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Hybrid - front suspension or not for wrist injury?

Old 05-14-20, 03:58 AM
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Marcolino
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Hybrid - front suspension or not for wrist injury?

Hello all!

Brand new to the forum - what a wealth of knowledge! Like the rest of the world during these times, I'm considering a bike. Started some research, though made more difficult given you can't really test ride anything. I have a short (well, long) list for my price-range which is <500 (and am happy buying used for less).

I'm a little stuck on the question of whether front suspension is needed, so was hoping for some opinions/guidance? A few things below which might help:
  • I plan to ride largely for fun & exercise, not for racing around. But have opted for Hybrid rather than MTB.
  • Live in London. So will be a lot of roads, though I do plan to take paths/trails and take it out of the city for that purpose. But not "proper" MTB terrain.
  • I've had a bunch of surgeries on my right wrist. It's fine, but where possible would like to reduce amount of stress/jarring/vibration.
  • So despite lots of reading, somewhat unsure whether front suspension will help, or if it will make no material difference as long as I have a decent tire width (36-40). If relevant, I'm not too fussed about the extra 2kg of weight. Sure, lighter is better, but I don't need a fast commuter bike, so it's probably not that big a deal
Hopefully that's enough info. I've seen lots of recommendations for the usual suspects - Carrera Subway 2, Specialized Sirrus/Crosstrail, Giant Escape 2, Pinnacle Lithium 4, Cube Nature, Ridgeback Storm, Voodoo Agwe/Marasa, Canondale Quick CX etc etc.

Oh, and I realise the Decathlon bikes are missing there! They look good (and I like Decathlon), but would rather buy from a bike shop, and I also understand they can be a little harder to repair should the need arise). In any event, I'm sure any of the bikes above could work from my, so the list is long enough!

Thank you, and hope everyone is keeping well!
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Old 05-14-20, 04:32 AM
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alo
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I suggest get front suspension. Also you have less weight on your hands if your handlebars are higher. You could look for a bike with high handlebars, or raise the handlebars.
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Old 05-14-20, 05:08 AM
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That's a good tip re the higher handlebars, hadn't thought of that. Thanks Alo.
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Old 05-14-20, 06:02 AM
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Front suspension can certainly help. I have a Giant Roam...similar to the Cannondale Quick CX and Specialized Crosstrail that you're considering. There is a notable difference in having the fork locked or unlocked, and this is noticeable on most terrain. It's commonly said that suspension won't do anything on paved surfaces, but I find it nice to have for driveway cuts, manhole covers, etc.

Is it necessary? No, of course not. But we're already talking about elective equipment (bikes) for recreation and exercise. My recommendation is to make it as enjoyable and as satisfying as you can. I own bikes with front suspension and without, and there are advantages and disadvantages to both. I think you would enjoy having it.
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Old 05-14-20, 06:06 AM
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Another option would be a suspension stem; they are cheaper, lighter, and easy to adapt to any bike

In the early 90s, there were two philosophies on MTB suspension: "suspend the rider" (susp stem) or "suspend the bike" (susp fork). "Suspend the bike" won out due to increased traction, but suspension stems do provide comfort. Suspension stems are slowly being marketed again for road and gravel use where weight, complexity, and stack height are important; and traction is not.
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Old 05-14-20, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by hokiefyd View Post
Front suspension can certainly help. I have a Giant Roam...similar to the Cannondale Quick CX and Specialized Crosstrail that you're considering. There is a notable difference in having the fork locked or unlocked, and this is noticeable on most terrain. It's commonly said that suspension won't do anything on paved surfaces, but I find it nice to have for driveway cuts, manhole covers, etc.

Is it necessary? No, of course not. But we're already talking about elective equipment (bikes) for recreation and exercise. My recommendation is to make it as enjoyable and as satisfying as you can. I own bikes with front suspension and without, and there are advantages and disadvantages to both. I think you would enjoy having it.
Thank you, Hokiefyd, that's a super helpful post! Makes a lot of sense. If it helps me, even at the margin, it's probably no bad thing. Other than renting bikes on holiday, I haven't owned a bike in about 20 years. Whatever I get is going to feel a MASSIVE upgrade to anything I've had before, so the weight isn't really an issue (I have no point of comparison), and having some extra flexibility is nice.
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Old 05-14-20, 07:54 AM
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I agree with hokiefyd - suspension fork is not a necessity, but can be good to have, if you're not too concerned about the weight. Some other items that can help with hand comfort are ergonomic grips, bar-ends for varying hand position, and gel-padded gloves.
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Old 05-14-20, 08:24 AM
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Marcolino
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
I agree with hokiefyd - suspension fork is not a necessity, but can be good to have, if you're not too concerned about the weight. Some other items that can help with hand comfort are ergonomic grips, bar-ends for varying hand position, and gel-padded gloves.
Thank you, Subgrade, for the recommendations! Looks like front suspension may be the way to go for me then.

Finding a bike in stock is going to be the challenge now!
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Old 05-14-20, 07:32 PM
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My 2 cents.....forgo the suspension. Saves you the weight/maintenance and the $$ can go towards better components and/or accessories eg helmet. Instead, buy a bike with wider tires and adjust the tire pressure until you find a compromise between comfort and performance.

To protect your wrist get a soft brace, athletic tensor band etc. Even a pair of decent gel padded gloves would do wonders. Good luck with your search and my advise is worth as much as you paid for it ......
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Old 05-15-20, 02:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Speedway2 View Post
My 2 cents.....forgo the suspension. Saves you the weight/maintenance and the $$ can go towards better components and/or accessories eg helmet. Instead, buy a bike with wider tires and adjust the tire pressure until you find a compromise between comfort and performance.

To protect your wrist get a soft brace, athletic tensor band etc. Even a pair of decent gel padded gloves would do wonders. Good luck with your search and my advise is worth as much as you paid for it ......
Thanks, Speedway, appreciate the suggestion! Early days, but for the bikes I've looked at, seems like the ones with front suspension come with notably wider tyres than the ones without. But I'll keep looking!
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Old 05-15-20, 04:55 AM
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Should we assume your physician, surgeon, etc. has given you the green light to start cycling?
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Old 05-15-20, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
Should we assume your physician, surgeon, etc. has given you the green light to start cycling?
Ha, yes, no issues there! My last operation was years ago (from tennis, and had to stop playing unfortunately), but as long as I avoid doing anything particularly idiotic, I'll be fine.

Also just noticed that at 5'10 / 178cm I'm at the top end of Medium, and lower end of Large sized frames. Given the largely, err, "relaxed" nature of the riding I'm mostly going to be doing, I assume that rounding down to the Medium would be the smart move? (If relevant, I weigh next to nothing).
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Old 05-15-20, 05:14 AM
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Old 05-15-20, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Marcolino View Post
Ha, yes, no issues there! My last operation was years ago (from tennis, and had to stop playing unfortunately), but as long as I avoid doing anything particularly idiotic, I'll be fine.

Also just noticed that at 5'10 / 178cm I'm at the top end of Medium, and lower end of Large sized frames. Given the largely, err, "relaxed" nature of the riding I'm mostly going to be doing, I assume that rounding down to the Medium would be the smart move? (If relevant, I weigh next to nothing).
I'm a little shorter than you. Can't speak for all the other brands mentioned, but before virus "isolation", I was looking at a Trek FX 3--the medium was much too small, the large fit just right. The "same" sizes from diff. brands may vary in the way they feel, so if possible, get a test ride. Happy Hunting!
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Old 05-15-20, 07:48 AM
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Marcolino
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Originally Posted by freeranger View Post
I'm a little shorter than you. Can't speak for all the other brands mentioned, but before virus "isolation", I was looking at a Trek FX 3--the medium was much too small, the large fit just right. The "same" sizes from diff. brands may vary in the way they feel, so if possible, get a test ride. Happy Hunting!
Helpful tip, freeranger, especially as the Trek Dual Sport 2 was another bike I came across. Thanks!
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Old 05-16-20, 09:23 AM
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Out of interest, has anyone come across the Whyte brand? Can't seem to find an awful lot about them.

Have spotted the Ridgeway for 489 (discountcyclesdirect), and it seems to have similar specs to the Giant Roam 2 which is at 575, but can no find no commentary on it at all!
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Old 05-16-20, 06:01 PM
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Was about to tell you that Whyte is not in the USA, so many of us would not have info for you on it.....when googling it, found...yes it is in the U.S. https://www.whyteusa.bike/

Learn something new everyday. I have no knowledge of the bike though.

My 2cents I was going to put in, if you can afford it and want a more comfortable ride, get an air shock. It is more expensive, but gives you a greater ability to adjust the shock to your comfort level. I have read that the Europeans have a greater amount of front shocks available to them on hybrid bikes than we do in the U.S. There are actually some nice Suntour AirShocks for hybrids that I see on bikes like the Canyon Pathlite's.

EDIT: Ok, did a quick money conversion, 500 pounds is about equivalent to $600. Not really sure of what new bikes are available to you in your market for that price range. Might be best to visit a LBS.

OK, EDIT number 2 and hopefully last The Ridgeway you listed, that's nice. Seems to me a good deal. Frame looks familiar, but not sure what other bike manufacturer that uses it.

Last edited by travbikeman; 05-16-20 at 06:15 PM.
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Old 05-17-20, 02:15 AM
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Thanks, Travbikeman!

That Canyon looks nice, but at 750 it's out of budget unfortunately. I think my range is 500-600 new (fat chance of find a used one now). So $600-$725. The potentials are as follows:

Specialized Crosstrail (575)
Giant Roam 2 (575)
Trek DS 2 (525)
Cube Nature (500)
Whyte Ridgeway (490)
Marin San Rafael DS2 (500) / DS3 (600) (I read that Marin and Whyte had the same designer/owner in the past)
Pinnacle Cobalt 2 (520)

I know I'm overthinking, that they are all fairly similar, and the smart advice would just be "go and try a couple, pick whichever one feels the best." It's just hard without that option in lockdown!
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Old 05-18-20, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Marcolino View Post
Ha, yes, no issues there! My last operation was years ago (from tennis, and had to stop playing unfortunately), but as long as I avoid doing anything particularly idiotic, I'll be fine.

Also just noticed that at 5'10 / 178cm I'm at the top end of Medium, and lower end of Large sized frames. Given the largely, err, "relaxed" nature of the riding I'm mostly going to be doing, I assume that rounding down to the Medium would be the smart move? (If relevant, I weigh next to nothing).

I'm sized between Small and Medium frame sizing on Specialized Sirrus hybrid models, I sized both and bought the Small based exactly on the ride position / posture you describe . . . I'm 5 feet 6 inches, and weigh 145-150 lbs, I test-rode both sizes and found the Small to be better handling for me as a smaller rider. For FIT, I went with Small rather than Medium. My Specialized road bike is a 52cm frame and I love the way that fits me for road riding.

On the WRIST question . . . well, this Sirrus X model 4.0 which I just bought has the Specialized suspension stem / headset called Future Shock. It grants some minimal suspension and I'm glad to have it but it's NOT the same cushioning you should get from a suspension fork.
I rode yesterday on a 45km rocky / gnarly gravel ride and yes I could have benefitted from a suspension fork for my wrist, which is healing from a sprain incurred by recently crashing on my road bike.
My injury is minor and temporary, so I do not yet have long-term concerns about my wrist. However, if your wrist is always going to be at risk to riding stress, yes I would consider a suspension fork.

Canyon Pathlite was my alternate choice bike, it has a suspension fork but my sizing has not been available for several moths and the avail date per Canyon website keeps moving later and later, so I bought the Sirrus X.
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Old 05-19-20, 04:19 AM
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Originally Posted by jimmyodonnell View Post
I'm sized between Small and Medium frame sizing on Specialized Sirrus hybrid models, I sized both and bought the Small based exactly on the ride position / posture you describe . . . I'm 5 feet 6 inches, and weigh 145-150 lbs, I test-rode both sizes and found the Small to be better handling for me as a smaller rider. For FIT, I went with Small rather than Medium. My Specialized road bike is a 52cm frame and I love the way that fits me for road riding.

On the WRIST question . . . well, this Sirrus X model 4.0 which I just bought has the Specialized suspension stem / headset called Future Shock. It grants some minimal suspension and I'm glad to have it but it's NOT the same cushioning you should get from a suspension fork.
I rode yesterday on a 45km rocky / gnarly gravel ride and yes I could have benefitted from a suspension fork for my wrist, which is healing from a sprain incurred by recently crashing on my road bike.
My injury is minor and temporary, so I do not yet have long-term concerns about my wrist. However, if your wrist is always going to be at risk to riding stress, yes I would consider a suspension fork.

Canyon Pathlite was my alternate choice bike, it has a suspension fork but my sizing has not been available for several moths and the avail date per Canyon website keeps moving later and later, so I bought the Sirrus X.

Hi Jimmy, that's super helpful intel, thanks! I think I'm going to be a rather more recreational/infrequent rider than you (the odds of me doing a 45km rocky/gnarly gravel ride are as close to 0% as imaginable!). I guess I'll just have to see how I go, but I suspect i'll be fine. As others have said, the suspension fork might not be necessary, but if it gives me peace of mind, it'll worth it - I'm a great believe in the placebo effect :-)

I've narrowed it down to the Pinnacle Cobalt 2 and the Whyte Ridgeway. VERY similar specs. The Pinnacle will be pre-built, but 18-21 days, whereas the Whyte would need partial assembly but with quick delivery. Could be fun to learn how to build & maintain.
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Old 05-19-20, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Marcolino View Post
Hi Jimmy, that's super helpful intel, thanks! I think I'm going to be a rather more recreational/infrequent rider than you (the odds of me doing a 45km rocky/gnarly gravel ride are as close to 0% as imaginable!). I guess I'll just have to see how I go, but I suspect i'll be fine. As others have said, the suspension fork might not be necessary, but if it gives me peace of mind, it'll worth it - I'm a great believe in the placebo effect :-)

I've narrowed it down to the Pinnacle Cobalt 2 and the Whyte Ridgeway. VERY similar specs. The Pinnacle will be pre-built, but 18-21 days, whereas the Whyte would need partial assembly but with quick delivery. Could be fun to learn how to build & maintain.
All else being equal, pick one from the shop you like best, as you will be dealing with them. And yes, if you're in between sizes, go with the smaller one; you can always adjust the fit.
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Old 05-22-20, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
All else being equal, pick one from the shop you like best, as you will be dealing with them. And yes, if you're in between sizes, go with the smaller one; you can always adjust the fit.

Thanks Korina, good advice!

I went for the Ridgeway in the end. I've assembled it (hopefully well :-), so all that is left is to pump up the tires and take it for a spin.

Thanks to everyone here who has offered advice and expertise!
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Old 05-22-20, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Marcolino View Post
Thanks Korina, good advice!

I went for the Ridgeway in the end. I've assembled it (hopefully well :-), so all that is left is to pump up the tires and take it for a spin.

Thanks to everyone here who has offered advice and expertise!
Great! I'm just glad someone learned from my mistake. Also, pictures. We all want pictures!
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Old 05-22-20, 01:55 PM
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Lots of great advice given so far. I got my first bike last year and went to my local bike store and bought a Giant Roam 2. I'm based in London too and managed to get a good deal through the cycle to work scheme. If your employer can support you with that, it is worth a look.

I have had a slight discomfort in my wrist over the last few years and when I tested various bikes I found the suspension more comfortable. In addition, I found investing in decent gloves with cushioning was beneficial. I've since bought a cheaper full finger pair for winter and found decent cushioning was a must on the palm of your hands.

Another upgrade I made to my bike is adding bar ends. When out on the open road they are much more comfortable and I'm glad I made that upgrade.
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Old 05-24-20, 06:46 AM
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my dream of cycling
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