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What do you see the wave of the future for road cycling?

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What do you see the wave of the future for road cycling?

Old 10-03-15, 02:17 AM
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What do you see the wave of the future for road cycling?

Do you think that automated driven cars in the future will get more cars off the road and more infrastructure built? I would like to think positive. I really would like a future world that revolves around cycling. Even if it's 20 years from now. I want cycling paradise. It's better for the environment. It's better for the health of society. We don't need so many cars. In an ideal world, everyone should be cycling to work at a reasonable distance.
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Old 10-03-15, 09:02 AM
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if they can regulate us into self driving cars, imagine what they won't do for bicycles. I envision mandatory transponders so the traffic computers can keep track of bicyclists and pedestrians. next I envision stability regulations leading to the outlawing of true two wheeled bicycles, in favor of tricycles and quadracycles. next sustainability regulations will all but outlaw simple bicycle manufacturing techniques and materials, while mandating other inferior materials due to recyclability issues. not to mention mandatory safety gear safety wear prohibitions as to where and how you can ride your bicycle speed limits, and some sort of interactive navigation device that will be mandatory to follow. all these expensive requirements will be accompanied by additional taxes to pay for the whole shebang. if you don't believe me just look what they have done to automobiles.
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Old 10-03-15, 09:10 AM
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I think obsessing over the future, and potential "what ifs" is nothing more than a negative distraction that will likely spoil ones experiences in the "here and now".
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Old 10-03-15, 09:16 AM
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IDK. Having been around for over 60years and having ridden and driven for over 40, I don't think things will be all that much different in another 20. Yeah, there will be some vehicles with more self-driving capabilities, and a bit more infrastructure in urban and some suburban areas, but by and large it won't be that different from what's going on now. But it's also been tricky trying to forecast the future.

The major changes I have witnessed in all those years are greatly reduced pollution and improved reliability of cars. Oh yeah, and tech providing more opportunities for distracting the driver. I expect that it'll starting going the other way with tech innovations starting to improve driver and cyclist's safety.
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Old 10-03-15, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Looigi
IDK. Having been around for over 60years and having ridden and driven for over 40, I don't think things will be all that much different in another 20. Yeah, there will be some vehicles with more self-driving capabilities, and a bit more infrastructure in urban and some suburban areas, but by and large it won't be that different from what's going on now. But it's also been tricky trying to forecast the future.

The major changes I have witnessed in all those years are greatly reduced pollution and improved reliability of cars. Oh yeah, and tech providing more opportunities for distracting the driver. I expect that it'll starting going the other way with tech innovations starting to improve driver and cyclist's safety.
Any progress is good progress
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Old 10-03-15, 11:37 AM
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For cycling on roads I can see bicycle companies de-emphasising true 'road racing' rigs (CF everything, ultra-light components, faster at the finish line, etc) in favor of more road friendly bicycles built with more sturdy materials and techniques to handle the potholes and small pieces of junk found everyday on the road, plus the heavier weights of the everyday riders (those pros are pretty lightweight dudes!); something more like a touring bicycle rather than a bicycle orientated toward road racing or time-trialing. It'll work for long rides, workout rides, and an occasional race. Just my two cents.

Self-driving cars? Boy that's going to be rough on everyone (bicyclists and other vehicle drivers), especially at the start when the unknown software glitches cause accidents. I kinda like driving a car without all the electronic monitoring doo-dads and entertainment crap - just get out there, pay attention to the road, listen to the engine and transmission 'singing' below your butt, and enjoy being behind the wheel!
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Old 10-03-15, 11:50 AM
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Cycling will never become mainstream unless you make bike lanes a solid part of all city infastructure. Most people simply just don't feel comfortable riding on the same road as cars. This is why cycling is so incredibly succesful in countries like Holland and Denmark. With bike lanes on every main street, more people will feel safe with using bikes and it will be more socially accepted because there are designated lanes for cyclists only. Cycling will flourish. Bike lanes, bike lanes. Its all about bike lanes.
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Old 10-03-15, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by mozad655
Cycling will never become mainstream unless you make bike lanes a solid part of all city infastructure. Most people simply just don't feel comfortable riding on the same road as cars. This is why cycling is so incredibly succesful in countries like Holland and Denmark. With bike lanes on every main street, more people will feel safe with using bikes and it will be more socially accepted because there are designated lanes for cyclists only. Cycling will flourish. Bike lanes, bike lanes. Its all about bike lanes.
Don't forget that those bike lanes in Holland n' Denmark are separated from the traffic lanes. So, The urban traveling infrastructure is given equal importance. That is not the case in the U.S.
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Old 10-03-15, 01:12 PM
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Financial entities with so much vested in human driven cars will really push fear of driverless cars and disinformation, like potential software glitches, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that they are extremely safe, and don't require any transponders. They see vastly more than any human can, and don't play favorites about what they will drive into or not. Every year that Google plays it safe by not producing, is another year where 34000 people will die in or by cars crashing.

In the near term I see cycling contracting a bit, but with a long term increase. If driverless cars do come out, more people will ride for the sense of control and freedom, and because it will be percieves as much safer. But, they will encourage many more vehicle miles.
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Old 10-03-15, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by catgita
Financial entities with so much vested in human driven cars will really push fear of driverless cars and disinformation, .
Who?
Major auto manufacturers are developing the vehicles, major software companies are developing the technologies, The insurance industry is cautiously optimistic.........
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Old 10-03-15, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Chris516
Don't forget that those bike lanes in Holland n' Denmark are separated from the traffic lanes. So, The urban traveling infrastructure is given equal importance. That is not the case in the U.S.
Not all of them are separated. Many of them are not. But obviously the separated ones are even better but also more expensive to make. As a cyclist here I don't really notice the difference. Lets get some bike lanes first, then talk about quality. Some is always better than none at all.

I don't know about "urban traveling infrastructure" not being given equal importance. That sounds like a political issue, which will change as popoularity for bicycles grow, which itself will happen if more bike lanes are built. It all starts with bike lanes. Even the worst bike lanes will increase cycling.
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Old 10-03-15, 03:10 PM
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I predict that 20 years from now we will not be seeing many auto driving cars. Also that the OP will still be afraid to ride his bike in traffic.
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Old 10-03-15, 04:24 PM
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Moved from A&S to LCF.
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Old 10-03-15, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by kickstart
I think obsessing over the future, and potential "what ifs" is nothing more than a negative distraction that will likely spoil ones experiences in the "here and now".
Well yeah... good point. Getting too much involved in the future is like setting yourself up for disappointment... the future will likely be so vastly different from what we imagine. *However* it still is appropriate to set some kind of intention for the future, maybe even do some planning.

Your city could set a goal like "we'd like to see bicycle transportation grow to xx per cent..." and then work towards that goal. Failures happen, success happens, but we continue to work in that direction.

You could set a personal goal like "I'd like to eventually do xx percent of my travel by bicycle. I'd like to replace my two-car family to one or even my family would like to get rid of our car and travel by bus/bike/train...
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Old 10-03-15, 05:25 PM
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The OP is concerned about Google and their driverless car. It's a gimmick they use to get the brand in the newspaper and helps keep the stock up. Folks, we are a hundred years or more away from the driverless car society.
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Old 10-03-15, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve
The OP is concerned about Google and their driverless car. It's a gimmick they use to get the brand in the newspaper and helps keep the stock up. Folks, we are a hundred years or more away from the driverless car society.
Well great... I'm still waiting for jet pack they promised me
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Old 10-03-15, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by mozad655
Not all of them are separated. Many of them are not. But obviously the separated ones are even better but also more expensive to make. As a cyclist here I don't really notice the difference. Lets get some bike lanes first, then talk about quality. Some is always better than none at all.

I don't know about "urban traveling infrastructure" not being given equal importance. That sounds like a political issue, which will change as popoularity for bicycles grow, which itself will happen if more bike lanes are built. It all starts with bike lanes. Even the worst bike lanes will increase cycling.
Not a political issue. But one of equality.

Separated: Being able to bike on the street, without having to be in the middle motorized traffic
.
Non-Separated: Being able to ride on the road, within accordance of the traffic code. Without the hostility of motorists who only think cyclists' are only blocking traffic. When the cyclist is sometimes going faster than they motorist. A motorist behaving in the needing something yesterday.
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Old 10-03-15, 06:25 PM
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Here we go again, another science-fiction thread on LCF forum, but this time with a touch of A&S in it.
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Old 10-03-15, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
Here we go again, another science-fiction thread on LCF forum, but this time with a touch of A&S in it.
Better than the usual heavy dose/overdose of P&R though.
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Old 10-03-15, 06:40 PM
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Because we are looking through the Chrystal Ball one obvious thing will be many of us will be taking dirt naps. At least before bicycles hit the five percent market share nationally.

I don't think automated cars are that far off. We already have combat capable drones coming on line so it might not be that far off. Because I can remember how quickly GPS units replaced sextant and chronographs when I was into sailing.

The Google cars are doing reasonably well accident wise if I have read the stats correctly. They do have a problem with people on Fixies and track stands at stop signs but anyone can research that for themselves.

I can't see the vast majority of cyclists going back to heavy weight bikes now that they have experienced light weight materials. At least I know if all they offered were Dutch Bikes and old steel Schwinns I would give up cycling. Just saying climbing 5000 feet on either one of those would turn most people into pedestrians.

I will add that with the new seat tube electric motors e-bikes could become popular.
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Old 10-03-15, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by gerv
Well yeah... good point. Getting too much involved in the future is like setting yourself up for disappointment... the future will likely be so vastly different from what we imagine. *However* it still is appropriate to set some kind of intention for the future, maybe even do some planning.

Your city could set a goal like "we'd like to see bicycle transportation grow to xx per cent..." and then work towards that goal. Failures happen, success happens, but we continue to work in that direction.

You could set a personal goal like "I'd like to eventually do xx percent of my travel by bicycle. I'd like to replace my two-car family to one or even my family would like to get rid of our car and travel by bus/bike/train...
+1

Especially ...

"the future will likely be so vastly different from what we imagine"

And ...

"You could set a personal goal like "I'd like to eventually do xx percent of my travel by bicycle. I'd like to replace my two-car family to one or even my family would like to get rid of our car and travel by bus/bike/train"
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Old 10-03-15, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by mozad655
Lets get some bike lanes first, then talk about quality. Some is always better than none at all.
I disagree. It's better to build high-quality, well-designed, connected lanes from the get-go. Cheap, poorly designed ones can be dangerous and are used by opponents of cycling infrastructure as examples of why no more should be built.
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Old 10-03-15, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve
The OP is concerned about Google and their driverless car. It's a gimmick they use to get the brand in the newspaper and helps keep the stock up. Folks, we are a hundred years or more away from the driverless car society.
I believe Google is a lot closer to this than you could imagine. But what strikes me as ironic is that Google pours so much brainpower into a transportation concept (basically cages...) that reinforces a rather stale mentality of keeping ourselves separate from those around us. Sad too because an independent observer would note that the driverless car is a rather convoluted take on a streetcar or bus. All you need to do is hook up those driverless cars bumper-to-bumper. Forget the artificial intelligence!
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Old 10-03-15, 10:26 PM
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Gerv, with a street car or a bus everyone needs to be going in the same direction at the same time. A driverless car can come get you and drop you off then pick someone else up or come back and get you when you want.

A bus or street car only goes to or comes from when they want.
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Old 10-04-15, 12:30 AM
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Holland has a GINI index in the mid 20's. The U.S. has a GINI index in the mid 40's. There is NEVER going to be any extensive separate but equal road system for bicycles in a country where only 1% of the population rides bicycles for transportation. NEVER. OK? NEVER. If an 8" wide white stripe isn't enough then... drive.

A huge irony is that Dutch cyclists would still be far safer than American cyclists even if there was not a single mile of protected bikeway in The Netherlands. It is NOT the separation that keeps bikes safe. Its the driving culture which stresses accountability and patience.
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