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Max Tire Width for Canyon Roadlite CF 8

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Max Tire Width for Canyon Roadlite CF 8

Old 10-03-19, 10:39 PM
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reikairen
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Max Tire Width for Canyon Roadlite CF 8

Canyon only officially supports 30mm for their Roadlite series. Is there any room for something larger, what is the max tire width that is still safe? I was thinking about getting the Panaracer GravelKing SK 43mm but if thatís too big they also have 32 and 35mm. The idea being they would perform better in varying road conditions (rain, cracks in asphalt, gravel...etc). Long winded way to ask, what is the max and what would you actually recommend? Thank you!
Relevant specs:

Frame Axle Dimension: 12 x 142 mm

Brake Mount: Flat Mount

Fork: Canyon FK0050 CF SL Disc

Fork Steerer: 1 1/8''

Fork Axle Dimension: 12 x 100 mm

Wheel: DT Swiss E 1800 Spline db

Rim Height: 32 mm

Inner Width: 20 mm

Stock Tire: Schwalbe G-One Speed 30 mm
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Old 10-08-19, 11:19 PM
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reikairen
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Think I found the answer

Since Iím 5í5 like DowneasTTerís wife I also ordered the XS which means I actually have the 27.5 650b tires. I assume based on what he said that I can go up to 32mm. Seems to be a great middle ground anyways as even Trek Checkpoint AL 4 come stock with 32s. What all purpose tires (size/type) would you all use? Iím not racing or competing but want a safe and stable ride. Iím riding the trail system in Hesse Germany.

@DowneasTTer:
ďOne of the problems with my wife's bike is that Canyon uses a 650b wheel set on their xs frames. That really restricts tire choice especially if you are going tubeless and the widest you can go is 32 mmĒ

Last edited by reikairen; 10-11-19 at 06:47 AM.
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Old 10-09-19, 03:57 AM
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Given the wheel size (584mm), I agree this really limits your tire choices. Schwalbe's website for the G-One Speed shows only the 30-584 (your stock tire). The Schwalbe Kojak is available in a 35-584. That may be too large for your frame, but it could be a possibility; it's a pure slick. The Continental Contact Speed is available in 32-584. It looks similar in concept to the G-One, and should be a fast and smooth tire on most hard surfaces. And then the Continental Grand Prix 5000, by all accounts a terrific tire, is available in 28-584 (slightly narrower than your stock tire).

If you don't have the bike yet, I would probably wait and see how you like the stock G-One tires and then go from there. You may decide that you don't really want or need to change them after you ride them some. Good luck!
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Old 10-09-19, 08:14 AM
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reikairen
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Thanks for the great reply hokifyd! I'll definitely see if the G-One Speed suits me well before trying a 32 or 35mm. I just got the bike in the mail and waiting for the right time to put it together.

Current hesitations before I start messing with it is due to some negative comments made towards the geometry of the Roadlite. I am guessing its because of how high the seat is in relation to the handlebars. Never noticed when I put in the order but I guess it does sit a little high. I guess in any case I have a good thirty days if I don't use the bike to return it. The intention of buying the bike was a high price for performance bike to use for general fitness, commuting, and city/trail riding. I was told by Canyon that the comfort of the bike would be better then what I would get with gravel and cyclo-cross bikes. I didn't want their commuter series because of the incompatibility with many indoor trainers. Is the geometry of this bike uncomfortable? Would I be better off waiting for the Topstone 105 or something like it to come back in stock at my local bike store?

Thank you!
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Old 10-09-19, 01:52 PM
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All tires will be a bit different. Rim width and pressure also play a role. Typically manufacturer want to see 5mm clearance on either side for mud clearance, untrue wheel etc.

You can cut into that 5mm buffer, but there is a risk. Adding 2mm tire size (1 mm on each side) should be OK, but don't sue us if it isn't.
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Old 10-09-19, 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by reikairen View Post
I was told by Canyon that the comfort of the bike would be better then what I would get with gravel and cyclo-cross bikes. I didn't want their commuter series because of the incompatibility with many indoor trainers. Is the geometry of this bike uncomfortable? Would I be better off waiting for the Topstone 105 or something like it to come back in stock at my local bike store?
I think comfort is going to be different for everyone. The risk in buying over the internet (Canyon, etc.) is you're sort of stuck with the bike if you don't like it after assembling and riding it, and there's no where to test ride it prior to purchase. As someone who has before purchased a bike from a bike shop, didn't like it, and returned it to the shop, I generally recommend being able to give a bike a good test ride before purchase. I know this strays beyond your original question of tire size, but if you're questioning the tire size, and also questioning the comfort, you might want to step back and test ride a few local bikes before assembling the Canyon.

Had you ridden bikes locally before purchasing the Canyon? Different brands from different bike shops? Did you like or not like certain ones?
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Old 10-09-19, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
I think comfort is going to be different for everyone. The risk in buying over the internet (Canyon, etc.) is you're sort of stuck with the bike if you don't like it after assembling and riding it, and there's no where to test ride it prior to purchase. As someone who has before purchased a bike from a bike shop, didn't like it, and returned it to the shop, I generally recommend being able to give a bike a good test ride before purchase. I know this strays beyond your original question of tire size, but if you're questioning the tire size, and also questioning the comfort, you might want to step back and test ride a few local bikes before assembling the Canyon.

Had you ridden bikes locally before purchasing the Canyon? Different brands from different bike shops? Did you like or not like certain ones?
Most LBS won't take the bike back just because you don't like it. At least not without restocking fee or buying a different bike. And if a bike is comfortable takes some hundred miles with fiddling with fittings, saddles etc. Not many LBS will let you have extended test rides.
My experience with LBS "test rides"
- Trek dealer let me ride a fatbike on a 200' asphalt course behind the store. If I recall correctly is was a size too small since that is what they had...
- specialized LBS didn't have my size in stock and offered to get one in my size from the same chain if I put 50% down upfront.... that 50% was more than 100% for a similar online bike.
Needless to say I ended up with an online fatbike and it fts me.

OP's problem has nothing to do with the distribution channel.
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Old 10-10-19, 01:56 PM
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I'm glad you found an online bike that fits you, and I'm sorry your local shops didn't take care of you. Ultimately, the OP is going to have to decide whether the reward of assembling and riding the bike outweighs the financial risk of doing so and not being happy with it. You're right that most bike shops will at least trade you out for a different bike if you don't like the one you bought. The OP doesn't even have that option here, so I think it's entirely prudent, given the OP's hesitations shared about both tire size and frame comfort, to recommend that all options be explored (because the OP is still within the criteria of the 100% refund policy, not having assembled the bike yet). Unfortunately, individual comfort can be examined only on an assembled bike and it appears that assembling and riding it puts one outside of Canyon's return policy, at least as it's described on their website. Perhaps they are more lenient if contacted by phone, or if one requests an exchange for a different model.

@reikairen, if you do keep it and ride it, I hope it fits you well and you like it. Canyon seems to have a great bike going here, and most are very happy with their purchase.
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Old 10-10-19, 02:28 PM
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Thanks for the help everyone! I think Iíll be putting it together soon. It should be a near perfect fit as XS doesnít have me between sizes at 5í5 /165cm. I believe most negative feedback on the bike is that it costs a lot for a fitness bike. Aggressive geometry like a road bike but with un-aero cockpit. That with that amount of money I could have gotten a decent drop bar road bike...

Is it worth it to have a bike shop build the bike or at least inspect it afterwards? It doesnít seem too hard but then again Iíd hate to mess something up.

How bout getting it fitted / adjusted at a shop? Is that worth it? Thanks again!!
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Old 10-10-19, 06:17 PM
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Assembling the bike shouldn't be too difficult to do. You can have a quick read through the instructions to see what it entails. With some bikes, it's more or less just installing the front wheel and handlebar and that's about it. With other bikes, it may be a little more involved. If it has hydraulic brakes, those should be fully bled and sealed from the factory. All drivetrain cables should be properly adjusted, too, or at least close.

If you're not comfortable doing adjustments on your own, then it would be good to have a bike shop look it over after you assemble it, or just bring them the box and have them do it. I personally have built a lot of bikes and I would be comfortable doing it myself. I also wouldn't need them to fit or adjust anything to me because I'm comfortable with doing that myself. Generally, you want to set your saddle height so that your drive leg is almost all the way extended at the bottom of the stroke, with still a slight bend in the knee. There is a lot of information on that on the internet. You probably don't have too much adjustment available at the handlebar. You may be able to re-arrange the stem and spacers if it has spacers, but that would generally be the extent of it. I'd set the saddle height where it feels comfortable to you and then go for a ride. As @HerrKaLeun noted, it can take a little while before you really get used to a new riding position, so don't get discouraged too soon if you're not quite sure about it. If you're still not feeling it after many weeks of riding, then you might consider bringing it to a bike shop to see what they might recommend.

Good luck!
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