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Cannondale Quick 1

Old 08-25-11, 03:18 PM
  #26  
ColinL
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Originally Posted by qmsdc15 View Post
You have a lot of opinions, I agree with most of them. I hope you will continue to post in the hybrid forum, but telling hybrid riders they should use drop bars (unless they ask) is insulting. Don't assume you know more than the person you're talking to.

I rode drop bars before you were born.
This person hasn't purchased a bike yet. It could benefit the person to solicit multiple opinions, including ones that may suggest a different bicycle than currently being considered. I will however endeavor to make it less argumentative and more informational in nature.

Regarding age-- oh, come on man. That was a valid argument when I was 16, not at 36. I think we're all adults here. You have more time in bicycles, yes, and that can often be valuable-- but it doesn't give you an "I'm always right" card in any discussion.
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Old 08-25-11, 04:37 PM
  #27  
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Its a great bike for the price I got it at. I just need something lighter for the hills I avoid on my commute home.
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Old 08-25-11, 04:59 PM
  #28  
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The Transeo looks like one of my bikes, a heavy hardtail MTB, which I use as a commuter/utility bike.

I really like the hydraulic disc brakes but would prefer a rigid fork. For all-weather commuting I'd be looking for a bike with these features. A Headshok might be worth the weight, but normal suspension fork, probably has more travel than you need and more weight than you want.
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Old 08-25-11, 05:57 PM
  #29  
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I commuted for a year on a Specialized Sirrus, carbon fork aluminum frame, "conventional" brakes - very good commuter, brutal in a head wind. IMO, I don't get disc brakes and suspension forks for on-road bikes, but to each their own.

A $2k budget for a hybrid is big. The Giant Seek 1 has disc brakes and a steel fork, and will prolly handle abuse fine, and is $900. And it is sharp looking. I don't own one, but it was my regret in not at least looking at when I got the Sirrus.

To give you some feel for what you can get for that kind of money, I bought an alum frame, replaced it today with an alum frame with carbon seat & chain stays, all SRAM X9 shifters and derailleurs, a SRAM road crank, Easton EA50 wheels, a carbon fork, carbon seatpost, $100 seat, ergon carbon grips - and spent right about $1000 for all of it - bought new, no e-bay stuff. And Rival brakes, almost forgot those.. best buy of the bunch.
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Old 08-25-11, 06:43 PM
  #30  
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"I don't get disc brakes" on on-road bikes.
@RollNYC ... I get the sentiment, completely, but I think you'll see that they start appearing very soon (2013 or 2014 latest) on full-on road/road race bikes.
The UIC has already 'legalized' 'em for 'cross; it's (really) just a matter of time before they do so for road racing.
There's already a company (in the States, I think; can't remember the name) producing full cf road bikes disc only; they will sell.
They make an awful lot of sense in many ways (modulation; rim wear/weight); when (I think it's inevitable) one of the big gruppo mfgs (e.g. Shimano) jump on board, and produce an electronic/hydraulic brifter, the days of rim braking on road race bikes are numbered.
Just sayin'
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Old 08-26-11, 07:34 AM
  #31  
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The big thing I dislike about discs is that they frequently get out of alignment and drag. Initially it's just a little, but then it becomes a lot and you have to unbolt and hold in new place or add/remove shims, then tighten back down. My experience is with Hayes, Tektro and Shimano mid-low end stuff. If expensive calipers don't do this then I will have to seriously consider upgrading my Quick CX at some point.

Meanwhile my v-brakes almost never drag and if they did get bumped somehow, it takes 2 seconds to move them back by hand.
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Old 08-26-11, 08:03 AM
  #32  
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The big thing I like with the discs on my hybrid (apart from the superb stopping power in the wet) is that they never clog up with mud. My wife and I go on tours that will sometimes involve towpath or gravel and muddy back roads Being in the UK, and getting quite a bit of rain, which you can't avoid when travelling from A to B, I've lost count of the number of times I had to clear or re-align her V-brakes. Usually in a downpour on a slope. I have never had any problems with my discs. We ended up buying her a bike with discs as well. No problems with alignment so far. She loves them as well.
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Old 08-26-11, 12:18 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
The big thing I dislike about discs is that they frequently get out of alignment and drag. Initially it's just a little, but then it becomes a lot and you have to unbolt and hold in new place or add/remove shims, then tighten back down. My experience is with Hayes, Tektro and Shimano mid-low end stuff. If expensive calipers don't do this then I will have to seriously consider upgrading my Quick CX at some point.

Meanwhile my v-brakes almost never drag and if they did get bumped somehow, it takes 2 seconds to move them back by hand.
That is true, to some extent, for the more inexpensive disc systems, both mechanical and hydraulic. I remember the Hayes SO1s (or something) that came stock on my Giant Rainier ... ugh!
However, Avid BB7s (which I now use on my mtb) and/or any decent, modern dual-piston hydraulic discs certainly don't have many, if any, such issues any longer. Pretty much 'set and forget' other than changing pads when required.

OTOH, I'm more than happy with the v-brake set-up on my Sirrus, though I did get there by changing out the stock junk for TRP CX9 ones (with Avid levers). They work beautifully, sun or rain; about as good as rim braking can get, I think. But as I suggested above, I do think it's the beginning of the end for rim brakes even on road race bikes ... just a matter of time.
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Old 08-26-11, 01:10 PM
  #34  
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To the OP, I apologize for thread diversion with my disc brake comments. Thought it would be okay by saying IMO, maybe IMHO would have helped.. haha.

But to continue the diversion, I understand the benefits of mud clearance, but I don't hit much mud on the road. Of course they stop better in the rain, but so what. My car stops better in the rain. Riding in the rain and adjusting for the braking changes and traction changes (slippery white lines) is just part of riding. I know an awful lot of riders who are exclusively fair weather, and I know other riders who shouldn't ride in the rain due to their skill level, they scare me in the dry. Improving wet braking seems like it is playing to the least common denominator, and perhaps getting folks in over their heads, or potentially skill.

If someone wants to sell new road bikes or race bikes with them, grand. But 135mm hubs aren't going to play well with the overwhelming majority of 130mm forks and rear ends in the market place. Maybe they have 130 mm disc hubs, and I just missed it. I also believe that more pieces make more complexity, and it seems like disc brakes have more pieces than rim. Maybe I'm missing that.
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Old 08-26-11, 01:54 PM
  #35  
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... and to continue the diversion ...

"If someone wants to sell new road bikes or race bikes with them, grand. But 135mm hubs aren't going to play well with the overwhelming majority of 130mm forks and rear ends in the market place. Maybe they have 130 mm disc hubs, and I just missed it. I also believe that more pieces make more complexity, and it seems like disc brakes have more pieces than rim. Maybe I'm missing that."

I agree; in fact I agree with virtually everything you've said on this point, but ... 'marketing' will prevail! Sticking with road racing/rr bikes, it doesn't really matter (to my way of thinking) whether they (pros or others) 'need' discs, just as (for example) it hasn't really mattered that they/we don't 'need' the many different bb sizes/crank-bb interfaces now proliferating, or tapered headtube standards, or electronic shifting for that matter (first DuraAce, now Ultegra, next 105; Campy/SRAM will inevitably follow).

What matters (from a marketing point of view) is the opportunity to spark demand for the 'next thing' ... discs on road/racing bikes is an obvious 'next thing' after electronic shifting: new components, new wheels, new frames ... think of the $$$ possibilities!
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Old 08-26-11, 04:43 PM
  #36  
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Much less maintenance on the disc brakes.

If you ride in the rain, rim brakes will make a filthy mess of your wheels. It doesn't require mud, just add water.

Last edited by qmsdc15; 08-26-11 at 04:47 PM.
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Old 08-26-11, 05:46 PM
  #37  
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Absolutely, Marketing and R&D drive the "need" for bike improvements, and some of them are. And I love it when folks talk about 105 being entry level. What about 2300 and Sora as entry level? Another beautiful up sell.

And qmsdc, I am sure there are many pro's to disc brakes, and they are a wonderful fit for a hybrid bike, especially if used as intended. I was only saying, IMHO, on an exclusively road bike, they may potentially be overkill. If the OP wants them, the OP should get them. A bike one likes gets ridden.
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Old 08-26-11, 06:04 PM
  #38  
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I used to wash my wheels a lot.

Fixing a flat on a wheel covered with that black stuff that comes from using rim brakes is unpleasant. It makes your hands black. What is that black stuff? Aluminum?

If you enjoy frequently replacing and even more frequently adjusting brake pads, you might not like disc brakes which are essentially maintenance-free.
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Old 08-26-11, 08:57 PM
  #39  
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I have never noticed a great deal of black stuff on the rims. I notice a bit when I wash the bike, but I like it cause it comes off easy and I can tell what spots I hit. I have never noticed a great deal of maintenance with rim brakes. I change pads typically once a season, but this is only my 2nd season riding after 22 years out of the sport. I know you were riding before I was born, so will defer to your experience.

What I really want to know is how does light oil placed on a chain, in sparing quantities, become industrial grease after one stinking ride. I am trying dry film lube now, but expect limited to no improvement.
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Old 08-27-11, 10:34 AM
  #40  
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Once a season is four times a year.

You're still using a chain? Nasty stuff. Belt drive is the way to go.
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Old 08-27-11, 01:35 PM
  #41  
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The black stuff on the rims is probably a combination of brake pad dust, water and road grime.


Sooooo uh, yeah, about that Quick 1. Fast bike.
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Old 08-27-11, 04:46 PM
  #42  
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I have made my decision! For a while now I have studied different bike brands offering different hybrid bikes at many price ranges. My conclusion.....There is no such thing as a bike to do it all (road/off-road). So I put a deposit down on my new recreational bike for those smooth park trails. The 2012 Jamis Quest with the optional triple 50/39/30T. Was told it would come out in mid November maybe earlier. For my commute I purchased a Jamis Exile 1. Not the best 29er on the market but has great potential. I purchased fenders, pedals, and Serfas road tires all for a great deal. All the other gear like head and tail lights ect. can be transferred from the Transeo. Thanks for the help everyone.
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Old 09-07-11, 12:56 PM
  #43  
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Have you looked considered the Trek Mendota? I have one and I love it. Alum frame, disc brakes, carbon fork, all for around 25 LBS. Plus if I didn't remember incorrectly, it has slightly better components than the Quick 1.

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...city/mendota/#
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Old 09-07-11, 01:04 PM
  #44  
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The Mendota has MTB drivetrain whereas the Quick 1 has road. The Quick 1 also has fewer spoked wheels which usually (but not universally) implies they are lighter. I would bet the Quick 1 is several pounds lighter.


The OP said he bought a 29er MTB and a road bike. That is a smart call, assuming you have the budget flexibility to do it.
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Old 09-11-11, 07:50 AM
  #45  
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I did check out the Mendota, and just about every single bicycle worth while in the hybrid class. I am still happy with my decision to go with a MTB. I finally took some pictures of it ill have them posted soon. If anything I would like a MTB with Reynolds 853 and no suspension fork for my commute. Any suggestions? I'm also considering a custom build but just don't have the time or money for that right now. When i'm flying down some bumpy hills faster than cars, and hit bumps the frame on the Exile 1 will give your arms a violent shake. I figure ill get one of these in a little while to help with that.

https://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebik...n650_spec.html

https://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebik...race_spec.html

Both are considerably lighter than my current 2011 Jamis Exile 1 (6lbs.), and have a solid steel frame that'll mock any ditch or potholes. Nothing wrong with a hybrid bike tho. What matters in your decision is your surroundings. I live in New Jersey along some of the most densely populated areas. I have some really really bad roads here, and angry rush hour commuters that will give you absolutely no space on the road forcing you to hit some sidewalks or rough terrain. Thanks for all the support laddies and gents.
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Old 09-11-11, 09:09 AM
  #46  
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front and rear fenders, new gel saddle, Night rider head light, cat eye tail light, Shimano A530 Sport/Touring Road Pedals, Serfas Drifter city tires, and my bell
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Old 09-12-11, 05:53 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by qmsdc15 View Post
If you enjoy frequently replacing and even more frequently adjusting brake pads, you might not like disc brakes which are essentially maintenance-free.
Huh? I recently switched from a hybrid with discs to a hybrid with v brakes. I was constantly adjusting the disc brakes-they used to rub the rims. I found it impossible to keep them well adjusted.

The v brakes...I haven't touched them since buying the bike.

I guess the point I'm making is that one persons opinion don't make a fact.
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Old 09-12-11, 06:05 AM
  #48  
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I ride a lot and in all weather. Brakes that are used less, need less frequent service. I recently replaced pads on a V-brake. My disc brakes have gone a year without service. It is not my opinion that I need to adjust V-brakes as the pads wear. The pads position relative to the rim must be adjusted frequently as the rubber gets worn down and the pads need to be replaced regularly as the pads wear out. Your mileage may vary.

There is no way a pair of V-brakes could have functioned well over the last four working days here in DC without adjustment. (It rained every day). Four days vs. one year. Do the math.

Last edited by qmsdc15; 09-12-11 at 06:11 AM.
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Old 09-13-11, 08:36 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by qmsdc15 View Post
I ride a lot and in all weather. Brakes that are used less, need less frequent service. I recently replaced pads on a V-brake. My disc brakes have gone a year without service. It is not my opinion that I need to adjust V-brakes as the pads wear. The pads position relative to the rim must be adjusted frequently as the rubber gets worn down and the pads need to be replaced regularly as the pads wear out. Your mileage may vary.

There is no way a pair of V-brakes could have functioned well over the last four working days here in DC without adjustment. (It rained every day). Four days vs. one year. Do the math.
I too ride a lot in all weather. All I'm seeing is your opinion...not saying its wrong...not saying I'm right...all I'm saying is one person's OPINION doesn't make a fact. Doesn't matter if its mine or yours.
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Old 09-14-11, 05:40 AM
  #50  
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I think you are confusing experience with opinion. It appears from your comments that you have had a bad experience with disc brakes and very little experience with V-brakes. In my opinion disc brakes are better. In my experience V-brakes require more frequent maintenance.

The fact remains that you will not ride all day for four days in the rain with V-brakes without maintenance or severe loss of braking performance.

Last edited by qmsdc15; 09-14-11 at 05:43 AM.
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