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Trek DS2 Urban/Road Tire Alternative

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Trek DS2 Urban/Road Tire Alternative

Old 07-15-20, 02:14 PM
  #1  
Jon760
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Trek DS2 Urban/Road Tire Alternative

Hello,

I am new to this forum and happy to find a section dedicated to hybrid bikes. I currently have a 2018 Trek Dual Sport 2 with 700 x 38c tires.
Because I purely ride on an all- paved trail (10-mile pure asphalt bike trail), I wonder if I can (#1 ) replace my tires with those that are more tuned to an asphalt surface, such as road bikes?
Those tires with barely or no teeth at all. If so, (#2 ) could I get narrow profile such as 700 x 32c or should I stick with 700 x 38c size? If questions #1 and #2 are possible, (#3) what parts and size do I need to replace such as tubes?

Do you have recommendations? Thank you for your thoughts and suggestions.

These are the specs for my Trek DS 2:

​​​​​​​Tyres Bontrager LT2, 700x38c
Rims Bontrager AT-750 32-hole double-walled alloy
Front Hub Formula DC20 alloy Rear Hub Formula DC22 alloy
Frame Alpha Gold Aluminium, DuoTrap S compatible, rack and mudguard mounts
Fork SR Suntour NEX, coil spring, preload, hydraulic lockout, 63mm travel
Front Derailleur Shimano Tourney TY71
Rear Derailleur Shimano Acera M360
Number of Gears 24 Shifters Shimano Altus M310, 8-speed Chain set Forged alloy, 48/38/28 w/chainguard
Bottom Bracket Sealed cartridge
Cassette Shimano HG31, 11-32, 8-speed
Chain KMC Z7
Pedals Supplied
Brakeset Tektro M285 hydraulic disc
Handlebars Bontrager alloy Stem Bontrager alloy, 31.8mm, 7mm rise, Blendr compatible
Headset 1-1/8" threadless, sealed cartridge bearings
Grips Bontrager Satellite, ergonomic
Saddle Bontrager Sport
Seatpost Bontrager SSR, 2-bolt head, 27.2mm, 12mm offset Weight 13.45 kg (19 inch)
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Old 07-16-20, 02:21 PM
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Aerzon
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I know there are tires made for hybrids that resemble road tires more. (Sort of like slicks) If I were you, just look up your tire size with "hybrid slicks" after it. Alternatively look up Kenda tires, I checked out some more "asphalt" style treaded tires that I was thinking of putting on my own hybrid. I'm not sure if they carry them in the 700cc size though.

As far as the tire width goes, I'm less help there. I know some do play around with different width on the same wheels. I think it can be a trial and error thing, but the forum itself should have info on that if you do a quick search.

cheers. Hope I was any help at all.
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Old 07-16-20, 03:47 PM
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I'd stay with the 38mm size (or even larger) but mostly slick. Skinnier tires will not get you much performance increase unless you're going fast, in which case better aerodynamics of the skinnier tire become more pronounced. All other variables being equal, the fatter tire will have less rolling resistance than the skinnier tire.

Panaracer Gravelking (not the Gravelking SK) is one option for a medium weight slick. For better rolling resistance, lighter weight, and smoother ride (and more money), there are the lightweight tires from Rene Herse. https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...8-barlow-pass/
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Old 07-16-20, 05:02 PM
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Wider tires have less rolling resistance? I learn something new everyday. I would've figured more surface area contacting the road would mean more resistance.
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Old 07-16-20, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Aerzon View Post
Wider tires have less rolling resistance? I learn something new everyday. I would've figured more surface area contacting the road would mean more resistance.
The surface area itself doesn't change significantly, but the shape of the contact patch does, and so does the tire's deformation profile as it rolls. A wider tire will have a wider patch left-to-right, but a shorter one front-to-back. A narrower tire will have a narrower patch left-to-right, but a longer one front-to-back. As I understand it, the theory is the wider tire's shorter patch (longitudinally) is in contact with the road for less time with less deformation. A shorter period of contact with the road as the tire rolls results in less energy-absorbing deformation.

But this is keeping inflation pressure equal (ex. 60 psi in a narrow tire and 60 psi in a wide tire). You'd not want to run the same inflation pressure in a wide tire -- you'd want to lower it. In the end, and depending on a significant number of variables, the wider tire CAN represent a lower rolling resistance than a narrower tire, but there's so much overlap that generalizations really can't be made.

Here is one article that mentions this (the shorter contact patch), but there's a pretty wide (pardon the pun) body of knowledge out there...not all of it in agreement. Take away -- it's complex.

Last edited by hokiefyd; 07-17-20 at 06:31 PM. Reason: Spelling correction (path -> patch)
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Old 07-17-20, 05:30 PM
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Since you're riding primarily on paved roads... go ahead and put a pair of Bontrager Hard Case Lite tires in 700x32. Or for that matter, any quality 700x32mm width tire. You'll definitely feel the difference.
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Old 07-20-20, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by TakingMyTime View Post
Since you're riding primarily on paved roads... go ahead and put a pair of Bontrager Hard Case Lite tires in 700x32. Or for that matter, any quality 700x32mm width tire. You'll definitely feel the difference.
Awesome thank you. That is where I wanted to be. Heavily toothed tires feel like a drag even with tailwind pushing you. I think I 'll stick with 38 for now to keep my current tube.

Last edited by Jon760; 07-20-20 at 11:29 AM.
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Old 07-20-20, 11:21 AM
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Thanks!
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Old 07-20-20, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
I'd stay with the 38mm size (or even larger) but mostly slick. Skinnier tires will not get you much performance increase unless you're going fast, in which case better aerodynamics of the skinnier tire become more pronounced. All other variables being equal, the fatter tire will have less rolling resistance than the skinnier tire.

Panaracer Gravelking (not the Gravelking SK) is one option for a medium weight slick. For better rolling resistance, lighter weight, and smoother ride (and more money), there are the lightweight tires from Rene Herse. \
Thank you! I wonder if this would work as substitute: Panaracer Pasela ProTite 700c x 38?
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Old 07-20-20, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Jon760 View Post
Thank you! I wonder if this would work as substitute: Panaracer Pasela ProTite 700c x 38?
Sure that would work.
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Old 07-21-20, 05:39 AM
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In theory, the standard version of the Pasela (non-ProTite, with the red label on the sidewall) would ride even better as it doesn't have the puncture protection layer the ProTite does. I'm not sure I've seen the two tires reviewed side-by-side, so I'm not sure how much of a difference it actually makes in practice.
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Old 07-21-20, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Jon760 View Post
Thank you! I wonder if this would work as substitute: Panaracer Pasela ProTite 700c x 38?
Paselas are great city tires, but now there are better choices for pure asphalt at that size. For speed, don't look at "city/trekking" tires, but look at "cross/gravel" tires with a road bias. The popularity of "gravel" riding is leading to great tires for hybrid usage, Paselas were good for their time but now there are more options.

I've used Paselas in the past for mixed use; my gravel bike now has 38c Soma Vitesse EX and I am digging them for their comfort and speed; much better on tarmac than Paselas IMO.
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Old 07-21-20, 07:43 AM
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Another interesting tire is the Vittoria Terreno Zero. I have these in the 47-584 size, but they're also available in 40-622. With their slick tread, they're pretty dadgum fast! For a little more bite, the trusty Continental Speed Rides are also available (marked as 42mm, but are a true 38mm tire) at a much lower cost (about $25/tire). There's something good for all budgets in this market segment.
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