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Tyre choice

Old 03-11-14, 06:03 PM
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Tyre choice

have a trek ds 8.3..it has 700cx38 tyres on it..was thinking of fitting 700x35 or even 700x32 on it for a little less rolling resistence...bearing in mind I am still looking a certain level of comfort. Can anybody give me some advice??..or know much about puncture resistant tyres? I would cycle on average 2/3 times a week on average 25/30 miles at a time mostly on country roads or a toepath that has a good surface.... Sometimes cycling further.
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Old 03-11-14, 08:09 PM
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I've been looking at these for my next set of tires. I have never used them so cannot comment on their puncture protection.
Amazon.com: Continental Sport Contact Cross/Hybrid Bicycle Tire - Wire Bead: Sports & Outdoors
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Old 03-11-14, 09:18 PM
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try reading this thread and do an advanced search for puncture resistant tires
https://www.bikeforums.net/hybrid-bic...ant-tires.html
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Old 03-12-14, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by seanie700
have a trek ds 8.3..it has 700cx38 tyres on it..was thinking of fitting 700x35 or even 700x32 on it for a little less rolling resistence
There are several research articles that show thin tires actually have higher rolling resistance than wider tires (Tech FAQ: Seriously, wider tires have lower rolling resistance than their narrower brethren - VeloNews.com). Of course, there are other factors involved. Increasing tire pressure decreases rolling resistance (up to a point) to a significant degree. Then there is the speed factor. Thinner tires start to overtake wider tires in terms of better rolling resistance as the bike's speed increases due to aerodynamics. I went from comparable (in terms of tire materials and tread pattern) 35mm tires to 42 mm tires (Continental Top Contact II). At the poke along speed I normally travel (8 to 15 mph), aerodynamics of the tires is not an issue, and the 42s have noticeably less rolling resistance over the same path than the 35s. Also, the 42s are a more comfortable ride, absorbing more of the 'road buzz' than the 35s at equal tire pressures. As there is no free ride, the 42s are heavier than the 35s and are therefore not as quick when starting out. Fortunately though, I am not in a race and the upsides of the 42s far outshine the minor quickness penalty. The 42s are also much more sure-footed on loose trails, paths, and grass than the 35s.
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Old 03-13-14, 03:52 AM
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Originally Posted by JeffreyGlobe
There are several research articles that show thin tires actually have higher rolling resistance than wider tires (Tech FAQ: Seriously, wider tires have lower rolling resistance than their narrower brethren - VeloNews.com). Of course, there are other factors involved. Increasing tire pressure decreases rolling resistance (up to a point) to a significant degree. Then there is the speed factor. Thinner tires start to overtake wider tires in terms of better rolling resistance as the bike's speed increases due to aerodynamics. I went from comparable (in terms of tire materials and tread pattern) 35mm tires to 42 mm tires (Continental Top Contact II). At the poke along speed I normally travel (8 to 15 mph), aerodynamics of the tires is not an issue, and the 42s have noticeably less rolling resistance over the same path than the 35s. Also, the 42s are a more comfortable ride, absorbing more of the 'road buzz' than the 35s at equal tire pressures. As there is no free ride, the 42s are heavier than the 35s and are therefore not as quick when starting out. Fortunately though, I am not in a race and the upsides of the 42s far outshine the minor quickness penalty. The 42s are also much more sure-footed on loose trails, paths, and grass than the 35s.
Great reference, thanks for that.
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