trails? Thank you
For the riding you describe, the Trek FX6 would be just fine, even with the stock 32mm tires -- set to the correct pressure. That is how I use my Specialized Sirrus bikes, with 32s. My new one came with 38s; I changed them out after about a month. Not necessary. You might want to confirm that you could put at least 35s on the FX6 if you wanted -- I suspect you could but don't know -- but that's about it.

That bike also has the Isospeed rear decoupler, and stock you could switch to tubeless tires if you wanted. So it's pretty adaptable 'out of the box'.

It has a road drivetrain because it is, essentially, a 'road bike' though with flat bars and good tire clearance, and most purchasers probably use it as such. It isn't meant for true mountain bike trails, but those don't appear to be your intended surfaces.
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Old 10-04-19, 10:45 AM
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Very Interesting to read your posts and thank you. I would like to take the bike off road some time, so seems FX 6 may not the best fit? I will look at Verve. I see Trek Checkpoint ALR 5 has Shimino 105 Group set and is a gravel bike, I guess it is not suitable for road?


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Old 10-04-19, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Very Interesting to read your posts and thank you. I would like to take the bike off road some time, so seems FX 6 may not the best fit? I will look at Verve
It might help if you define what "off road" means to you. The FX line will be perfectly fine for rail trails and the like - paths with crushed limestone or not-too-deep gravel and dirt. Trek's description of the FX 3 includes this: "It's a commuting pro if you want it to be, or the perfect fitness companion on pavement and rail trails."

But if you're talking about paths through the woods with ruts, holes, and roots, then you might want something else. But probably not the Verve. The Verve is a comfort bike, meaning you'll sit more upright. It would be suited for the same type of surfaces the FX is, just with a less-aggressive body position. But the suspension on it is not meant for heavy-duty off-roading. For that, you'd want a true mountain bike.

The problem with mountain bikes is that they don't do well on roads. That's exactly why I have a second bike - the Kona is a lot of fun on rough off-road trails, but it's way too heavy for my typical road rides.

Last edited by AU Tiger; 10-04-19 at 11:07 AM.
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Old 10-04-19, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Very Interesting to read your posts and thank you. I would like to take the bike off road some time, so seems FX 6 may not the best fit? I will look at Verve. I see Trek Checkpoint ALR 5 has Shimino 105 Group set and is a gravel bike, I guess it is not suitable for road?
I'm not saying Only My advice matters : I will say I have the Bikes and have ridden teh FX3 and FX6 : A Verve is a much better option : With the FX 3 You'll slip all over the place anytime you hit lose spots : Especially when you hit a spot where a truck or Dirt Bike has passed over : Here are all 3 Bikes : What I am telling you is from My experience : Not what the website says in Marketing :

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Old 10-04-19, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Rick53 View Post
I'm not saying Only My advice matters : I will say I have the Bikes and have ridden teh FX3 and FX6 : A Verve is a much better option : With the FX 3 You'll slip all over the place anytime you hit lose spots : Especially when you hit a spot where a truck or Dirt Bike has passed over : Here are all 3 Bikes : What I am telling you is from My experience : Not what the website says in Marketing :
But the primary difference between the Verve and the FX is one of geometry, while the difference in handling which you describe is a difference of tires. Those are two different things. I realize that the Verve can fit wider tires than the FX, but that isn't the primary difference between the bikes. My point is that the FX will fit tires which are wider than the stock tires and a different style than the stock tires - plenty enough to handle light-duty trails. But you cannot change the seat tube angle on the Verve if you decide you want a more aggressive riding position. So first the OP should decide what type of geometry he prefers, and then move on to tires.

You seem convinced for some reason that it's a bad idea to put a different type of tire on a given bike, but that isn't consistent with the experience of most people - there are many threads on this forum about swapping out tires, and you're the first person I've ever heard suggest that doing so is a bad idea or that it somehow diminishes the ability of the bike to perform as intended. It's interesting that you suggest the OP ignore the manufacturer's marketing description, but you insist that he should indeed accept the manufacturer's choice of tire as the only appropriate tire for that bike.

Wider tires with different tread will take care of the "sliding all over the place" issue, and they'll probably make the rest of the ride more comfortable as well. That has nothing to do with fitness geometry vs. comfort geometry, which is the primary difference between the FX and the Verve. The FX 3 is basically identical the Absolute 1.5 which I rode for years with 35mm tires and never had an issue riding on roads or light trails.

I'm seriously not trying to get into an argument, but I just hate to see the OP buy into the misinformation you're passing along. Hybrid bikes are designed to accept a variety of tires. You're the only person I've ever heard suggest otherwise. If the OP finds the geometry of the Verve more comfortable, then great - he should go with that. But not out of fear that the FX can't handle bigger tires.

Last edited by AU Tiger; 10-04-19 at 03:54 PM.
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Old 10-04-19, 03:24 PM
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FX2 Disk with 38mm Bontrager LT3s no problem on gravel and dirt roads .
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Old 10-04-19, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Very Interesting to read your posts and thank you. I would like to take the bike off road some time, so seems FX 6 may not the best fit? I will look at Verve. I see Trek Checkpoint ALR 5 has Shimino 105 Group set and is a gravel bike, I guess it is not suitable for road?
Again: the FX6 is a great bike; with suitable tires, it will be just fine on non-technical unpaved surfaces: dirt and/or gravel roads and tracks, including forest tracks and bridleways/towpaths and the like.

The Checkpoint is a 'gravel' bike, yes, but essentially one can think of 'gravel' bikes as 'hybrids' with drop bars. So the same points apply: a Checkpoint would be just fine on all the surfaces that an FX6 would be -- again, with suitable tires.

However, as another poster points out indirectly, if by "off-road" you mean more technical singletrack/mtb trails -- different story. Very skilled/physically-resilient cyclists can and do ride those on hybrid/cyclocross/'gravel' bikes, but at 68 I certainly wouldn't and don't. I love mtb'ing, but I have a mountainbike for that.

So really only you can decide what will work for you. My advice: try some different bikes/types of bike, and purchase now what you think will work for what you think the bulk of your riding will be now. You can always add another one later.

I will say one thing: the notion that a bicycle like an FX6 is somehow inherently prone to spilling you if it hits a bit of dirt, sand, or gravel is nonsense. As I said in my first post here, I've been riding a Specialized Sirrus on slick 32mm 'road' tires (see pic below) on the kinds of mixed surfaces you mention in your original post, and on wet, slick Autumn leaves each year, for years. I now have a new one, but the point remains: never been an issue.

Good luck!

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Old 10-04-19, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
I see Trek Checkpoint ALR 5 has Shimino 105 Group set and is a gravel bike, I guess it is not suitable for road?
I forgot to address this question before.

This summer I switched from the Fuji Absolute I talked about earlier to a Fuji Jari, which is a gravel bike very similar to the Trek Checkpoint. The tires that came on it are 35mm cyclocross tires, very similar to the ones I had run on the Absolute, and just like before they are great for the roads in my area as well as gravel/dirt paths. It has a SRAM Apex 1x11 drive train, so I can't really comment specifically on the 105 group set. But gravel bikes are by definition endurance-geometry road bikes with wide tires, so they are perfectly at home on pavement and on gravel. They are essentially drop-bar hybrid bikes, and that's really how I think of mine.

When I first got into biking about four or five years ago, I had zero interest in drop-bar bikes, mainly because I was picturing myself all crouched down in the drops. What changed my mind was realizing that the hoods offered a very natural hand position for me. That is now by far the position I ride in most, and it has completely eliminated all hand numbness. And as it turns out, I do enjoy the drops from time to time also.

You may or may not find a drop bar bike comfortable, but it's good that you're at least giving it some consideration. But to answer your question again, a gravel bike will do perfectly well on the road and on light off-road trails. I absolutely love mine!
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Old 10-04-19, 07:55 PM
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We've referred to different categories of bikes in this thread, so it might be helpful to define them. Here is a very general description of each of the types of bikes which might reasonably be called hybrid bikes. There is a lot of overlap among them, so the descriptions are pretty loose. And I'm not even throwing gearing and drive trains into the mix - that would really make the list a lot longer and probably a lot less helpful.

Fitness bikes
Flat bar
Aggressive rider position, but not as much as a traditional road bike
Typically accept tires in the 28mm – 38mm range
Rigid fork
Examples: Trek FX, Fuji Absolute

Dual-sport bike
Flat bar
Similar riding position to fitness bikes
Similar tire size to fitness bikes, sometimes a little wider
Suspension fork, usually coil not air (like a better mountain bike would have)
Examples: Trek DS, Giant Roam

Comfort bike
Flat bar
More relaxed geometry than fitness bike (rider sits more upright rather than leaning forward)
Somewhat wider tires than fitness bike, usually in the 32mm – 50mm range
Rigid fork or suspension fork
Examples: Trek Verve, Giant Cypress

650B hybrid
Flat bar or drop bar
Not as common as fitness bikes, but similar geometry
Rigid fork
650B tires (smaller rim but much wider tires, usually in the 1.9” to 2.3” range)
Examples: Kona Dew, Salsa Journeyman

Gravel bike
Drop bar
Endurance road geometry – similar to fitness hybrid, less aggressive than racing geometry
Rigid fork
Similar tire size to fitness bike
Examples: Trek Checkpoint, Fuji Jari

Cyclocross bike
Drop bar
Racing road geometry – more aggressive rider position, shorter wheelbase
Rigid fork
Similar tire size to fitness and gravel bikes
Examples: Giant TCX, Cannondale CAADX
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Old 10-04-19, 08:36 PM
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Great conversations and thanks again, The LBS has Check Point SL5, FX 3 and Verve. I will go and test ride. The knowledge and advice here is outstanding.
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Old 10-05-19, 09:42 AM
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I simply don't think spending 2,000 on a 20lb Bike designed around a road Bike Frame like the FX 6 . Designed with the domain Frame > Is a Bike you'd want wider tires on. As it's not what is intended : Can you ? Yeah But WHy ? Experiment with something less : You might even find a good deal locally on Facebook Market place : Good luck
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Old 10-05-19, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Great conversations and thanks again, The LBS has Check Point SL5, FX 3 and Verve. I will go and test ride. The knowledge and advice here is outstanding.
Let us know what you get.

I got a FX 2 in the spring and love the bike. I've covered all kind of roads surfaces with no issues this summer.

As the distance I traveled each ride increased a fair amount, I ended up on roads where the vast majority of bikes were road bikes (e.g. drop bars). They always zoom past me, lol.

Now, I'm not fast by any measure (my max cruising speed is around 25 kms per hours) but I started to think about trying a bike with drop bars for the longer rides on mixed surfaces that are mostly small highways.

I was at the LBS where I got my bike and started looking at a Checkpoint and am now considering getting one.

I love the FX for around town, MUP's, etc. but I'm thinking the Checkpoint would be great on the longer outings.

Retiring very soon, so having 2 bikes is not an extravagant expense (that's what I'm telling the wife anyway, lol).

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Old 10-05-19, 04:20 PM
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Test rode FX2, Verve 2 and Checkpoint SL5. (LBS didn't have ALR5). May be I will try ALR 5 in a different shop tomorrow. Verve 2 is very relaxing and comfortable. FX2 is good as well, but the tire size is a concern. SL5 is a bit aggressive seating, but I like a lot. I am 5'9", so rode 54" CheckPoint. With 52" frame, as I could rest both of my feet on the ground. But the LBS Technician recommended size 54" Frame (with 54" I am barely touching the ground). I am thinking of buying ALR 5 for the following reasons

--I am close to retirement, not going to be buying a bike often, so i would prefer a nicer bike. I like aluminum frame and 105 group components
--I can scale my performance in ALR 5 ( I can ride 50 to 100 miles if I want to)
--Don't have to worry about what surface I am riding in
--Drop-bar gives more options
--Ability to add rack
--Swap a wheel with a thinner tire If I need to race in the road
--Not sure 650$ price difference worth the carbon frame of SL5 (See price below)

Price options
---------------
2019 SL5 --> Out the door including Tax $2,650 (300$ discount)
2019 ALR5 --> Out the door including Tax $1,900 (300$ discount)
2020 ALR5 --> Out the door including Tax $2,000 (200$ discount)

I am thinking of 2020 ALR5. As far as the colors, Trek only have the British Racing Green and Charcoal in stock. The color I like (Matte Axinit) is out of stock and can only be available in Jan 2021. That is disappointing.
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Old 10-05-19, 05:11 PM
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I tried to look at Other manufacturer's Gravel bike, but not successful.

--Cannondale Topstone AL 105 Bike is not available at REI
--JARI 1.1 Is not available at the local dealer
--Kona Sutra LTD is not available at the dealer
--Specialized is not cheap compared to Trek. I guess same quality and same price range

I am unable to locate a comparable bike to ALR5
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Old 10-05-19, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
SL5 is a bit aggressive seating, but I like a lot. I am 5'9", so rode 54" CheckPoint. With 52" frame, as I could rest both of my feet on the ground. But the LBS Technician recommended size 54" Frame (with 54" I am barely touching the ground).
I would say that if you were comfortable on the Checkpoint, you won't regret having a drop-bar bike. I have thoroughly enjoyed the extra options my gravel bike has given me this summer. I get that they're not for everyone, but if you liked it then I think it's a better choice for you than a flat-bar hybrid.

As far as size goes, I am 5'10" and have a 56". I wouldn't want anything larger, but I am comfortable on it. So I would guess the LBS tech is correct in recommending the 54". When you say you can barely touch the ground, do you mean while on the saddle or even after you come off of the saddle? That's normal while on the saddle; it would definitely be too large for you, though, if you mean you can barely touch the ground while just standing over the top tube.

Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Not sure 650$ price difference worth the carbon frame of SL5 (See price below)
I agree with you. My Jari has an aluminum frame with a carbon fork like the ALR5, and I have never felt like I needed anything more than that to counteract road chatter. Those 40mm tires will do wonders for comfort, and even if you get a narrower tire like 32mm or 35mm for road riding, that's still more than enough when combined with the drop-bar hand positions to ward off any numbness. Like I said before, when I went from 28mm to 35mm on my Absolute, it really smoothed things out a lot. And with drop bars, not only do you get more hand positions, but in my opinion the bar tape dampens vibrations much better flat-bar grips such as Ergons. The gravel bike has completely eliminated all numbness I was experiencing before, so I don't think you need the carbon for that.

A lighter bike is certainly a good thing, but I don't think I'd pay a $650 premium for it. I'd bet the ALR5 weighs pretty close to what my Jari does, and I don't find it heavy in the least.

I would go with the ALR5 and spend some of the savings on a good pair of clipless pedals and shoes.

Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
I am thinking of 2020 ALR5. As far as the colors, Trek only have the British Racing Green and Charcoal in stock. The color I like (Matte Axinit) is out of stock and can only be available in Jan 2021. That is disappointing.
That is too bad - that matte axinit looks awesome (online, at least).

I will say, though, that I've owned three bikes since getting into this sport a few years ago, and I wasn't super excited about the color on any of them when I got them... but they eventually grew on me. In fact, I absolutely love the glossy black color of my mountain bike now, and I like the silver/red combo on the Jari a lot more now than I did at first.

Having said that, how much riding do you think you'll do before January? If you live in a cold, snowy climate like me, there's not much time left in the riding season this year. And if so, then it might be worth the wait for the axinit -- that's a really different color, one for which I'd probably be willing to give up a few weeks of immediate riding in exchange for having that color for years to come.

At any rate, glad you were able to get one a variety of bikes and try them out. It's always good to do your research online, but nothing can replace getting on the bike and riding. Let us know what you end up deciding.

Last edited by AU Tiger; 10-05-19 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 10-05-19, 08:07 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by AU Tiger View Post
I would say that if you were comfortable on the Checkpoint, you won't regret having a drop-bar bike. I have thoroughly enjoyed the extra options my gravel bike has given me this summer. I get that they're not for everyone, but if you liked it then I think it's a better choice for you than a flat-bar hybrid.

As far as size goes, I am 5'10" and have a 56". I wouldn't want anything larger, but I am comfortable on it. So I would guess the LBS tech is correct in recommending the 54". When you say you can barely touch the ground, do you mean while on the saddle or even after you come off of the saddle? That's normal while on the saddle; it would definitely be too large for you, though, if you mean you can barely touch the ground while just standing over the top tube.

.
Thank you for your response. I meant while sitting on the saddle. I will see if i can test ride ALR5 tomorrow. Does Trek discounts cycles during Winter?

Last edited by Love_Bikes; 10-05-19 at 08:11 PM.
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Old 10-05-19, 08:56 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
I meant while sitting on the saddle. I will see if i can test ride ALR5 tomorrow.
When you test ride again, if you still feel like the 54" is too large for you, make sure you try making adjustments to the saddle - both height and tilt. The tip of my saddle was originally tilted too far up. First I leveled it out completely, and then ended up with it tilted slightly up. All of that is personal preference, but it can definitely make the bike feel like it is the wrong size when in fact you just need to fine tune it a little.

Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Does Trek discounts cycles during Winter?
I don't know. Maybe for the Black Friday - Christmas season? I think a lot of that depends heavily on how sales have been in a particular year and what stock they want to get rid of quickly. It may even vary from one shop to another - I don't really know how strictly Trek controls the prices their authorized retailers can offer.
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Old 10-06-19, 06:55 AM
  #22  
Roger Ramjet
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
I am 5'9", so rode 54" CheckPoint. With 52" frame, as I could rest both of my feet on the ground. But the LBS Technician recommended size 54" Frame (with 54" I am barely touching the ground).
I have a 2018 Checkpoint SL5, and a 2018 Checkpoint ALR5. I am 5'9", with a 30-inch inseam, and the 54 cm frame fits me perfectly. I would suggest that you NOT make your decision for a 52 cm based on being able to rest both feet on the ground. That means the bike is not tall enough for you, in my experience.

When Trek dealers discount their bikes, my observation is that they usually do so at "end-of-season" in July to October on the current year's models (would be 2019 now). You aren't likely to get any discount on 2020 models until next July or so.
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Old 10-06-19, 07:52 AM
  #23  
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Trek FX 6 Sport a good choice?

Sure, It's probably a great bike. If you have any concerns you could just slap on some wider tires and attack the other 40% of riding that you say you like to do. But, from what you're describing I would be leaning more towards the Checkpoint ALR5. It would handle all your offroad needs and then if you were to replace the 40mm tires down to some 28mm width road tires you'd have a very capable road bike. You could always pick a sturdy 32 or 32mm tire and basically have the best of both worlds.
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Old 10-06-19, 01:45 PM
  #24  
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Thanks again for all your help. I just bought a bike. It is not ALR5. I got a great deal on Salsa Vaya 105 with 37mm Tire. I decided on this as I can save 500$ compared to ALR5

-- I can ride this on any surface
-- Drop bar
-- 105 components
-- 500$ discount
-- Higher Tire clearance - I can use any tire up to 45 MM
-- This is a touring bike, I can mount racks
-- Generally Good Reviews online

Drawbacks
-- Mechanical Disc Brake
-- Not an attractive color
-- Earlier year models had fork failure, but the LBS Mechanic said this 2019 does not have this issue

I decided based on the price and function. The board here is not allowing me post picture unless I have 10 posts
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Old 10-06-19, 03:20 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Thanks again for all your help. I just bought a bike. It is not ALR5. I got a great deal on Salsa Vaya 105 with 37mm Tire.
Congrats!!! Salsa makes very good bikes, and that one looks to be no exception. I think you're gonna have a lot of fun riding it!

Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
Drawbacks
-- Mechanical Disc Brake
My mountain bike has hydraulics, and my gravel bike has mechanical disc brakes. The hydraulics are definitely more powerful, but I have yet to be in a situation where I thought that really mattered in practice. And as far as mechanical disc brakes go, the TRP Spyre is the best (from what I've read) because both pads move to clamp the disc rather than just one pad pushing the disc into the other. That's what I have on my Jari, and I'm happy with them.

Originally Posted by Love_Bikes View Post
-- Not an attractive color
Did you get teal or purple? They're both different
Like I said before, I wasn't crazy about any of my bike colors at first, but they've all grown on me.

Congrats again, and enjoy riding!
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