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Why did you choose a hybrid over the other bike styles?

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Why did you choose a hybrid over the other bike styles?

Old 05-10-14, 03:02 PM
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ps249
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Why did you choose a hybrid over the other bike styles?

I was riding mountain bikes since 1993. I started out on the bike hills and dirt trails. Then I discovered the rail trails around my area. Each passing year more trails were popping up. It wasn't until 2009 I was looking to get a new bike and told the salesperson my main riding was 95% paved rail trails. He showed me the hybrid selection and eventually decided on a Giant FCR3. I was leery of the thin tires but decided I wanted more of a road bike than a knobby mountain bike. Five years later- I am enjoying the hybrids more and more. Glad I made the switch.

Mtn bikes were fun for me at first. But buying the more expensive mtn bikes made me realize I wanted to keep an expensive bike neat and clean. The proliferation of the rail trails also made up my mind.
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Old 05-10-14, 04:06 PM
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I like them because they're the best of both worlds. You can keep up with some of the fastest roadies and you can do some moderate XC or singletracking, just like you would on either a mtb, or a CX bike.

I still love my road bike though! With interrupter brakes, the riding position is very similar to a hybrid.

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Old 05-10-14, 04:25 PM
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Because I was new to cycling and didn't know any better. I have only been riding for 2 months, and after 30 days I knew I should have bought a road bike.
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Old 05-10-14, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by vzwire View Post
Because I was new to cycling and didn't know any better. I have only been riding for 2 months, and after 30 days I knew I should have bought a road bike.
Ya know, I'd almost echo those sentiments, except I still can't get over how comfortable my Quick is. While I may not be able to keep up at top speed or steepest climbs with the carbon-fiber $10K road bike folks, I also don't have to stretching routines when I'm done because my neck, back, shoulders, etc all hurt.

It's hard to beat the comfort of a hybrid.

I may still get a road bike some day but I know I can hop on my hybrid and go pretty much anywhere!
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Old 05-10-14, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by vzwire View Post
Because I was new to cycling and didn't know any better. I have only been riding for 2 months, and after 30 days I knew I should have bought a road bike.
Sell it and buy a road bike then....

Didn't know any better about what? Some Hybrids blow a road bike out of the water...

Last edited by raqball; 05-10-14 at 05:37 PM.
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Old 05-10-14, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by vzwire View Post
Because I was new to cycling and didn't know any better. I have only been riding for 2 months, and after 30 days I knew I should have bought a road bike.

This is a common experience for new cyclists, who are really roadies deep down inside. Of course, the new cyclist doesn't know he is as drawn to cycling as he actually becomes. He therefore buys a less expensive bike, like a hybrid. Later, he finds himself investing in a really nice speed oriented road bike.

Most likely, the hybrid will become your fair weather bike, and your new road bike will become your club bike and/or your recreation bike. It's typically the roadies first N+1 experience!

Last edited by WestPablo; 05-10-14 at 07:29 PM.
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Old 05-10-14, 04:55 PM
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I already had a road bike and I wanted something upright for traffic safety. I felt a rigid frame and riserbar was what I needed.
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Old 05-10-14, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by giantcfr1 View Post
I already had a road bike and I wanted something upright for traffic safety. I felt a rigid frame and riserbar was what I needed.

What about a road bike with interrupter bars?...Approximates a hybrid-like, upright position, as well...
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Old 05-10-14, 05:56 PM
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I used to ride mountain bikes, but it's been about 10 years since I rode, and getting back into it I was attracted to the familiar flat bars and wider tires of a hybrid. I may get a road bike eventually, but at the moment I'm happy.
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Old 05-10-14, 06:11 PM
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The comfort of the riding position. I tried numerous road bikes and they were just agonizing to ride - neck and back aches due to the riding position and no amount of adjusting really helped. And the riding position between my FX and some of the road bikes I tried isn't all that different, but it was enough. Similarly I find it easier to monitor traffic when my head's not down. Plus, a number of the trails I ride aren't paved, but are dressed limestone and gravel, so a road bike would've not been at it's best anyway.

As for all the bumf about efficiency and whatnot, I don't race, I don't do group rides, and I have no problems with riding long distance, climbing the steep hills around here, or maintaining a quick pace on the flats, so the minor amount of speed I lose by not having my ass in the air is not missed. Lightness and good gearing is a far more important factor than the riding position.
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Old 05-10-14, 07:14 PM
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I have had a road bike since I was a teenager, and just got a "Dual Sport" hybrid (Trek DS).

I find:
- I like getting out in the woods, the hybrid is much more appropriate for such use!
- The more upright position and wider hand stance is more comfortable for me. For longer journeys the more efficient position of a road bike would probably win out.
- Upright position has you naturaly looking more straight ahead, rather than at the road below you.
- Much smoother (with my wider tires, and front suspension), on the road and off.
- You can actually use the brakes in the upright position!

The way I bike, I really don't notice a big difference in speed and efficiency between my road and hybrid bike.

For liesure, exercise, dirt trails, and trying to not leave my family in the dust, I prefer my hybrid ... a more pleasurable experience!

If I were trying to keep up with a strong group, doing timed runs, going on full day road trips, or taking myself much more seriously in biking culture ... I would reach for the road bike. I don't do those things, and don't think I will be using my road bike much anymore

I was often told I could never enjoy a hybrid (especially a more trail oriented one) coming from a road bike, not the case! Different strokes for different folks!

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Old 05-10-14, 07:55 PM
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Versatility was the main appeal for me. I didn't want a one-trick pony. I love to be able to transition from road to gravel paths to woodland trails several times within a single ride. I think a road bike, for me, would be a fun / occasional use fair weather ride. Not worth the cost (again, for me).
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Old 05-10-14, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by WestPablo View Post
This is a common experience for new cyclists, who are really roadies deep down inside. Of course, the new cyclist doesn't know he is as drawn to cycling as he actually becomes. He therefore buys a less expensive bike, like a hybrid. Later, he finds himself investing in a really nice speed oriented road bike.

Most likely, the hybrid will become your fair weather bike, and your new road bike will become your club bike and/or your recreation bike. It's typically the roadies first N+1 experience!
You described me very well. I began cycling last summer. Since I was just going to do some recreational/fitness biking, I bought a hybrid (though I wouldn't call it inexpensive - it was $1,000). Just last week, I bought my second bike, a "really nice" road bike. I haven't ridden the hybrid since then, including commuting.

I do plan on using the hybrid for commuting and running errands once this initial frenzy has died down. I just don't know how long it's going to take.
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Old 05-10-14, 09:13 PM
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I have 3 bikes, all of which I built up from the frames and forks. My hybrid is my street and woodland trails machine. My roadie is for my desire to truly fly. And I have an excellent 1970's three-speed for my around town supplies runs. I love them all equally.

Have fun!
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Old 05-10-14, 10:55 PM
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Originally Posted by WestPablo View Post
What about a road bike with interrupter bars?...Approximates a hybrid-like, upright position, as well...
If you are talking about aux levers I did but I persaonally think they look terrible on a road bike and also I wanted wider bars. Some of us like a choice of bikes for different uses.
My road bike also has a saddle to bar drop of about 3 inches. Hardly an upright position.


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Old 05-10-14, 11:03 PM
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Originally Posted by WDH74 View Post
The comfort of the riding position. I tried numerous road bikes and they were just agonizing to ride - neck and back aches due to the riding position and no amount of adjusting really helped. And the riding position between my FX and some of the road bikes I tried isn't all that different, but it was enough. Similarly I find it easier to monitor traffic when my head's not down. Plus, a number of the trails I ride aren't paved, but are dressed limestone and gravel, so a road bike would've not been at it's best anyway. Roger That !!!!!

As for all the bumf about efficiency and whatnot, I don't race, I don't do group rides, and I have no problems with riding long distance, climbing the steep hills around here, or maintaining a quick pace on the flats, so the minor amount of speed I lose by not having my ass in the air is not missed. Lightness and good gearing is a far more important factor than the riding position.
Roger That!!
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Old 05-10-14, 11:06 PM
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Originally Posted by WDH74 View Post
The comfort of the riding position. I tried numerous road bikes and they were just agonizing to ride - neck and back aches due to the riding position and no amount of adjusting really helped. And the riding position between my FX and some of the road bikes I tried isn't all that different, but it was enough. Similarly I find it easier to monitor traffic when my head's not down. Plus, a number of the trails I ride aren't paved, but are dressed limestone and gravel, so a road bike would've not been at it's best anyway.

As for all the bumf about efficiency and whatnot, I don't race, I don't do group rides, and I have no problems with riding long distance, climbing the steep hills around here, or maintaining a quick pace on the flats, so the minor amount of speed I lose by not having my ass in the air is not missed. Lightness and good gearing is a far more important factor than the riding position.
100% agree!

I can't ride a road bike as it kills my back! I can do flat bars but not drop bars..

I get that some want to zoom, zoom, zoom and I guess for them a road bike makes sense..
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Old 05-10-14, 11:20 PM
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A Trek Domane is almost like riding a lazyboy chair. Don't see how all roadbikes are painful. In my exp, both roadbikes and hybrids are equally tiresome over several hours made easier only by how well the bike has been fitted to YOU.
I like how hybrids feels in the city but dislike climbing hills in them. The bar ends do not feel as good as with hoods on a roadbike on hills. Its best to just get one of each if you are really into bikes, just the serious bargains and hard core bikes are all road bikes. High end Hybrid bikes have no selection its either the FX 7.7 or Sirrus LTDs, or Cannondale Carbon Quicks, I can say most of those are overpriced compared to the great value in CAAD bikes or even aluminum TCR bikes which are crazy light 18.50 pounds for 1350.00. You can buy a light high performance TCR roadbike for 1350 but in Hybird for 1350 its heavy, low components, cheaper build. The makers do not do hybrid fans any justice compared to the scale they pay to roadbike riders.

FWIW just put in your due time with Road bikes, they get much more comfortable once you get stronger with the muscles needed for biking. Its not normal to get low in the roadbike position. I was aching and moaning and its all gone now.

Last edited by 2702; 05-10-14 at 11:27 PM.
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Old 05-10-14, 11:30 PM
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Originally Posted by 2702 View Post
FWIW just put in your due time with Road bikes, they get much more comfortable once you get stronger with the muscles needed for biking. Its not normal to get low in the roadbike position. I was aching and moaning and its all gone now.
I'm going to have bike fitting done tomorrow. I've ridden my new road bike for 10 days (about 150 miles) and feel pretty comfortable on it except for some stiff neck, but I thought I'd have a professional fitter look at me on the bike and see if anything should be changed for better rider experience.

Just curious, how long did it take you to be "painless" on your road bike?
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Old 05-10-14, 11:31 PM
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Originally Posted by 2702 View Post
A Trek Domane is almost like riding a lazyboy chair. Don't see how all roadbikes are painful. In my exp, both roadbikes and hybrids are equally tiresome over several hours made easier only by how well the bike has been fitted to YOU.
I like how hybrids feels in the city but dislike climbing hills in them. The bar ends do not feel as good as with hoods on a roadbike on hills. Its best to just get one of each if you are really into bikes, just the serious bargains and hard core bikes are all road bikes. High end Hybrid bikes have no selection its either the FX 7.7 or Sirrus LTDs, or Cannondale Carbon Quicks, I can say most of those are overpriced compared to the great value in CAAD bikes or even aluminum TCR bikes which are crazy light 18.50 pounds for 1350.00. You can buy a light high performance TCR roadbike for 1350 but in Hybird for 1350 its heavy, low components, cheaper build. The makers do not do hybrid fans any justice compared to the scale they pay to roadbike riders.

FWIW just put in your due time with Road bikes, they get much more comfortable once you get stronger with the muscles needed for biking. Its not normal to get low in the roadbike position. I was aching and moaning and its all gone now.
You are joking right?

Here are the specs on my hybrid..

Specialized Bicycle Components

Guess it's pretty 'low end components' huh?
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Old 05-10-14, 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by daihard View Post
I'm going to have bike fitting done tomorrow. I've ridden my new road bike for 10 days (about 150 miles) and feel pretty comfortable on it except for some stiff neck, but I thought I'd have a professional fitter look at me on the bike and see if anything should be changed for better rider experience.

Just curious, how long did it take you to be "painless" on your road bike?
On my Trek Madone 2.1 it took maybe 10 days to get adjusted to the stock settings, now I find the bars are too high and I want to reach lower.
On my CAAD perfect from day 1, that 80mm stem and 10 rise is really equally as comfortable as any hybrid I have been on.
On my old Giant Defy I never got the right combination fit and sold the bike.
So really its hit or miss, each bike is a little higher there and a little lower there, Russian roulette with bikes, you never know, could feel great in the parking lot test ride and pain and misery 2 hrs into your day long ride.
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Old 05-10-14, 11:47 PM
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Originally Posted by raqball View Post
You are joking right?

Here are the specs on my hybrid..

Specialized Bicycle Components

Guess it's pretty 'low end components' huh?
To be fair, your Sirrus Limited L4 is most probably a flat-bar road bike rather than a hybrid. Given that the frame sizes are given in centimetres instead of inches, I'm pretty sure the L4 shares the frame with a dropbar Specialized, much like the Trek 7.7 FX has the same frame as the Madone 3.
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Old 05-10-14, 11:52 PM
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Originally Posted by daihard View Post
To be fair, your Sirrus Limited L4 is most probably a flat-bar road bike rather than a hybrid. Given that the frame sizes are given in centimetres instead of inches, I'm pretty sure the L4 shares the frame with a dropbar Specialized, much like the Trek 7.7 FX has the same frame as the Madone 3.
Yes it's the SL4 Roubaix frame..
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Old 05-10-14, 11:52 PM
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Originally Posted by 2702 View Post
On my Trek Madone 2.1 it took maybe 10 days to get adjusted to the stock settings, now I find the bars are too high and I want to reach lower.
On my CAAD perfect from day 1, that 80mm stem and 10 rise is really equally as comfortable as any hybrid I have been on.
On my old Giant Defy I never got the right combination fit and sold the bike.
So really its hit or miss, each bike is a little higher there and a little lower there, Russian roulette with bikes, you never know, could feel great in the parking lot test ride and pain and misery 2 hrs into your day long ride.
Thanks! Did the 80mm stem come with your CAAD or did you have the LBS swap it when you bought it? I vaguely remember someone mentioning an 80mm stem in another post. Could it have been you?
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Old 05-11-14, 12:01 AM
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Originally Posted by daihard View Post
Thanks! Did the 80mm stem come with your CAAD or did you have the LBS swap it when you bought it? I vaguely remember someone mentioning an 80mm stem in another post. Could it have been you?
MY LBS did not offer a stem swap, had to pay for the 80mm stem. 80mm stems are great for short torso people or creaking backs, I only noticed a little bit of a twitchy feel for a few rides but now I am completely used to it. Most seasoned riders will say your bike is too big if you need 80mm but I don't agree with that.
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