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Advice needed: need to choose between two options for urban riding

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Advice needed: need to choose between two options for urban riding

Old 01-28-20, 04:29 PM
  #1  
j.layne
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Advice needed: need to choose between two options for urban riding

Hi I am buying an entry level bike for leisure and general urban cycling locally (school runs) occasional long rides with the family. May commute but I work 10 miles away with two Thames river crossings so itís a bit daunting. I would love advice on what to buy. Iím presently thinking either a btwin hoprider 500 since itís all kitted out with rack and lights and stand and other practical things or the cannondale quick 6 since it is lighter and faster for when I do want to go for a long ride out of town and no child with me. Budget of 400 quid. Anyone with experience of one or both?Cannondale Key Features:
  • SmartForm C3 Alloy Frame for light and nimble maneuverability in the town or city
  • Chromoly Fork is engineered to be strong enough to hold up to the rigours of city riding
  • Shimano Tourney 21 speed Drivetrain for precise gear changes and making it easier to ride up steep hills
  • V Brakess for reliability and consistency you can count on for controlled stopping in all conditions
  • Kenda Kourier 700 x 35c Tyres for the best compromise between speed and grip


Btwin:
FRAMEThe aluminium step-through frame is light, rigid and stable. The 6061 aluminium frame has undergone heat treatment to increase its durability. Available in two sizes: M, L (M: 1.50 m to 1.60 m / L: 1.60m to 1.78m)

FORK/SUSPENSIONSUNTOUR SF15 coil suspension fork. The fork is suitable for urban cycling. With 40 mm clearance, you'll cruise just as easily down a bike path as on rougher roads. This fork considerably improves traction around bends and makes emergency braking safer (no sticking due to wheels locking).

DRIVETRAINShimano Tourney trigger shifters, Shimano Fire Plus 8-speed rear derailleur, KMC chain.

CRANKSET / CASSETTEShimano triple chainset with guard 48-38-28T
Shimano CS-HG41 cassette, 8 speeds 11-32T

BRAKESFront and rear V-Brakes with Shimano lever.
Pads can be easily changed.

HANDLEBAR / STEM / STEERINGSlightly curved handlebar, height-adjustable damper stem (tool required), built in headset.
Ergonomic grips to hold the VIOO Clip visibility accessory.

WHEELSLarge wheels (700) for greater stability at high speeds. Double-wall aluminium rims increase resistance to torsion and impacts.

TYRESKenda ATB 700 x 38 stiff bead tyres with reflective strips. Weight of 920 g, highly durable 22 TPI carcass.
Puncture-resistant strip.
Inner tubes are equipped with car valves, so tyres can be inflated at a service station.

SADDLE / SEAT POSTThe SELLE ROYALE honeycomb foam structure offers comfort across the entire saddle.

PEDALSAluminium pedals.

ACCESSORIES / EQUIPMENTEcho 15 lux halogen front light. Light powered via a Shimano hub dynamo: take care when connecting the light.
Double pannier rack with a spring that can hold up to 18 kg.

WEIGHT16.9 kg, fully equipped in size M.
This bike complies with standard ISO4210 for a cyclist weighing 100kg max.
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Old 01-29-20, 04:30 AM
  #2  
subgrade
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It all depends on what your actual needs are, and how much the weight matters to you. To me the greatest advantage of the Hoprider would seem the dynamo hub. I haven't ever really needed a rack or a kickstand. Fenders are important for commuting in bad weather but they are not that expensive an upgrade. The suspension fork you can most probably do without (I am not against suspension forks on hybrids, unlike what seems to be the majority here; just going by the description of the riding you'll do you most probably don't need one, especially such a low-end model).
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Old 01-29-20, 05:23 AM
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j.layne
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Want to kit out both

Thanks for replying! I would want the rack and kickstand either way and fenders so would have to upgrade the cannondale. I want it to replace public transport if I can so includes going shopping.

Weight wise I need to be able to pick it up easily and carry up stairs if needed and not be too sluggish but Iím not racing anyone. Which is generally the better bike?

Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
It all depends on what your actual needs are, and how much the weight matters to you. To me the greatest advantage of the Hoprider would seem the dynamo hub. I haven't ever really needed a rack or a kickstand. Fenders are important for commuting in bad weather but they are not that expensive an upgrade. The suspension fork you can most probably do without (I am not against suspension forks on hybrids, unlike what seems to be the majority here; just going by the description of the riding you'll do you most probably don't need one, especially such a low-end model).
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Old 01-29-20, 05:34 AM
  #4  
BlueCyclist
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Get the BTwin.

It is actually a treking bike which are very popular in Northern Europe for exactly the kind of cycling you want to do. It it designed for and has the important bits on it (rack/mudguards/lights) which are vital for commuting and constant use cycling.
Suspension forks are something which is very much a personal thing and depends on the context. If you are focussed on speed and lightness and only cycle on smooth roads, forks are not for you. If you are looking to go on many different surfaces (nothing too rough mind) and value some comfort and respite from the daily grind of poor road surfaces, then a suspension fork is a great idea. You also don't need mountain conquoring forks either on a commuter/hybrid. A simple and robust pair with a nice bit of compliance is good enough so ignore the "budget forks are rubbish" brigade. Its horses for courses. I recently switched to a sus fork on my daily commute and i can't see myself going back to a rigid fork. The comfort, safety and security are to much to lose in favour of a very marginal weight gain/speed loss.

A dynamo and kickstand are also massively useful.

Weight wise, both will be within a kg or two if you factor in the rack/mudguards, etc

YMMV obv.
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Old 01-29-20, 06:08 AM
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j.layne
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Thanks for the advice!

Thanks will head to Decathlon!
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