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-   -   New Long Island Rider (https://www.bikeforums.net/introductions/1209333-new-long-island-rider.html)

The 2nd G 08-04-20 09:21 AM

New Long Island Rider
 
I'm a runner who always wanted a bike. At 52, I was worried about spending too much money on a bike, so I did some research and got a great deal on a brand new 2014 (crazy, I know) Raleigh Ravenio 2.0 from a reputable local bike shop. My plan is to ride it for 2 years and then move on to a better bike. Anyway, I've been having a LOT of fun this spring/summer riding, but have had some minor issues that I tried to fix myself by watching YouTube videos, but for most ended up having to go to the bike store to have a mechanic fix it (no charge, although I did give him a tip a few times).

Then, I come on this forum (and of course watched tons of YouTube videos) and see that most people seem to be able to work on their own road bikes. I'm discouraged a bit, but I love the sport so much and don't see myself falling away from it any time soon. It would be great if I had a buddy who was a bike expert, but I don't. Also, the local groups suspended their rides because of the pandemic. Sure, I could Strava-stalk the people I seem to ride past or near regularly, but that seems shady to me.

Does anyone have any ideas as to how to learn basic (and beyond) bike repair skills?

blacknbluebikes 08-04-20 10:43 AM

Buy the Park Tool Blue Book. A real paper one. I've had one for ages and still go-to for things I don't do often. Other books are good, too. (Zinn, for example)
Then you just have to start tuning things when they seem off (probably not often) and fixing them if they break (probably rare).
Learn to clean and lube your chain, that's regular maintenance. Learn to change a flat when you only have the road tools from your underseat bag - tire levers, a tube and an inflator.
Learn to really search this forum - I'd guess that 90% of all cycling knowledge is in here somewhere, if you can find it. Do that, so that when you do ask (and you should), some barky dog here doesn't finger-wag ya.
You know everything's right if you bike does what you expect it to and does it quietly.

Steve B. 08-04-20 02:22 PM

The YT videos are sometimes only useful when you can accurately describe what’s happening. Sometimes and when you are new at it, you don’t really know what’s wrong, thus will have a problem finding the correct YT that can show you how to fix something.

I agree with BlacnkNBlue about the Park book, good reference. They make good tools as well.

The 2nd G 08-06-20 07:57 AM

Thanks for the replies, guys--will order the book right away.

GlennR 08-06-20 08:34 AM

Normally i'd invite you over but due to Cobid, i'm not getting too close to anyone outside of my family.

Where are you located?

bike2thespot 08-06-20 01:12 PM

I'm pretty new to doing my own maintenance as well and Sheldon Brown's website has been such an amazing resource so far. Especially paired with Park Tool's and RJ the Bike Guy's videos.


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