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Home exercise bike..help

Old 08-12-21, 10:46 AM
  #26  
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There is btw a sub-forum on indoor cycling here.

Paletons are expensive to buy and expensive if you subscribe to their service.

There is a lot to be said for using a virtual platform because spinning away indoors on a stationary bike is boring enough. I'm not a salesmen for anything in the bicycle industry but in my judgement using Zwift or a similar platform is one way to keep it at least semi-interesting. For this reason, that is using something like Zwift, a smart trainer is a good idea. You can buy a Wahoo KIKR Snap wheel-on trainer that you attach your bike to for about $500. Zwift costs $16/month. You would need a laptop or tablet that will run Zwift so look into that. A smart trainer is nice because the virtual program feeds back into the trainer to simulate going up hills.

When you think you have it narrowed down check youtube there are tons of vids for just about everything out there.
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Old 08-12-21, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I'm thinking of getting a dedicated indoor smart bike. I've been using an Elite direct drive trainer for a couple of years and while it's great, I don't think it does my bike a lot of good. I could buy a cheap bike to keep permanently on the trainer, but I prefer the idea of a complete standalone solution. Expensive though, so that keeps putting me off. My smart trainer was £500 vs £2k+ for a decent smart bike. But I would use it enough to justify the expense. A Kickr trainer is £1k these days, so by the time I add the cost of another bike to go with it I might as well just get the full Kickr bike.
I have a Kickr Bike and it's awesome, do not regret purchasing it for a second. Did the Smart Trainer thing before and was just not as stable and comfortable. Takes up less space and permanently sits ready to go in my exercise room. As far as cost goes that's a personnel decision and as someone who has travelled extensively, a vast majority of the world would consider the spending and products talked about on this forum as a ridiculous waste of money.
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Old 08-12-21, 03:53 PM
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AGoodrich There is another type of stationary bike which I don’t think has been mentioned, slotting in between basic stationaries (and spin bikes, which are fixed gear) and uber tech smart bikes (and Peloton uber-spin), which are the Cycleops powermeter stationaries.

While the first versions were fixed gear spin bikes, the second and ultimate gen bikes moved to freewheel drivetrains to more accurately reproduce the feel of road cycling. Most importantly, though, all the Cycleops bikes featured their famous PowerTap technology, which allows you to train accurately and efficiently using wattage output. Resistance adjustment is still done manually via a knob, so they’re not “smart” in the common sense, but the smartness only makes those bikes more sophisticated and fun to use in some scenarios, with the most effective element being the power meter.

All the Cycleops bikes connect via ANT+ to a head unit for bike data readout (i.e. power, cadence, speed), and will display heart rate when a heart rate sensor is paired as well.

I don’t know where you’re located, but here are two on eBay in the UK, Phantom being the final iteration of the series, and the 300 Pro a 2nd gen bike. Also, disregard the comment on the Phantom saying a subscription to Rouvy is required; it is not:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/114927497...UAAOSwzQ5hEBsz

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/133837701...EAAOSwxJxhCWDb
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Old 08-12-21, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
AGoodrich There is another type of stationary bike which I don’t think has been mentioned, slotting in between basic stationaries (and spin bikes, which are fixed gear) and uber tech smart bikes (and Peloton uber-spin), which are the Cycleops powermeter stationaries.

While the first versions were fixed gear spin bikes, the second and ultimate gen bikes moved to freewheel drivetrains to more accurately reproduce the feel of road cycling. Most importantly, though, all the Cycleops bikes featured their famous PowerTap technology, which allows you to train accurately and efficiently using wattage output. Resistance adjustment is still done manually via a knob, so they’re not “smart” in the common sense, but the smartness only makes those bikes more sophisticated and fun to use in some scenarios, with the most effective element being the power meter.

All the Cycleops bikes connect via ANT+ to a head unit for bike data readout (i.e. power, cadence, speed), and will display heart rate when a heart rate sensor is paired as well.

I don’t know where you’re located, but here are two on eBay in the UK, Phantom being the final iteration of the series, and the 300 Pro a 2nd gen bike. Also, disregard the comment on the Phantom saying a subscription to Rouvy is required; it is not:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/114927497...UAAOSwzQ5hEBsz

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/133837701...EAAOSwxJxhCWDb
Don’t bother I had one and was forced to sell it. The Phantom 5 had servo motor resistance which was not very linear and lagged behind the software. Really suffered from cadence drop lockup, if cadenced dropped resistance really piled on until were forced to stop pedaling. Only software which recognizes it is Rouvy and it is not fe-c capable which limits any other software from controlling the unit. Virtual shifting is not intuitive and realistic. Replacement parts are very difficult to source.

Amazing tech for the times but unfortunately like many tech forward products does not age well.
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Old 08-13-21, 05:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
I have a Kickr Bike and it's awesome, do not regret purchasing it for a second. Did the Smart Trainer thing before and was just not as stable and comfortable. Takes up less space and permanently sits ready to go in my exercise room. As far as cost goes that's a personnel decision and as someone who has travelled extensively, a vast majority of the world would consider the spending and products talked about on this forum as a ridiculous waste of money.
Thanks for the recommendation. I've been reading the reviews, especially DCRainmaker's. My only reservation with the Kickr Bike is reliability. It looks like some early adopters had teething troubles often requiring replacement bikes. I presume yours has been reliable? How long have you had the Kickr Bike? Hopefully now it's been on the market for a year or so, reliability/QC has improved.

I'm also looking at the Stages bike, which looks really solid, but doesn't have the slope tilt function of the Kickr Bike, which I really like since I do a lot of climbing simulation on the trainer. There's also the Wattbike Atom 2 which is quite a lot cheaper in the UK. But it seems like it still has issues with ERG mode and I'm not too keen on the "aero" styling.

At least there are more choices in this market now. Last time I was looking for a complete bike (around 2018), only the original Atom was available. I ended up buying a Matrix U50 gym bike (as my wife wanted to use it too), which was okay for fitness, but the position is not very realistic for road biking and you are limited to Matrix proprietary software. But at least it had ERG mode and the inductance resistance drivetrain was extremely smooth and quiet. But without Zwift, Rouvy, Sufferfest etc it was a pretty dull experience. So I soon moved to a direct drive smart trainer (Elite Direto X) for all my indoor bike training. I'm just missing the ultimate convenience of a standalone bike trainer and the ride feel of the Direto is not the best. It's very good for the money, but considering how much indoor training I do these days I could easily justify an upgrade.
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Old 08-13-21, 06:20 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
Don’t bother I had one and was forced to sell it. The Phantom 5 had servo motor resistance which was not very linear and lagged behind the software. Really suffered from cadence drop lockup, if cadenced dropped resistance really piled on until were forced to stop pedaling. Only software which recognizes it is Rouvy and it is not fe-c capable which limits any other software from controlling the unit. Virtual shifting is not intuitive and realistic. Replacement parts are very difficult to source.

Amazing tech for the times but unfortunately like many tech forward products does not age well.
Interesting. I wasn’t aware of the Phantom 5 issues you experienced, and have no familiarity with it’s smart bike functionality. I have been riding CycleOps bikes at a cycling training studio for 11 years, and have used the 300 PT, 300 Pro, and Phantom 3 models for coached, power-based training, which is the basis for my insight and why I described those bikes as being in-between basic stationaries/“dumb” trainers and smart trainers.

Just using the native functionality, those bikes are extremely reliable. We’ve got about 12 of them which have gotten pounded by hundreds of riders for thousands of hours, and even the 300 PTs, which I’m sure are close to 20 years old, are still running. They’ve been maintained, of course, and there have been failures of things like clamp levers and head unit brackets, so I don’t want to paint a picture of perfection, but that’s also in a commercial use setting.

To the extent the Phantom 5 is different, I don’t know; I had thought it could be operated manually as previous and lower-line models, but it sounds like you’re saying there may be problems even in doing that, which is good to know.
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Old 08-13-21, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Interesting. I wasn’t aware of the Phantom 5 issues you experienced, and have no familiarity with it’s smart bike functionality. I have been riding CycleOps bikes at a cycling training studio for 11 years, and have used the 300 PT, 300 Pro, and Phantom 3 models for coached, power-based training, which is the basis for my insight and why I described those bikes as being in-between basic stationaries/“dumb” trainers and smart trainers.

Just using the native functionality, those bikes are extremely reliable. We’ve got about 12 of them which have gotten pounded by hundreds of riders for thousands of hours, and even the 300 PTs, which I’m sure are close to 20 years old, are still running. They’ve been maintained, of course, and there have been failures of things like clamp levers and head unit brackets, so I don’t want to paint a picture of perfection, but that’s also in a commercial use setting.

To the extent the Phantom 5 is different, I don’t know; I had thought it could be operated manually as previous and lower-line models, but it sounds like you’re saying there may be problems even in doing that, which is good to know.
In a training studio I'm sure they work fine. Those bikes remind me of my old Kettler ErgoRacer from a few decades ago. But for home use, full smart functionality is definitely the way to go for most people. There are so many great cycling apps out there now (Zwift, Rouvy, Bkool, Sufferfest, TrainerRoad, etc, etc) that just make the whole experience more immersive and productive. I wouldn't buy any trainer that wasn't fully 2-way controllable by these apps. It's not like you need a massive budget for a Smart trainer these days either.
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Old 08-13-21, 08:46 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
In a training studio I'm sure they work fine. Those bikes remind me of my old Kettler ErgoRacer from a few decades ago. But for home use, full smart functionality is definitely the way to go for most people. There are so many great cycling apps out there now (Zwift, Rouvy, Bkool, Sufferfest, TrainerRoad, etc, etc) that just make the whole experience more immersive and productive. I wouldn't buy any trainer that wasn't fully 2-way controllable by these apps. It's not like you need a massive budget for a Smart trainer these days either.
It doesn’t take a massive budget to get a smart trainer, but smart bikes are another matter, and the OP was looking for bike, no? Otherwise, yeah, I agree smart trainers are pretty nice— I use a Kickr trainer at home— and open up a variety of experiences which enrichen the stationary cycling experience.

Of course, an enriched experience is not necessarily a better experience, and it depends on what you want to do. I’ve been on Zwift since it was in beta, but I can just as easily spend an hour staring at power, cadence, and time on a CycleOps head unit while doing a scripted workout, so it’s not as though the smart/interactive experience was so much better for me that it displaced CycleOps workouts. In fact, I only do CycleOps and outdoor rides (IRL) during the summer, adding in the Kickr over the winter for additional ride time (mostly endurance) since IRL ride volume drops.

My situation is pretty unique as I think there are relatively few people who go to cycling training specific studios for power based workouts, but there are certainly tons of people who use “dumb” stationary bikes and trainers every day for workouts and general fitness routines, so an intermediate step, where they’re adding the element of power, may be appealing. And for the OP, who’s looking to spend up to £1k on a stationary bike, probably a smart stationary is well out of budget.

Were money no issue for me, I’m with you and would go full smart bike, probably getting a Kickr bike, but $3.5kUSD is an extravagance I can’t swing right now, and I prefer spending my money on personal training, so that I can have the benefit of the insight, analysis, and encouragement of my coach, as well as access to organized IRL training rides and travel camps which he organizes through the studio and that I really enjoy. But, everyone’s desires, needs, and accessibility are different, so it’s good we have some options.
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Old 08-13-21, 09:27 AM
  #34  
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Old 08-13-21, 10:13 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Interesting. I wasn’t aware of the Phantom 5 issues you experienced, and have no familiarity with it’s smart bike functionality. I have been riding CycleOps bikes at a cycling training studio for 11 years, and have used the 300 PT, 300 Pro, and Phantom 3 models for coached, power-based training, which is the basis for my insight and why I described those bikes as being in-between basic stationaries/“dumb” trainers and smart trainers.

Just using the native functionality, those bikes are extremely reliable. We’ve got about 12 of them which have gotten pounded by hundreds of riders for thousands of hours, and even the 300 PTs, which I’m sure are close to 20 years old, are still running. They’ve been maintained, of course, and there have been failures of things like clamp levers and head unit brackets, so I don’t want to paint a picture of perfection, but that’s also in a commercial use setting.

To the extent the Phantom 5 is different, I don’t know; I had thought it could be operated manually as previous and lower-line models, but it sounds like you’re saying there may be problems even in doing that, which is good to know.
I am with you they are built like a Tank and if you want an Exercise bike that measures power you can't do any better in the used market, makes an original Peloton look like a toy. The Smart version ended up in a technological dead-end however was leading edge when it came out.
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Old 08-13-21, 10:27 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Thanks for the recommendation. I've been reading the reviews, especially DCRainmaker's. My only reservation with the Kickr Bike is reliability. It looks like some early adopters had teething troubles often requiring replacement bikes. I presume yours has been reliable? How long have you had the Kickr Bike? Hopefully now it's been on the market for a year or so, reliability/QC has improved.

I'm also looking at the Stages bike, which looks really solid, but doesn't have the slope tilt function of the Kickr Bike, which I really like since I do a lot of climbing simulation on the trainer. There's also the Wattbike Atom 2 which is quite a lot cheaper in the UK. But it seems like it still has issues with ERG mode and I'm not too keen on the "aero" styling.

At least there are more choices in this market now. Last time I was looking for a complete bike (around 2018), only the original Atom was available. I ended up buying a Matrix U50 gym bike (as my wife wanted to use it too), which was okay for fitness, but the position is not very realistic for road biking and you are limited to Matrix proprietary software. But at least it had ERG mode and the inductance resistance drivetrain was extremely smooth and quiet. But without Zwift, Rouvy, Sufferfest etc it was a pretty dull experience. So I soon moved to a direct drive smart trainer (Elite Direto X) for all my indoor bike training. I'm just missing the ultimate convenience of a standalone bike trainer and the ride feel of the Direto is not the best. It's very good for the money, but considering how much indoor training I do these days I could easily justify an upgrade.
When it came time to replace my Cycleops smart bike I choose the Kickr Bike and don't regret it. Luckily I didn't read the internet reviews prior to purchase or I may have reconsidered, no issue at all with mine and has been dead reliable. No issues with integration with any of the apps either, tried most of the ones for a minimum of the trial period. That said, it could shut down today! On another positive note, nothing but good things have been said regarding customer service. I thought the tilt function would be gimmicky but it really adds a sense of reality to a workout and miss it when not enabled.
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Old 08-14-21, 02:10 PM
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I know a number of people that have Kickr bikes, and most all of them are thrilled with them. There are issues - but probably a little fewer than the Wattbikes, based on the people I know - not a huge sample of either, to be fair.

I will say that the Schwinn IC4 has a really bad reputation - it's reportedly inaccurate, power readings change over time, and apparently has a limited number of calibrations before it bricks. You'd be better off buying a used PowerTap wheel and a magnetic or fluid dumb trainer.
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Old 04-29-22, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Mooree View Post
If you've ever had to switch home gym equipment, you know that most of these items aren't light. How much does a Peloton bike weigh? Despite being relatively compact and slim, the Peloton bike is considerably heavier than one would expect. The Peloton bike weighs between 135 and 140 pounds.
They may be heavy, but I can't say it's ever been a practical issue. Most of these bikes are easy enough to wheel around if necessary. My Kickr Bike is a fairly heavy beast, but it has two wheels at the rear that make it easy to move. I just roll it up against the wall when I'm not using it.
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Old 06-24-22, 07:50 AM
  #39  
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Smile The advantage of exercise bikes for home

When you want to pedal in any weather, when physical activity is an important component in life, when you need to lose weight and get in perfect physical shape, home exercise bikes come to the rescue.
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Old 06-24-22, 07:52 AM
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Why do you need a treadmill at home?

The ancients said: "If you want to be strong - run, beautiful - run, smart - run!".

Indeed, jogging has an effective effect not only on the human body but also on his state of mind, and his psyche. With regular exercise, the overall tone increases, and the mood improves. As they say, who runs, he wants to live.

In jogging, which is called jogging, that is, shuffling, there is one serious advantage over regular running, speedrunning. This is the minimum chance of injury by reducing the load on the musculoskeletal system.
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Old 06-24-22, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by majmt View Post
I think the good ‘ol no frills Schwinn Airdyne is still of one of the best pieces of exercise equipment out there.
Except for the noise, it's a good unit. but not for me...
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Old 06-28-22, 04:47 AM
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Home exercice bike

Recumbent Bike Workouts

Training on a recumbent bike is more stable than on an upright bike, so people with balance problems find it more suitable. For those who cannot exercise on simulators regularly and do it rarely, but for a long time, it is certainly better for such people to choose a horizontal exercise bike or a treadmill. Exercising on a recumbent stationary bike puts less stress on your lower back. This allows the user to continue exercising for a longer period of time. Recumbent bikes are a great way to build muscle in your legs and glutes and lose weight.
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Old 06-28-22, 02:15 PM
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@Joseph76 Are you a bot?
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Old 06-28-22, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
@Joseph76 Are you a bot?
Sure looks like one based on those replies! Ask him to say "pizza" and see what happens.
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Old 06-30-22, 04:54 AM
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dmanthree did not understand your idea a little, can you be more precise? Thanks
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Old 06-30-22, 04:59 AM
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Bike

The recumbent bike is an ergonomic exercise bike that allows the athlete to sit in a reclining, recumbent position. Sitting on an exercise bike helps the athlete to keep the back relaxed. On a recumbent stationary bike, the weight of the body, especially the back and buttocks, is distributed over a large area, unlike conventional stationary bikes, in which the athlete sits upright and the body weight is concentrated on the buttocks. These advantages of the recumbent bike have made it very popular with health-conscious people. Below are the many benefits of a recumbent exercise bike.
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Old 06-30-22, 11:49 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Joseph76 View Post
dmanthree did not understand your idea a little, can you be more precise? Thanks
Yes. Say "pizza."

Man, what a robotic reply. So sad.
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Old 07-15-22, 07:22 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
The biggest decision here is between a "Spin bike" vs "Smart bike".

Spin bikes typically have a manual resistance control knob and don't simulate slopes or gearing. Peloton is really just a fancy spin bike. A good packaged solution for bringing the traditional gym bike spin group exercise experience home.

Smart bikes can do it all. They can be used like a spin bike or used to simulate real life riding with slopes and gear changes, typically used with Apps like Zwift. This kind of bike would be my preference if you are looking at a complete bike:-

Yahoo Kickr Bike
Tacx Neo Smart Bike
Stages Smart Bike
Wattbike Atom

My personal experience of both spin bikes and smart bikes/trainers is that you soon get thoroughly bored of the former, especially if you are looking to improve your outdoor cycling performance. If you get a smart bike you have every type of bike training covered.
I made the mistake of buying a spin type bike first (Matrix U50) and while it had ERG mode for training accurately with power, it wasn't smart enough to connect with 3rd party apps like Zwift. I used it for 1 winter before moving to a smart trainer with my own bike. But those complete smart bikes I listed above are standalone versions of their smart trainers. None of those smart bikes existed when I bought my spin bike otherwise I would have gone straight down that route.

Hope this helps a little.
I am a blogger and I read your entire post about the peloton Bike. This is quite helpful for me and it is quite helpful for others too. NIce information dear.
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Old 07-15-22, 11:32 AM
  #49  
dmark 
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I use an old bike in a cheap mag trainer and free youtube videos https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...raining+videos
when I can't go out ie winter.
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