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Old 03-26-14, 12:49 PM
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DeeGee68
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Hi ALL!

Hi ALL!

I have decided to start cycling for exercise and pleasure (yes, in the same sentence) LOL

I used to ride a Cannondale Rush 5 mountain bike a few years ago but gave this to my younger brother as it was a more serious bikers' bike and a real off-road machine. I used it to ride in Paris where there were some really nice scenic trails nothing harsh and enjoyed it but struggled on the roads.

I recently went to my 'local' Evans Cycle shop to 'window shop' and couldn't resist taking one of their hybrid bikes out for a test ride as the weather was good and it was a Sunday!!!

The bike in question was a Specialized Sirrus Pro Disc 2014 in a large size, as I am 6ft 2ins. I did not see a price tag on the bike at the time or just did not register seeing it.

All I can say is WOW!!! I had never thought I would like riding a bike so much and it was very comfortable and responsive. The bike is possibly a quarter of the weight of my old Rush 5 and a hell of a lot faster, let alone faster!

When I returned back to the shop I did have a really 'BIG' smile on my face until I was told the price!!!! 2000!!!!!

Now the dilemma, as I have taken this bike out I just do not want to consider any other bike as I believe the frame is the same as the Specialized Roubaix racing bike. So technically, if I were to at a later date want to go for a road bike, all I would have o do would be swap out some of the components.....? Some of you will be thinking 'more money than brains' and I would agree with you BUT I like buying quality products that will last the test of time.

I have been trying to research the bike but as it is one of the new bikes in the 2014 Specialized range there are few and far between. If anyone already has one on this forum i would love to hear their assessment of this bike.

I am lucky that my employer will give me an interest free loan over 12 months for the purpose of buying a bike with no upper limit. I have spoken to them about this bike and purchasing additional accessories such as a quality lock, helmet, lights etc and they have agreed in principal.

I have thought of purchasing a cheaper bike but they just do not come close to the Specialized in my honest opinion! I really feel it is the bike for me.....!

Your thoughts and advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for reading.

David.
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Old 03-26-14, 12:56 PM
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10 Wheels
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Hey David,

Welcome to Bike Forums.

Enjoy The New bike.

Check for used bikes in your area.

I bought these two last year.

A 2003 model with 600 miles for $200



A 2005 with 25 miles for $600


Sold the wheels for $235
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Old 03-26-14, 12:57 PM
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JamesRL
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You owe it to yourself to take a deep breath and go to some other shops and try some other brands and models. You need a basis of comparison.

You need to ask yourself:
Do I want a road bike or a hybrid?
Do I want a racer? Do I want to commute (and carry stuff)? Do I want to tour (and carry more stuff)?

There are many many bike lighter and faster than what you have. But know that part of that is just going to narrower wheels and a lighter frame, which you can get on a much much less expensive bike.

To be honest, unless and until you build up your engine (your body), you won't see the difference between a a bike that costs half the price and your dream bike, if they are of the same type.
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Old 03-26-14, 01:10 PM
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DeeGee68
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Originally Posted by JamesRL View Post
You owe it to yourself to take a deep breath and go to some other shops and try some other brands and models. You need a basis of comparison.

You need to ask yourself:
Do I want a road bike or a hybrid?
Do I want a racer? Do I want to commute (and carry stuff)? Do I want to tour (and carry more stuff)?

There are many many bike lighter and faster than what you have. But know that part of that is just going to narrower wheels and a lighter frame, which you can get on a much much less expensive bike.

To be honest, unless and until you build up your engine (your body), you won't see the difference between a a bike that costs half the price and your dream bike, if they are of the same type.
Hi James,

Thanks for the 'heads up'! I did try a Pinnacle, Scott and a Trek which were all hybrid a while back at similar price but never got around to buying one. I do not want a racer due to my back and the lower riding position or another mountain bike as will be commuting to work and not a lot of off road. I do not want to buy a cheaper bike only to upgrade everything and end up spending more in the long run. I also want a quality frame that is light and will hopefully last a lifetime with good maintenance. Hence, my surfing the Hybrid section and reading the posts on buying a bike.

What I have read points to investing a bit more than you initially set yourself and then once you get more experienced selling the bike to only purchase another bike at extra expense with better components. I am just trying to get the bike that is a quality product and it would appear that the reputation of Specialized is supposedly second to none.

I appreciate your views and have to say I am now trying to research other bikes...! I suppose the only person who will know which bike is best for them is the one going to ride it....

David.
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Old 03-26-14, 01:37 PM
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Well David much depends on your goals.

As for a frame lasting, I've seen very few frame failures, and cost of the frame rarely has anything to do with it. Back in the 80s, when I was a very active rider, the only frames that failed regularly were the glued aluminum ones and those were pretty exotic. And a light frame isn't nearly as important in my experience as light wheels. Back in the day (at a wheel building class) someone said that if you took a $1000 bike and a $100 bike and swapped wheels, the pro rider would pick the $100 bike.

With good maintenance even a bike a quarter of the price of your prize will last. There are lots of racers out there from 20 years ago and more.

As for Specialized being the be all and end all, I will say this. Just like most computer, phone and other products, most manufacturing is farmed out. A couple of companies in Taiwan make frames and build bikes for many bike companies. They do it based on different specifications, which may be based on performance, price point and other marketing targets. So I wouldn't say Specialized is a bad company. Just that I don't have a basis to think their bikes, most of which are made in Taiwan, are head and shoulders above bikes made by the same workers in the same plant, using the same drivetrain components as other makers. The difference between them is likely down to frame geometry, and much of that is personal preference.

If you are going to spend that kind of money, or even half as much, find a shop that will do the measurements and fit you. That may mean just adjusting the existing parts or in some cases, swapping out with other parts to get the fit right.

I may have a different perspective. I've done commuting, long distance touring, and ridden racers. I've never raced, but I did do training rides with some triathelete friends.

Racers want better components to shave a few grams off or get a better gear ratio or faster shifts. But in normal usage, barring accidents, bikes don't break (other than wheels, which are wear items anyway). There are 40 year old derailleurs that have been used all that time and still work. Oh you will see the occasional issue, often from lack of lubrication, normal maintence, being left out in the rain, or being maintained by someone who didn't know what they are doing. Oh and chains, they do wear, but much faster if they aren't maintained properly. Fortunately chains, tires and tubes are cheap, and a broken rim can be replaced.
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Old 03-26-14, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by JamesRL View Post
Well David much depends on your goals.

As for a frame lasting, I've seen very few frame failures, and cost of the frame rarely has anything to do with it. Back in the 80s, when I was a very active rider, the only frames that failed regularly were the glued aluminum ones and those were pretty exotic. And a light frame isn't nearly as important in my experience as light wheels. Back in the day (at a wheel building class) someone said that if you took a $1000 bike and a $100 bike and swapped wheels, the pro rider would pick the $100 bike.

With good maintenance even a bike a quarter of the price of your prize will last. There are lots of racers out there from 20 years ago and more.

As for Specialized being the be all and end all, I will say this. Just like most computer, phone and other products, most manufacturing is farmed out. A couple of companies in Taiwan make frames and build bikes for many bike companies. They do it based on different specifications, which may be based on performance, price point and other marketing targets. So I wouldn't say Specialized is a bad company. Just that I don't have a basis to think their bikes, most of which are made in Taiwan, are head and shoulders above bikes made by the same workers in the same plant, using the same drivetrain components as other makers. The difference between them is likely down to frame geometry, and much of that is personal preference.

If you are going to spend that kind of money, or even half as much, find a shop that will do the measurements and fit you. That may mean just adjusting the existing parts or in some cases, swapping out with other parts to get the fit right.

I may have a different perspective. I've done commuting, long distance touring, and ridden racers. I've never raced, but I did do training rides with some triathelete friends.

Racers want better components to shave a few grams off or get a better gear ratio or faster shifts. But in normal usage, barring accidents, bikes don't break (other than wheels, which are wear items anyway). There are 40 year old derailleurs that have been used all that time and still work. Oh you will see the occasional issue, often from lack of lubrication, normal maintence, being left out in the rain, or being maintained by someone who didn't know what they are doing. Oh and chains, they do wear, but much faster if they aren't maintained properly. Fortunately chains, tires and tubes are cheap, and a broken rim can be replaced.
Thanks for that James.

These were the bikes I was considering;

Cannondale Quick Carbon 2 2014

Specialized Sirrus Pro Disc 2014

Trek 7.7 FX 2014

BMC Alpenchallenge AC01 Alfine 11 2014

Out of them the only one I have not tried is the Trek as not in stock....!

I spent about 45 minutes getting 'fitted' in the store before venturing out on the Specialized. I was then told that there is an electronic system of fitting that is better than the manual one I had for the Specialized!!

I have approximately 6 weeks to decide on the bike as that is how long it will take to process my application.....!

I want to have a quality bike with quality components and not just a bike that has a good frame but the components are 'neglected' to keep the price down.

Maybe this post now needs to go to the Hybrid section.....?
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Old 03-26-14, 02:04 PM
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Quality components. I'd have to tell you that again from my experience, going up one level of component doesn't get you a huge improvement in anything. It might be a bit lighter, but on a hybrid you aren't looking for an ultralight, and a few grams won't mean much (except on the wheels). The more you pay, the lighter you get, it may shift a fraction faster but again, tough to notice. I don't think anyone ever won a race because they ran DURA ACE versus Ultegra.
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Old 03-26-14, 06:14 PM
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