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Trek Verve tire size

Old 03-20-20, 07:54 PM
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CoffeedrinkerNC
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Trek Verve tire size

I have a Trek Verve 2 stock with 45mm wide tires. I have ridden about 150 miles in 2 months so far, as the temps increase I plan to be ridding 100 miles a week, I ride pave roads and rail to trail paths. Would I be better served with a narrower tire like a 30mm to 35mm tire?
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Old 03-20-20, 09:25 PM
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I went from 32 to 28 on my FX. The difference was quite noticeable. If you move down to a 32 you will defiantly notice the difference, you will also have a much lighter tire. The Verve is a little hit heavier of a bike so be sure to purchase a sturdy tire.
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Old 03-21-20, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by CoffeedrinkerNC View Post
I have a Trek Verve 2 stock with 45mm wide tires. I have ridden about 150 miles in 2 months so far, as the temps increase I plan to be ridding 100 miles a week, I ride pave roads and rail to trail paths. Would I be better served with a narrower tire like a 30mm to 35mm tire?
I think the differences you'll notice or, rather, the benefits you'll gain, depend on your goals. If you're looking to make pedaling more efficient, one thing to look at is your fit on the bike. The Verve has a fairly relaxed seat tube angle, meaning your hip and thigh muscles probably aren't in the ideal position for power and efficiency. Comfort, yes. But perhaps not efficiency. You may consider moving your seat forward on its tracks if you can. This will put your body in a better position over the pedals.

If you like the bike as it is, and you're just looking to optimize the tires, narrower tires can feel like they're faster, but there are trade-offs. They have to be run at a higher pressure to prevent pinch-flatting. This higher pressure both reduces comfort and makes you feel faster (you can feel the grain of the road passing quickly beneath you). Many studies have demonstrated very little difference in rolling resistance between similar tires in wide vs. narrow sizes. In fact, even pro racers are starting to upsize their tires, from 25 to 28 and even to 32mm. The key is not as much the size, but the composition of the tire itself. Your Verve has tires that are relatively inexpensive, heavy, and with a thick puncture protection layer. None of those attributes contribute positively to speed, efficiency, or comfort. Tires like these typically have higher rolling resistance coefficients, meaning they create more friction running down the road than other tires do. Additionally, the surface you ride can have a large influence on the size and type of tire that may be optimal for you.

I think this is a pretty good video that delves into tire inflation and tire size. One of the take-aways is, "if it feels fast, then it probably isn't fast." That may not necessarily hold true in every case, but it's food for thought nonetheless.

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Old 03-21-20, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
I think the differences you'll notice or, rather, the benefits you'll gain, depend on your goals. If you're looking to make pedaling more efficient, one thing to look at is your fit on the bike. The Verve has a fairly relaxed seat tube angle, meaning your hip and thigh muscles probably aren't in the ideal position for power and efficiency. Comfort, yes. But perhaps not efficiency. You may consider moving your seat forward on its tracks if you can. This will put your body in a better position over the pedals.
My goals are exercise and fun, to get myself into better shape. I'm looking to ride 20 miles a day 5 time a week. I picked the Verve because I have a bad back, 2 herniated discs in my lower back, need a comfortable riding position bike.
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Old 03-21-20, 08:17 AM
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If you plan, and accomplish 100 miles weeks you're going to be putting on a lot of miles and a higher quality tire is going to perform and feel better than the stock 48's you have on it now. I did have a comfort bike years ago and went from 38's to 32's and it made a huge difference in my riding enjoyment. I went from a beaded rim to a folding tire which dropped the tire's weight considerably. If you want to experiment try going down in size (and finding a folding bead tire) and gradually reduce the width. Going from the 45's to just a 38 is going to open your eyes.

The other thing that is going to open your eyes is doing 100 mile weeks on that bike. You will be getting in twice the workout as opposed to a lighter, faster fitness bike.
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Old 03-27-20, 10:41 AM
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I asked Trek support this question for the same bike. They recommend no less than 35 mm. I put these 42ís on my wifeís bike. She wanted puncture resistance.
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