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Official Trek DS owners thread

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Official Trek DS owners thread

Old 04-29-15, 07:45 PM
  #501  
GlennR
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Odd.. because the wheel magnet on mine worked right out of the box. I did have to put some rubber behind the cadence magnet to move it closer to the chain stay but only a few millimeters was all that it needed.

Yes, I had no problems with either magnet on my Emonda.
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Old 04-29-15, 08:04 PM
  #502  
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New trailer for my son means the DS pulls double duty as trail bike and school bus



@BaBang
Congrats on the new ride, Dual Sports are great bikes. To answer your questions...

1- Have you tried just using your phone? Many apps (Strava, MapMyRide, etc) will give you the basics with mileage, time, and elevation changes.

2- I carry a pump and spare tube personally, but your needs may be different than mine. The farther away from home/help you get, the more prepared you want to be, unless you have a very understanding spouse willing to play delivery driver.

3- Top is the bigger ring, but you want small ring in the back for more speed, so you use the bottom shift button. At least, that's how I keep it straight

4- steve_cay's link is a great resource to teach yourself to set up your own saddle. Give it a few dozen miles and you'll be amazed at how quickly you adapt; I hated the Evoke saddle on my Crossrip when I got it, told myself I wouldn't look at replacing it until I'd done over 100 miles in the seat, by then I'd gotten used to it and no worries

The most important thing is to just get out and enjoy yourself.
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Old 04-29-15, 08:04 PM
  #503  
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Originally Posted by BaBang View Post
Looks nice, but one review (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm5T-AKYAvQ) gave a very mix impression for the DS ... but really couldn't find anything specific with the DS model.
Works fine on my DS (2016 8.6) albeit I've had it for only a few days. The LBS did the install since I bought it with the bike, doesn't look like they did anything special. I imagine if you were to buy it at the same shop you got your DS they'd install it for you.

The main reason I suggested this is that it gives you a basic solution that can then grow to fit fancier solutions since the speed/cadence sensor will work with other stuff. It's a bit more compelling a story at $75 than at $100, but something to consider depending on your longer term goals.

Truth be told if you're ONLY interested in time/distance load the Strava app on your phone and use that.
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Old 04-29-15, 08:17 PM
  #504  
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Originally Posted by BaBang View Post
Looks nice, but one review (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm5T-AKYAvQ) gave a very mix impression for the DS and I'm not so sure I want to spend $100 when I don't care for all those bells and whistles. I was thinking something along the CateEye Velo 7... but really couldn't find anything specific with the DS model.
Bontrager is a brand owned by Trek. So they will make accessories "specifically" for the Trek models. I doubt the other brands will have something custom integrated. Myself I just use a $35 "Louis Garneau 20WL" wireless computer mounted with the included tie-wraps. The black display mounted to the black handlebars stem "looks" like it is supposed to be there, and a small postage stamp size black sensor is mounted almost at the hub on the front fork, and you will hardly see the two discreet black lines where the tie-wraps go around the fork. I get speed, distance, temp, min/max/avg speed, calories, time, trip time, maintenance reminder, etc. Cadence and heart monitor would be nice-to-have, but I did not feel like spending well over $100 more for those features.
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Old 04-29-15, 10:53 PM
  #505  
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The Duotrap S does look less neat than the Duotrap. I'm having the latter installed on a '14 Domane, but I'd sure skip it if I had to use the S model, and if it wound up looking like that 8.5 install in the video -even if it worked fine. I would use one of plenty non-Duotrap wireless solutions that have been available for years. It may be that some 2015 models are more S model-ready than others.
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Old 04-30-15, 05:50 AM
  #506  
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In context of the DS, the only choice for the integrated setup is the DuoTrap S version. Before 2015 there isn't a spot for the older DuoTrap, and for 2015+ the spot is for the DuoTrap S model.


IMHO the video is misleading. My DuoTrap S cadence and wheel magnets are installed without any modifications and work just fine. If it'd be useful, I can try to grab a couple pictures in the next couple of days. (FWIW I have a 2016 DS 8.6 but there's no apparent differences from the 2015 but for paint color)

As to value - if ONLY looking for a little trip computer then there are much cheaper options than what I suggested, such as the one steve_cay mentions.


I knew I wanted speed/cadence info to go to a small trip computer, plus my Garmin watch that I have today, and maybe to a phone app or a Garmin Edge in the future. In looking at the Garmin, CatEye, and Wahoo ANT+ / BT options I'd already be spending $60-70 just for the sensors. So at $75 on sale, the DuoTrapS/Trip300 combo kit was an easy choice for me. Even at $100 it's not bad if one expects to layer up in the future -- but not the best choice if you're not looking to use additional/alternate receivers later.

Last edited by gpburdell; 04-30-15 at 06:01 AM.
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Old 04-30-15, 05:41 PM
  #507  
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I just completed my first 100 miles on my 8.5. While it's nothing like my Emonda, it IS a excellent trail bike. The shifting is smooth and precise, the fit is relaxed and the freewheel is silent so there's no obnoxious "clicking" when in the woods. I'd say 2/3 my miles are trail/single track and the remaining 1/3 on pavement.

It's really relaxing to just roll over small potholes, roots and road debris on the DS vs avoiding all those on my road bike.

After completing 400 miles on the road bike this month, I was surprised to check my stats and see I did 100 miles on the DS.

Glad i'm not ignoring it.
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Old 04-30-15, 06:13 PM
  #508  
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Originally Posted by oldnslow2 View Post
I just completed my first 100 miles on my 8.5. While it's nothing like my Emonda, it IS a excellent trail bike.
Since you also have what is claimed by Trek to be "the lightest line of production bikes ever offered", would you hazard to guess what your average speed difference would be on the pavement between the two bikes?
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Old 04-30-15, 06:16 PM
  #509  
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Right now, trying to assemble a "repair" kit for my bike. Because I won't be more than a few miles from civilization, I really don't see a need to go overboard. Right now, my plan is to carry Mechanical Pump, Tire Lever, and an Extra Tube. From what I understand about tubeless tires, you can simple insert a tube, pump them up, and ride on them. After I get back, I can worry about replacing/patching the tire or simple using the tire until it wears out. But I had a few questions.

1) What tube should I get? From what I understand, I need a 700 tube that accepts a presta valve. Any particular recommendations?

2) Should I actually take my tubeless tire apart and "practice." Truthfully, I'm a bit scare I may screw something up.

3) Should I carry a gauge with me? With a pressure range of 60-80 PSI, I figure I would be able to see/feel an adequate amount of pressure until I got home. But if a gauge is recommended... please make suggestions of something small/accurate.

4) Should I worry about a bike multi-tool kit? I have the various tools at home... but nothing compact. With quick-release tires, I don't see the need unless I want to adjust the seat or something. This (http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Mini-9-...dp/B000FIE49A/) one looks fairly good... but I really don't know what I need.

Really, any feedback would be great. I've learned so much in the last couple of days.
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Old 04-30-15, 06:55 PM
  #510  
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Originally Posted by steve_cay View Post
Since you also have what is claimed by Trek to be "the lightest line of production bikes ever offered", would you hazard to guess what your average speed difference would be on the pavement between the two bikes?
On a "pavement and hard pack dirt" I averaged 15.5mph on a 15 mile ride. On the road bike I average 16.25mph on a 40 mile ride with 2000' of climbing, but on the flats i'd guess i'm more like 17.5mph.

So figure i'm 2mph slower on the DS.

The Emonda weighs just over 14# and rolls on 25mm while the DS I guess is 27# and rolls on 38mm. I'm also much more aero on the road bike.

The Emonda is is a Porsche GT3 and the DS is a Chevy Suburban.

There's room for both in my garage (the bikes, not the cars).
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Old 04-30-15, 07:07 PM
  #511  
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Originally Posted by oldnslow2 View Post
On a "pavement and hard pack dirt" I averaged 15.5mph on a 15 mile ride. On the road bike I average 16.25mph on a 40 mile ride with 2000' of climbing, but on the flats i'd guess i'm more like 17.5mph.

So figure i'm 2mph slower on the DS.

The Emonda weighs just over 14# and rolls on 25mm while the DS I guess is 27# and rolls on 38mm. I'm also much more aero on the road bike.

The Emonda is is a Porsche GT3 and the DS is a Chevy Suburban.

There's room for both in my garage (the bikes, not the cars).
Interesting, 12% lower average speed for double the weight, gnarlier tires, and less aerodynamics. I would have thought more, but also shows that we are not giving up the farm riding our DS's on the road, like some would like us to beleive. A GT3 vs a Suburban on a track ... now that would make for good comedy. Although I did see a video where a Cayenne Turbo was dead even with a base 911 on a track, but I digress
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Old 04-30-15, 07:14 PM
  #512  
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Originally Posted by steve_cay View Post
Interesting, 12% lower average speed for double the weight, gnarlier tires, and less aerodynamics. I would have thought more, but also shows that we are not giving up the farm riding our DS's on the road, like some would like us to beleive
While it's only 2mph slower, its over a shorter distance.. 10 miles vs 40 miles.

Originally Posted by steve_cay View Post
A GT3 vs a Suburban on a track ... now that would make for good comedy. Although I did see a video where a Cayenne Turbo was dead even with a base 911 on a track, but I digress
How about a 60's VW Split Bus?
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Old 04-30-15, 07:21 PM
  #513  
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Originally Posted by BaBang View Post
Right now, trying to assemble a "repair" kit for my bike. Because I won't be more than a few miles from civilization, I really don't see a need to go overboard. Right now, my plan is to carry Mechanical Pump, Tire Lever, and an Extra Tube. From what I understand about tubeless tires, you can simple insert a tube, pump them up, and ride on them. After I get back, I can worry about replacing/patching the tire or simple using the tire until it wears out. But I had a few questions.

1) What tube should I get? From what I understand, I need a 700 tube that accepts a presta valve. Any particular recommendations?

2) Should I actually take my tubeless tire apart and "practice." Truthfully, I'm a bit scare I may screw something up.

3) Should I carry a gauge with me? With a pressure range of 60-80 PSI, I figure I would be able to see/feel an adequate amount of pressure until I got home. But if a gauge is recommended... please make suggestions of something small/accurate.

4) Should I worry about a bike multi-tool kit? I have the various tools at home... but nothing compact. With quick-release tires, I don't see the need unless I want to adjust the seat or something. This (www.amazon.com/Topeak-Mini-9-Function-Bicycle-Tool/dp/B000FIE49A/) one looks fairly good... but I really don't know what I need.

Really, any feedback would be great. I've learned so much in the last couple of days.
Did you really convert to a tubeless setup, or just have a tubeless "ready" tire? If not you already have tubes in your tires despite some "tubeless ready" marketing.

1) Personally I carry a patch kit instead of tube, since I often ride with the familly and don't feel like carrying a whole collection.

2) Better to learn (and possibly screw up) at home, than on the side of the road!

3) I can feel when my pump hits around 80, becomes very hard to pump. You can see if you can "feel it" at home with your pump and gauge ... You don't need anything accurate to get home, as long as the tire feels firms when you press down on it with your weight on your hand.

4) I carry a multi tool for piece of mind. Although I never needed it while riding, if something gets loose while riding or I wipe out and need to repair something I have some tools. Mine also has the tire levers and wrenches built in. Also nice to be able to help somebody with mechanical problems while riding.

Last edited by steve_cay; 04-30-15 at 07:28 PM.
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Old 05-01-15, 06:07 AM
  #514  
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I mostly agree with steve_cay, though I'm carrying a tube just to be back rolling faster. Really a matter of preference balanced against where/when/how-far you're riding. Oh and there's a reason tire levers tend to come in pairs...


There's a wide array of multi-tools available with tons of options and costs. It's good to have the ability to tweak/adjust things while out and about, but I'd start with a $2 set of hex wrenches to get by with until you have a better idea of what you might need.
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Old 05-01-15, 09:34 AM
  #515  
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Originally Posted by steve_cay View Post
How do y'all lubricate the fork on our bikes? The Suntour manual sais to wipe stanchions with an oily cloth after every ride. The RST manual says to apply grease to stanchions every 10h of use. Neither specify what type of oil or grease. Reading up generically for bike shocks, there is a lot of "don't use grease containing lithium", "don't use typical grease that attracts dirt", "do not use anything with solvents", etc or your seals will be ruined prematurely. YouTube videos on the topic suggest "Fork Juice spray or oil", but that is not "grease" as specified in the RST manual.
Truthfully, with the caliber of forks on something like a DS (at least 8.4+), I do nothing. If the wipers are doing their job, and they darn well should be, any thing you put on the staunchion wont penetrate any way (and may or may not attract dirt). The only thing I do is wipe any obvious dirt off the the stanchions with a dry cloth (and even then thats getting picky as the wipers tend to...well...wipe it and leave it gathered in a ring at the upper end of the travel where its not harming anything other than the looks). Disclaimer: I dont ride in mud/rain/etc. Our bikes' worst enemy is crusher dust (which is hell on chains, not so much forks).

EVENTUALLY the lub/grease embedded in the wipers will need freshening up, if not the wipers themselves, and perhaps after some years (depending on your riding) the insides could stand to be cleaned and re-greased, but thats a tear down rebuild sort of thing.

If you feel you must (this from the local Trek dealer), a drop, and I do mean a drop, of Teflon lube under the outer seal will keep things sliding and sealed well enough.

Last edited by Sunsanvil; 05-01-15 at 09:40 AM.
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Old 05-01-15, 09:39 AM
  #516  
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As I remember, any maintenance intervals for the forks on motorcycles I've owned were in the tens of thousands of miles if there was any interval specified.

I suspect DS forks will be just fine to be left alone (keep them clean of debris) for years of use unless/until there's a problem. Maybe a DS that is left outdoors 24x7 might need some attention but one that is indoors much of the time is likely fine as is.
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Old 05-01-15, 09:54 AM
  #517  
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Originally Posted by Sunsanvil View Post
If you feel you must (this from the local Trek dealer), a drop, and I do mean a drop, of Teflon lube under the outer seal will keep things sliding and sealed well enough.
Thanks for the advise guys, that is exactly what I have been doing (with dry chain teflon lube) ... so I guess I will continue ...
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Old 05-01-15, 10:23 AM
  #518  
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Originally Posted by steve_cay View Post
Thanks for the advise guys, that is exactly what I have been doing (with dry chain teflon lube) ... so I guess I will continue ...
umm..I probably wouldn't use a dry lube in this context, but thats just me. I'd worry about it hardening (which its designed to do) and then interfering with the wippers' mating to the stanchions.

If you want to use something and want to be sure, just pony up the $6 for something which is fork specific like SRAM's juice or FinishLine's Stanchion oil...but again even that may not actually be necessary.

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Old 05-01-15, 01:36 PM
  #519  
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Originally Posted by Sunsanvil View Post
umm..I probably wouldn't use a dry lube in this context, but thats just me. I'd worry about it hardening (which its designed to do) and then interfering with the wippers' mating to the stanchions.

If you want to use something and want to be sure, just pony up the $6 for something which is fork specific like SRAM's juice or FinishLine's Stanchion oil...but again even that may not actually be necessary.
Ok, got it, will look for a Teflon wet lube.
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Old 05-01-15, 01:43 PM
  #520  
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Decided to splurge a bit and get the trip 300 with duotrap S.

In order to work the cadence monitor... I need to remove the pedal. It looks like I simply need to use an 8mm Allen wrench in the appropriate direction (which is different, depending on the pedal). Do I need to use any special tools (torque wrench) and should I re-lube the threads when I put the pedal back on (If so, recommend a lube that I can find anywhere).

Thanks =)

Last edited by BaBang; 05-01-15 at 01:52 PM.
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Old 05-01-15, 02:13 PM
  #521  
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Originally Posted by BaBang View Post
Decided to splurge a bit and get the trip 300 with duotrap S.

In order to work the cadence monitor... I need to remove the pedal. It looks like I simply need to use an 8mm Allen wrench in the appropriate direction (which is different, depending on the pedal). Do I need to use any special tools (torque wrench) and should I re-lube the threads when I put the pedal back on (If so, recommend a lube that I can find anywhere).

Thanks =)
Remove with the Allen wrench (mine came off easily enough). If too tight, you can also use a proper pedal wrench, or regular wrench in a pinch on the nut on the other side. You should always lube pedal threads, but if they are already all greasy you can just put em back. I used coper anti-seize grease (because I had some) on my new pedals, but any grease should work. Tighten reasonably with a small tool ... but do not tighten as hard as you can with a long wrench.

Note: The left pedal is a reverse thread, turn it the other way than a standard thread.

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Old 05-02-15, 01:20 PM
  #522  
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Just got the 8.5 great bike.
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Old 05-02-15, 04:56 PM
  #523  
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Thanks for all the help guys =) I got my Trip300/DuoTrap combo on the bike and have learned a great deal in the process.

Installing the Trip300 wasn't exactly easy. First I had to remove the back wheel... which is a bit obnoxious to get back on without a repair-stand (I probably should purchase one in the future). The left peddle was impossible to remove with the allen wrench (6mm...not 8mm), but I purchased a bike wrench and that gave me enough leverage to remove the peddle. I also added some anti-seize. The cadence magnet, which is placed on the crank, doesn't seem to be made for the DS; they include 3-sizes... and in order to make the middle-size work, you need to insert a piece of hard rubber under the magent loop to move it closer to the sensor. It would have been nice if they had a size specifically for the DS instead of resulting to some MacGyver fix.

But everything worked and it didn't take my longer than an hour. Knowing what I know now... I probably could do it in 10 minutes. But I'm happy that I purchased the Trip300/DuoTrap combo. The system communicates quite well and seems to be fairly responsive to changes in speed/cadence. Hopefully the battery (especially in the sensor) won't need replacement very often.

Again, thanks =)
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Old 05-03-15, 05:41 AM
  #524  
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Originally Posted by shakyfromwakey View Post
Just got the 8.5 great bike.
It is a beautiful looking bike, you should give us more pics of it.
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Old 05-03-15, 06:43 AM
  #525  
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Originally Posted by shakyfromwakey View Post
Just got the 8.5 great bike.
Congrats!

Are those some old-school toe clips and straps? Or just an optical illusion?
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