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My first bike....did I make a bad choice?

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My first bike....did I make a bad choice?

Old 04-10-20, 10:05 AM
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Ferji425
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My first bike....did I make a bad choice?

So I got my Trek Verve1 aka first ďgrown upĒ bike last Saturday. All I knew is I wanted to get some exercise and be comfortable while doing so. Also that I would be riding on sidewalks. I did some research before going to my local bike shop but honestly it was quite overwhelming. All I figured out was that a hybrid bike was best for what I wanted.

Iíve ridden all but one day since I got it and doing between 8-10 miles each time. Overall Iíve been comfortable and enjoying it. My bottom is less sore with each ride and just having fun getting exercise that doesnít feel like a chore.

My questioning comes from the following...
At times the sidewalks have cracks and are uneven making it a painful/uncomfortable ride. I do lift myself off the seat to help minimize it. Also Iíve had to ride on the grass if someone refuses to move to a side and either walks or rides right down the middle. On the grass even for the short distance it struggles.

Keep in mind again that I am a newbie. So after this week of riding Iíve just wondered should I have gotten something with suspension? Or is all this normal and I did make a good choice?

Thank you in advance for your help!
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Old 04-10-20, 10:26 AM
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Trek Verve 1 seems to come with 45 mm tires - https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...-disc/p/28000/
This is plenty wide to run over seriously bad surfaces like chunky gravel etc. Grass should be no problem at all, you just need to learn to ride bike, it does take some time, it is normal.
Also, what pressure are you running in your tires? It may be too high - this will cause a rough ride. And of course, not all tires are equal, I'm pretty sure that this bike comes with very low end tires and their "quality" contributes to harsh ride feel.
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Old 04-10-20, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Oso Polar View Post
Trek Verve 1 seems to come with 45 mm tires -
This is plenty wide to run over seriously bad surfaces like chunky gravel etc. Grass should be no problem at all, you just need to learn to ride bike, it does take some time, it is normal.
Also, what pressure are you running in your tires? It may be too high - this will cause a rough ride. And of course, not all tires are equal, I'm pretty sure that this bike comes with very low end tires and their "quality" contributes to harsh ride feel.
Thank you for your input! I had to look up the details online as for the tires. It has Bontrager H5, wire bead, 30 tpi, 700x45c. Whether thatís a low end/quality tire I have no idea. Unfortunately I donít know the pressure in the tires right now. I assumed they gave it to me at the bike shop with the proper psi.

I am glad to hear that what I shared seems to just be a part of the learning process of riding the bike. Thank you again for your help!
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Old 04-10-20, 12:13 PM
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It is actually recommended to check pressure before every ride / every day - unlike car tires, bike tires will lose pressure much faster. So you need a pump and a manometer. And no, it is actually a pretty safe bet that they didn't give the bike to you with the proper psi as it depends on the type of roads you are riding and on your weight (weight of a bike + everything it carries). Most probably they just pumped the tires close to the max to be safe (for a very heavy load).
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Old 04-10-20, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Ferji425 View Post
Thank you for your input! I had to look up the details online as for the tires. It has Bontrager H5, wire bead, 30 tpi, 700x45c. Whether thatís a low end/quality tire I have no idea. Unfortunately I donít know the pressure in the tires right now. I assumed they gave it to me at the bike shop with the proper psi.

I am glad to hear that what I shared seems to just be a part of the learning process of riding the bike. Thank you again for your help!
You need to check your tires regularly and top them off as they will lose a little bit of air over time. I check my tires before every ride, just so I know my tires are at the optimal pressure. So you need to get a floor pump.
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Old 04-10-20, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Ferji425 View Post
So I got my Trek Verve1 aka first ďgrown upĒ bike last Saturday. All I knew is I wanted to get some exercise and be comfortable while doing so. Also that I would be riding on sidewalks. I did some research before going to my local bike shop but honestly it was quite overwhelming. All I figured out was that a hybrid bike was best for what I wanted.

Iíve ridden all but one day since I got it and doing between 8-10 miles each time. Overall Iíve been comfortable and enjoying it. My bottom is less sore with each ride and just having fun getting exercise that doesnít feel like a chore.

My questioning comes from the following...
At times the sidewalks have cracks and are uneven making it a painful/uncomfortable ride. I do lift myself off the seat to help minimize it. Also Iíve had to ride on the grass if someone refuses to move to a side and either walks or rides right down the middle. On the grass even for the short distance it struggles.

Keep in mind again that I am a newbie. So after this week of riding Iíve just wondered should I have gotten something with suspension? Or is all this normal and I did make a good choice?

Thank you in advance for your help!
No, I don't think you made a mistake since you said you enjoy your bike. But if the pavement get kind of rough, you should get used to lifting yourself up as you approach a bump or crack to lessen the impact. Additionally, your bike has pretty high volume tires which should soak up a lot of the impact.

RIDING A BIKE ON SIDEWALKS IS DANGEROUS AND IN SOME AREAS, ILLEGAL. Finally, research your local laws. In many areas, it is illegal for an adult to ride on the sidewalk. Even in places where it is not, it is very dangerous to ride on sidewalks as you have to compete with pedestrians, some walking dogs, as well as cars pulling out of driveways, and intersections where, again, cars are not looking for cyclists moving at 10 to 15 mph. They are looking out for pedestrians walking at 3 mph.
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Old 04-10-20, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Oso Polar View Post
It is actually recommended to check pressure before every ride / every day - unlike car tires, bike tires will lose pressure much faster. So you need a pump and a manometer. And no, it is actually a pretty safe bet that they didn't give the bike to you with the proper psi as it depends on the type of roads you are riding and on your weight (weight of a bike + everything it carries). Most probably they just pumped the tires close to the max to be safe (for a very heavy load).
Makes sense. Have lots to learn. Haha. I do have a pump and at one point had a gauge just need to see if itís still around. I know the tires will show the psi. Do I aim for a number in the middle?
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Old 04-10-20, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
No, I don't think you made a mistake since you said you enjoy your bike. But if the pavement get kind of rough, you should get used to lifting yourself up as you approach a bump or crack to lessen the impact. Additionally, your bike has pretty high volume tires which should soak up a lot of the impact.

RIDING A BIKE ON SIDEWALKS IS DANGEROUS AND IN SOME AREAS, ILLEGAL. Finally, research your local laws. In many areas, it is illegal for an adult to ride on the sidewalk. Even in places where it is not, it is very dangerous to ride on sidewalks as you have to compete with pedestrians, some walking dogs, as well as cars pulling out of driveways, and intersections where, again, cars are not looking for cyclists moving at 10 to 15 mph. They are looking out for pedestrians walking at 3 mph.
Again no clue it could be illegal. I googled and itís okay in Florida. Most of the time itís long stretches without intersections and driveways. Riding on the roads scares me way more.

Yes, Iíve been practicing lifting myself up on those less than smooth sections!

Thank you 😊
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Old 04-10-20, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Ferji425 View Post
Makes sense. Have lots to learn. Haha. I do have a pump and at one point had a gauge just need to see if itís still around. I know the tires will show the psi. Do I aim for a number in the middle?
Check what the recommended max pressure is on the side of the tire. Back the pressure down about 10 psi from the max and see how it rides. When I get new tires I'm not too familiar with I will ride it for 2 or 3 times at a certain pressure and then adjust +/- 5 psi. You may want to experiment with the front being about 5 psi less than the rear. Find what works for you. If you do go too low you run the risk of the tire bottoming out and giving you what are called "pinch flats".
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Old 04-10-20, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Ferji425 View Post
Again no clue it could be illegal. I googled and itís okay in Florida. Most of the time itís long stretches without intersections and driveways. Riding on the roads scares me way more.

Yes, Iíve been practicing lifting myself up on those less than smooth sections!

Thank you 😊
I know Florida can be tough on cyclists because the roads really are kind of dangerous for cyclists, but I really don't like riding on sidewalks, either for the reasons I stated. Maybe do a bit of research and find some local bike paths or cycling routes that keep you away from busy traffic arteries.
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Old 04-10-20, 03:09 PM
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I love riding sidewalks when sections of road are narrow and unsafe. Then it is safer to ride the sidewalk. With 45mm tires you can even ride bad broken sidewalks and be comfortable. Enjoy your ride! You made a good choice.
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Old 04-10-20, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by TakingMyTime View Post
Check what the recommended max pressure is on the side of the tire. Back the pressure down about 10 psi from the max and see how it rides. When I get new tires I'm not too familiar with I will ride it for 2 or 3 times at a certain pressure and then adjust +/- 5 psi. You may want to experiment with the front being about 5 psi less than the rear. Find what works for you. If you do go too low you run the risk of the tire bottoming out and giving you what are called "pinch flats".
Thank you. Now I have something to go by 😊. I couldn’t find my gauge so I’ll definitely be buying one.
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Old 04-10-20, 03:23 PM
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with this tires you are sufficiently prepared to for cracks and grass (assuming grass is not super soggy). the only other thing i would suggest is to downshift if you are forced on grass
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Old 04-10-20, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
I know Florida can be tough on cyclists because the roads really are kind of dangerous for cyclists, but I really don't like riding on sidewalks, either for the reasons I stated. Maybe do a bit of research and find some local bike paths or cycling routes that keep you away from busy traffic arteries.
I am in South Florida so definitely can be crazy on the roads. I do have lots of options with parks around me but that will have to wait until it’s safe for them to be opened again. Thank you again for your advice....really appreciate it.
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Old 04-10-20, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Gconan View Post
I love riding sidewalks when sections of road are narrow and unsafe. Then it is safer to ride the sidewalk. With 45mm tires you can even ride bad broken sidewalks and be comfortable. Enjoy your ride! You made a good choice.
Thank you! That seems to be the common statement in regards to the tires taking the broken sidewalks comfortably. Does it just boil down to properly lifting myself off the seat? I know the first person commented about having to learn to ride properly and it taking time. What all does that entail because I think I am riding correctly. Lol. Something I did notice at first was my arms and hands (especially the right) was getting tired, sore or even numb. I realized I was gripping on tightly and just not relaxed in my upper body. Again, I haven’t been on a bike in years and I know I was a little nervous. But a few rides in and I can feel myself being more relaxed and aware of my posture and grip. Anything else I should be aware of?
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Old 04-10-20, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by rowerek View Post
with this tires you are sufficiently prepared to for cracks and grass (assuming grass is not super soggy). the only other thing i would suggest is to downshift if you are forced on grass
I haven’t downshifted in those few moments so thank you!
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Old 04-10-20, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Ferji425 View Post
Thank you! That seems to be the common statement in regards to the tires taking the broken sidewalks comfortably. Does it just boil down to properly lifting myself off the seat?
Yes. And unweighting the front before a bump. I like to stand going over broken sidewalk unweighting the front then rear going over them. Congratulations on your bike!
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Old 04-10-20, 08:33 PM
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Since I haven't seen it addressed, suspension has nothing to do with how well a bike can roll on grass / dirt. Early mountain bikes didn't have suspension and they road on grass / dirt just fine. As others have mentioned, it's with your tires and technique.

Look at how these guys ride without suspension

Modern suspension mountain bikes (good quality) do allow you to go faster and in more comfort on technical terrain, but grass is not technical.
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Old 04-11-20, 01:25 AM
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Originally Posted by katsup View Post
Since I haven't seen it addressed, suspension has nothing to do with how well a bike can roll on grass / dirt. Early mountain bikes didn't have suspension and they road on grass / dirt just fine. As others have mentioned, it's with your tires and technique.

Look at how these guys ride without suspension

Modern suspension mountain bikes (good quality) do allow you to go faster and in more comfort on technical terrain, but grass is not technical.
Wow! That was of course incredibly impressive. For me even just the way he mounted the bike left me impressed. Lol. I am getting better but I have to tilt it and then get my leg over which sometimes is easier than others. Thank you for the lesson on suspension 😊. Everyone has been so kind to help.
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Old 04-13-20, 07:57 AM
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Been a while since I rode the Verve. Check psi range on side of tire. I think it was 60-80 psi. Ride was more comfortable at 70 psi and harsher at 80 psi.
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