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Official Trek DS owners thread

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Official Trek DS owners thread

Old 07-06-19, 07:54 AM
  #1826  
DorkDisk
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
Thanks for the reply. I don't plan to wear clips, ever, and I don't want too big of pedals lol. I was looking at something like this: https://www.amazon.ca/RockBros-Light...gateway&sr=8-7

or (https://www.amazon.ca/Mongoose-Mount...gateway&sr=8-5)

Both are 9/16"x 1/2"

The ones that came stock on my bike are narrower, something along the lines of:
https://www.amazon.ca/Bell-Kicks-Uni...gateway&sr=8-6

I don't really care that they're plastic vs metal, I'd assume the nylon is probably stronger and won't bend anyway. Just honestly looking for a cheap fix to widen my pedal, I like those Mongoose ones because they have reflectors on them still.

Do expensive pedals really make a difference?
"Rock Bros" appears to be a pretty shady company when it comes to intellectual property; many people have noticed the similarity to the popular RaceFace Chester. I'd avoid their products personally.

VP and Wellgo make most of these pedals for companies like RaceFace; you can look at their products for lower markup. MSW is QBP's brand and they offer some pedals at good prices at your LBS.

These are made by VP and offer a low height, which I like. I might object to Grant Peterson's style, but he consistently has proven himself when it comes to component picks.
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Old 07-07-19, 01:28 PM
  #1827  
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handlebar question on Dual Sport 3

I purchased a new Trek Dual Sport 3 on Friday and I love it so far. I have bad shoulders (rotator cuffs) and need a more upright ride, and the first day I rode it the bike felt perfect - no strain on my shoulders compared to my last bike. However, I realized the seat was too low, so I adjusted it up about an inch and a half, which makes the pedaling perfect, but now I feel like I am leaning too far down to the handlebars, putting too much pressure on my shoulders on longer rides. I've read a lot about changing stems or changing to a "riser" handlebar, but wanted to hear which option people think is simplest and most effective (and/or cost-effective) option to do first. What's the best way to move the handlebars about 1.5 - 1.75 inches (38mm - 45mm) taller?
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Old 07-07-19, 02:22 PM
  #1828  
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@Moose95, the easiest way to do that is either a stem extension or an adjustable stem. These are widely available online, and your local bike shop will also be happy to help get it setup correctly for you. Another option is a shorter length stem with a higher rise. Something like a 35 degree stem that's only 70mm long for example. This will move the bars higher AND closer to you, which will also make your riding position more upright. This is probably the easiest and lowest cost option. A side benefit is the stem will be rock solid stable (some of the adjustable ones can feel like they have play in them). Those links are to Amazon pages which will give you a visual idea of what these products are. You can of course buy online and install yourself or buy at your local bike shop and they'll probably swap it out for you at no (or very little) additional cost.

Different handlebars are also an option, and can be very effective. They're usually more costly and involve more labor to change (you have to move all your controls over). The grips are often the most annoying part, especially if your factory grips are slip-on (vs. lock-on).
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Old 07-07-19, 03:24 PM
  #1829  
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I bought a 2019 DS3 about a year ago. I was pretty much in the same circumstances as you... get the seat the right height but then leaning more downward than I wanted and a bit more stretched out than I wanted. Thing was I didn't know just exactly what stem I wanted (angle and length) to replace it with. OTH, I didn't want an adjustable stem because in the past (long past!) those adjustable stems weren't solid feeling and they tended to have an annoying creaky sound when riding. Long story short, I ended up buying one of these in 90 mm length https://www.amazon.com/Ritchey-16053...s%2C166&sr=8-1

At the time my thoughts were I could adjust this stem and figure out what I wanted and then get a solid one piece stem to match that. Well, here it is about a year later and I've still got the adjustable on the bike. This particular model is difficult to adjust the angle compared to a one screw type but the reward is ending up with a stem that is very close to being like a one piece in terms of being rigid. All 4 of those screws, on the Ritchey, secure the stem on the bike but the thing is in order to change the angle you have to loosen them so much that you end up, often as not, needing to realign the handlebars. It's like a 5 minute job as compared to a one screw adjustable stem that takes about 30 seconds. IMO, the reward is worth the effort.
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Old 07-07-19, 04:23 PM
  #1830  
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Thanks hokiefyd and LesG! And thanks also for including links so I could see what you were talking about. I have that same concern that I would be swapping parts all the time while chasing down the perfect fit, because my problem only really shows up after about 10 miles of biking, so I think I will go with LesG's solution and try the Ritchie adjustable one until I get the right fit, and if it holds up like you say, I may not need to swap out for a one-piece. I've got several more ideas for upgrades, so I've been reading through the 74 (!) pages of this thread to get answers for those, but I might be back for more questions - like the best fenders... so many ways to spend more money... Thanks!
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Old 07-07-19, 04:47 PM
  #1831  
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When/if you get the Ritchey please report back after you've put some miles on it. I'd be curious about how others like it (or not). Ends up it suits me just fine but then I ride mostly for exercise 3 or 4 days a week around 20 miles each time. A lot of hills to contend with where I live so that stem does get pulled on from time to time and, like I said doesn't make any creaky noises and is solid. The rest of my bike rides are pleasure with my wife, mostly rail/trails and mups so I don't consider myself hard core.
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Old 07-07-19, 07:48 PM
  #1832  
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Originally Posted by Moose95 View Post
I purchased a new Trek Dual Sport 3 on Friday and I love it so far. I have bad shoulders (rotator cuffs) and need a more upright ride, and the first day I rode it the bike felt perfect - no strain on my shoulders compared to my last bike. However, I realized the seat was too low, so I adjusted it up about an inch and a half, which makes the pedaling perfect, but now I feel like I am leaning too far down to the handlebars, putting too much pressure on my shoulders on longer rides. I've read a lot about changing stems or changing to a "riser" handlebar, but wanted to hear which option people think is simplest and most effective (and/or cost-effective) option to do first. What's the best way to move the handlebars about 1.5 - 1.75 inches (38mm - 45mm) taller?
I had my Trek dealer install a Delta stem extender. I had the same problem with a too forward position. I was getting numb hands and sore perineum area. This extention gave me a more upright position and adjusts a couple inches. It is very solid.

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Old 07-08-19, 10:27 AM
  #1833  
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
Can anyone make a recommendation for new, larger pedals? The ones that came on my DS2 are too small for my big ass feet. Thanks
I recently installed the elite MTB set from Bontrager. I like them, they seem solid. However, they are a little tall, and Iíve already had a couple instances of them scraping the ground while in a turn. Iíd post a link, but canít until 10 posts... 😕
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Old 07-08-19, 04:37 PM
  #1834  
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Hey Jac of Hearts, thanks for the reply. That's a great looking bike - you have the same phone holder as I do, too! I ordered the Ritchie stem so I can try multiple positions and figure out that works for me. I'll report back after I get it installed and test it out. Thanks again for the advice!
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Old 07-08-19, 07:54 PM
  #1835  
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Originally Posted by Moose95 View Post
Hey Jac of Hearts, thanks for the reply. That's a great looking bike - you have the same phone holder as I do, too! I ordered the Ritchie stem so I can try multiple positions and figure out that works for me. I'll report back after I get it installed and test it out. Thanks again for the advice!
Thanks Moose95. I'm really digging the matte grey color.
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Old 07-16-19, 09:17 PM
  #1836  
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Update on Ritchie stem

Originally Posted by LesG View Post
When/if you get the Ritchey please report back after you've put some miles on it. I'd be curious about how others like it (or not). Ends up it suits me just fine but then I ride mostly for exercise 3 or 4 days a week around 20 miles each time. A lot of hills to contend with where I live so that stem does get pulled on from time to time and, like I said doesn't make any creaky noises and is solid. The rest of my bike rides are pleasure with my wife, mostly rail/trails and mups so I don't consider myself hard core.
So here's my update on the Ritchie adjustable stem: I ordered the 105mm stem (the stock stem is 90mm) because I intended to raise the handlebars a lot, and I didn't want to shorten the reach between the seat and handlebars too much with the bend. I set the angle pretty steep - at least 45 degrees (the description says it can adjust +/- 55 degrees). This made the handlebar a little closer to the seat than the stock setup, but at least an inch and a half taller, and it works great. I have put about 30 miles on the new setup, with about 10 miles of that on bumpy gravel or packed dirt with exposed roots, and this thing is rock solid. I am only now getting back into bike riding after about a 35 year hiatus, so I am far from hard core, but I am pretty heavy-set and can stress out a bike, so I figure the rough roads and bumps were a pretty good test of the stem.

I think one critical key to success is that I also bought the "Venzo Bike Torque Wrench Allen Key tool socket set" (still too much of a newbie to be allowed to post links, but search for it on Amazon - it's about $50.) It is a really nice torque wrench set, and easy to set the torque setting, and the "click" is impossible to miss. All of the bolts had a torque setting printed next to them, so I followed it exactly when putting it back together and it does not squeak or move at all. I probably would have over-tightened everything if not for the torque wrench, and I figure I can use this for other accessories, so it was worth getting. As a bonus, a socket wrench is WAY faster than an allen key when loosening or tightening bolts.

So back to the stem - thanks again for the advice LesG and everyone! My shoulders feel SO much better riding more upright. I had to see it to understand what you were saying about how you basically have to take it almost apart to adjust the angle, but I think that makes the design much more sturdy, and it still only takes a few minutes to adjust it if needed. You just have to take your time and be careful tightening everything evenly. With the size of the teeth on the angle adjustment, it makes for a very solid joint with a lot of contact area between the two halves. Like you, I am pretty happy with how it turned out, and don't plan to buy a one piece - so far it's been great.

The only issue I have had is chasing perfect handlebar alignment now - at first the handlebars were skewed slightly to the right when I put it back together, then I adjusted it again and now it is just very slightly to the left - barely enough to tell, but if I pay attention I notice. I'm not OCD enough to keep tweaking it one half millimeter at a time to find dead straight... I think :-) If anyone has an easy way to align the handlebars, I'm open to suggestions. In the meantime, however, this setup has made the bike even better to ride. Thanks again for the help! This forum is awesome.
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Old 07-17-19, 07:58 AM
  #1837  
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Thanks for reporting back on that stem and glad it's working out for you. I've always been a bit curious about what others think about that stem. I went with the 90 mm stem and I too have it at a pretty steep angle. Since the installation of the stem my saddle is now about even or very slightly higher than the handlebars. And like you I used a torque wrench (different brand) to tighten the screws because I usually have a tendency to over tighten stuff. Not to beat a dead horse, but the stem is a rock solid design and miles better than the one screw adjustable I had experience with many years ago.

Yep, it is a bit of a pain to adjust the angle compared to the one screw adjustables but, as already said, the reward of a stiff stem and no creaky sounds makes it worth it. I don't have any secret recipe for handlebar alignment but what I did was simply "eyeball" it using the seat post, head tube and front tire as the sight guides for the position of the handlebar. It helps (helps me anyway) with that alignment that our bikes are stored in the garage using one of these https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Floo...gateway&sr=8-5. With that stand, instead of it (bike) leaning one way or the other, it is more upright and I can stand back a bit for a better sight picture of those 3 things. There's probably a better method out there than that but it works for me.
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Old 07-22-19, 01:27 AM
  #1838  
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Hi there,

This is my first post here - and looking for some advice from you DS owners

I currently cycle to and from work in Central London once a week (18 miles each way). I am extremely fortunate as 90% of the route is along a towpath. The surface ranges from paved to trail, with some sections being pretty rough. I currently ride my Trek Seattle that I brought back from the Netherlands when I moved back to London. This bike is more of a city bike but it is comfortable, if a bit heavy. My ride takes my about 1h20m.

I am looking to get a new bike and really like the look of the DS3. I am happy to stick with Trek and feel that this bike will meet my needs and be a good upgrade on my current bike. I know a lot of people seem to criticise the suspension on the DS3, but I feel it will be useful to have the option to unlock it on the rougher surfaces and then lock it on the smooth. I would like to get a bit quicker - but firstly I would like to commute more frequently and let the speed get better as I get stronger.

So I am curious of people's thoughts and advice. One particular question I had was with regard to the gears - my current bike has 3 gears and I have not owned a bike with more gears than that. So I don't even know how to change gears on bikes with more! Or what gears I should be looking at. My route is very flat, so it would be less about needing gears for climbs, but just so that I could be more efficient on the flat.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts or advice!
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Old 07-25-19, 08:28 AM
  #1839  
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You will not regret getting the Trek DS3. It is versatile and it has several gears to compensate the dynamic terrain you are into.

It has 2 Chain Rings (front) and the cassette(rear) has 10 rear cogs. Meaning you have 20 speed.
The 10 rear cogs which has a range of 11 teeth to 40 teeth. So you have plenty of range for Lower Speed(for Climbing), Mid Speed, and High Speed.(You just need to learn how to use the right gear.)

It has front shock lock-out switch that you can choose. The only weakness of this bicycle is the shocks in front which I think can be upgraded into RockShox brand if you want.
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Old 07-25-19, 10:40 AM
  #1840  
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Originally Posted by zurcenegue View Post
You will not regret getting the Trek DS3. It is versatile and it has several gears to compensate the dynamic terrain you are into.

It has 2 Chain Rings (front) and the cassette(rear) has 10 rear cogs. Meaning you have 20 speed.
The 10 rear cogs which has a range of 11 teeth to 40 teeth. So you have plenty of range for Lower Speed(for Climbing), Mid Speed, and High Speed.(You just need to learn how to use the right gear.)

It has front shock lock-out switch that you can choose. The only weakness of this bicycle is the shocks in front which I think can be upgraded into RockShox brand if you want.
Maybe you're thinking of another bike but my 2019 DS3 (bought about a year ago) has a crank with 3 chain rings (48/36/26) and a 11/34 9 speed cassette. I could do without that 26 chain ring because I never use it and I've got lots of hills around here to content with. I agree that if a person wants they could upgrade the front shock but for the type of riding I do, it's used mostly just to smooth out rough sections of roads (or MUPs, rail/trails and occasional gravel). Around home it's used mainly for exercise on 20 to 25 mile rides and even then I sometimes reach down and turn on the shock when I hit a rough patch. Anyway, I won't be changing it out and it's good enough for me and the type of riding I do.

Swooshboy, I find the DS3 comfortable and you're right, a lot of controversy about that front suspension fork. On the down side it does add weight, only has I believe 63 mm of travel and isn't a top of the line suspension fork so really rough off pavement (as in rough downhill mountain type paths or the like) wouldn't suit the bike. That said, I like the fork for the reasons I stated above and for the riding I do with the occasional light off pavement. I don't obsess over weight so I don't worry about ounces/grams. The only additions to the bike I added are bar end grips to give my arms/hands extra choices for hand position. The Trek saddle on the DS3 didn't work for me at all so I changed that out to a Brooks B17. After about 1600 miles or so I did change out the tires to Schwalbe 38 mm Almotion tires and ended up not going tubeless with them... I did remove the ugly (IMO) reflective strip the Almotions have and I might add the Almotions give a nicer, smoother, quieter ride compared to the stock tires but are not designed for, say, riding around in the mud or loose gravel but do fine in packed gravel. As for gears, my most used chain ring is the middle in combination with 5th, 6th or 7th of the rear cassette, that would be on fairly flat ground. Steep uphill I'm usually using the middle chainring on the front along with 3rd or 4th on the rear. I hope that helps a bit answering your question about having more gears available than you're used to. Also, I don't consider myself a hard core cyclist, just somebody that does it for exercise and fun rides with my wife on MUPs and rail trails.
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Old 07-25-19, 12:28 PM
  #1841  
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I'm also going to recommend the DS3. I bought mine at early June of this year. My riding is about 50/50 road/rail to trail. I changed the stem to a 30 deg 60mm to help with an arthritic elbow. The suspension fork does help reduce shock to arms and wrists when things get a little bumpy on the trails. I also don't worry about a little extra weight. I'm not trying to break speed records. This bike is perfect for my purposes, exercise and enjoyment.
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Old 07-26-19, 07:28 AM
  #1842  
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Appreciate the comments - am hoping to pick it up next week s will share my thoughts when I do!
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Old 07-26-19, 03:30 PM
  #1843  
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I need to add/correct something I said earlier. I mentioned above the only changes I made to my DS3 were bar ends and tires. drb372 post where he/she replaced the stem reminded me that I did also change the stem. I ended up with this one in 90MM length: https://www.amazon.com/Ritchey-16053...s%2C166&sr=8-1 Not at all like the one screw adjustment found on most adjustable stems... I wrote a bit more about it within this Hybrid forum (specifically this dual sport forum) earlier this month if you or anyone is interested in it.
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Old 07-26-19, 06:17 PM
  #1844  
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Just for the record, definitely a he
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Old 07-26-19, 07:48 PM
  #1845  
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Originally Posted by zurcenegue View Post
You will not regret getting the Trek DS3. It is versatile and it has several gears to compensate the dynamic terrain you are into.

It has 2 Chain Rings (front) and the cassette(rear) has 10 rear cogs. Meaning you have 20 speed.
The 10 rear cogs which has a range of 11 teeth to 40 teeth. So you have plenty of range for Lower Speed(for Climbing), Mid Speed, and High Speed.(You just need to learn how to use the right gear.)

It has front shock lock-out switch that you can choose. The only weakness of this bicycle is the shocks in front which I think can be upgraded into RockShox brand if you want.
The DS 4 has 2 rings up front and a remote lockout. The DS3 has 3 rings up front and a manual lockout. I looked at both bikes before finding my DS 8.5 used at a great deal.

My 8.5 has a remote lockout and I really like it. I rarely use my lowest chain ring but when I really need it I'm glad it's there.
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Old 08-02-19, 09:01 PM
  #1846  
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Originally Posted by Jac of Hearts View Post
The DS 4 has 2 rings up front and a remote lockout. The DS3 has 3 rings up front and a manual lockout. I looked at both bikes before finding my DS 8.5 used at a great deal.

My 8.5 has a remote lockout and I really like it. I rarely use my lowest chain ring but when I really need it I'm glad it's there.
VERY good move, Jac, and my 2013 8.5 also has 3 chain rings, just like my mountain bikes. Only downside to mine was that some were recalled for faulty forks; the upside was that I got a new fork -still with the remote lockout, whenever that was. Congrats, and enjoy your new bike.
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Old 08-02-19, 09:13 PM
  #1847  
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Originally Posted by BiciMan View Post
VERY good move, Jac, and my 2013 8.5 also has 3 chain rings, just like my mountain bikes. Only downside to mine was that some were recalled for faulty forks; the upside was that I got a new fork -still with the remote lockout, whenever that was. Congrats, and enjoy your new bike.
When I found out about the fork recall I took my bike to my Trek dealer to be checked. Sure enough it was part of the recall. They replaced the fork while I waited.
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Old 08-03-19, 04:08 PM
  #1848  
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Originally Posted by Jac of Hearts View Post
When I found out about the fork recall I took my bike to my Trek dealer to be checked. Sure enough it was part of the recall. They replaced the fork while I waited.
Interesting that it hadn't been done earlier. Excellent, nice, and good for Trek: I just searched my computer and that recall was issued >4 years ago.
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Old 08-14-19, 07:54 PM
  #1849  
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Hi there,

I'm new here, ordered and waiting for DS4 2020. I'm 6'2 so I got XL size.

Planning to change stim, handlebar to get more upright sitting position, and maybe will change tires from 40c to 45c, not sure yet...

Really like this forum!

Last edited by LeoGrand; 08-14-19 at 07:58 PM.
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Old 08-14-19, 08:33 PM
  #1850  
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Join Date: May 2019
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 108

Bikes: 2012 Trek Dual Sport 8.5 Gary Fisher Collection

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Originally Posted by LeoGrand View Post
Hi there,

I'm new here, ordered and waiting for DS4 2020. I'm 6'2 so I got XL size.

Planning to change stim, handlebar to get more upright sitting position, and maybe will change tires from 40c to 45c, not sure yet...

Really like this forum!
I do 95% of my riding on the road and I really like the 700c x 38s I have. They are H5s. Probably a slimmer version of whats on your Verve.
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