Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Living Car Free
Reload this Page >

The right tool for the job

Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

The right tool for the job

Old 11-22-15, 06:40 AM
  #26  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,646
Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 615 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by Roody View Post
…BTW, off-topic, I have often noticed your clever and helpful use of the forum's quote function. Along with your clear writing style, it makes your posts a delight to read.
Hi Roody,

Thanks for that nice comment. Even though off-topic, I’ll take this ball and run with it as my justification (”Apologia”).

Some time ago, I posted to this LCF thread,” What you got from BF transportation forums?”

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I have been an avid cyclist, as a lifestyle since about 1972; self-described year-round commuter, occasional centurian (in-training during the nice weather), and former cycle tourist, including a cross-country ride…I happened serendipitously on Bike Forums in 2008, and it was frankly incredible to find a community that shared so many concerns I had kept to myself as a lone cyclist [in an auotcentric culture].

This enthusiasm has definitely increased my enjoyment of cycling. As far as improving it, what I have gotten directly from BF are:
  • …the opportunity to post and literally "journal" my thoughts and activities about cycling and lifestyle (even if nobody else reads them), but which I wouldn't write down otherwise.
Posting has become an avocation for me. Since my job requires writing formal reports, with legal implications, I consider myself a “wordsmith,” and beside the exchange of information and ideas, I enjoy the mechanics of writing, such as grammar, composition , style, etc. for that addtional mental stimulation.

So with my experiences in cycling, and my frequent posting over the years, if I have replied on a recurrent topic, written to my satisfaction, I’ll just quote it. A further challenge then becomes finding the post.

Regards however to my specific style using the quote function, I have described it in previous Forum posts:

Originally Posted by yankeefan View Post
…Hey Jim, yeah I can never forget your trademark style of nested quotes.

Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
you have mad quotation skills…
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…Last year I came upon a post that to me embodied the communication style that I like about BF. In response to a long quote, turbo1889 wrote [not to me]:

Originally Posted by turbo1889 View Post
First of all you have no need to apologize for a lengthy post, least of all to me of all people. Part of the reason I like forums as apposed to other forms of written communal internet forms is because I consider it the "long deep conversation format" rather then the quick short snappy sound bite like format like twitter and such.
So when I nest quotes, I feel I’m emulating a conversation…”He said," then “You said," then “I said, and now I’m saying…” I leave my quotes as links to identify the author, and if anyone is interested in reading further, or verifying those quotes, they can easily be followed right from the post.

Instead of just snipping, or writing "<SNIP> or "[SKIP]," I use ellipses,"..." to eliminate as much as possible, and still leave the context of the quote comprehensible; and I bold key words and phrases to emphasize the core content of the discussion.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
While even if nobody reads my posts, I do try to communicate clearly to the reader. At least I try to evenly space, and keep my paragraphs short for easier readability, FWIW.
Nonetheless, some subscribers just don’t get it.

Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
... To be honest I have a hard time following what you are trying to say when you keep referring to snippets of your and others' previous posts from other threads in a very confusing manner. If you wish to repeat phrases or comments from previous posts, I would recommend just cut and paste the words and leave out the references to the other posts and context from other threads.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 11-22-15 at 06:46 AM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 09:28 AM
  #27  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,707

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Nonetheless, some subscribers just don’t get it.
I get "it", the right tool for the right job. Posting in a cascade of snippets of your own and others' previous posts, pulled out of context, makes you and your posting style unique, and as previously advised, often makes your point confusing, if not lost in the wordsmithing. Of course you are entitled to ignore and even mock honestly offered advice.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 12:20 PM
  #28  
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 12,800

Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3467 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Great concerns, so no concerns because I never lock it, nor even my beater bike. I keep my bike inside near my office or at home, I take it in with me when going to a store or indoors elsewhere, and I donít take the bike if Iím going anywhere I need to be away from it unobserved.

Thatís never been a problem when I ride, and doesnít inhibit my lifestyle.
No bikes allowed inside my office complex, so I have no choice but to lock outside at work. However like you I can walk to a lot of stuff I need from home or work, so work is the only place I often lock up.
cooker is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 12:28 PM
  #29  
loky1179
Senior Member
 
loky1179's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 960

Bikes: 2x Bianchi, 2x Specialized, 3x Schwinns

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by kickstart View Post
. . . .. as close to maintenance free as possible . . .. . .
Maintenance free is the key, and despite having 10+ bikes, it is the thing most likely to keep me from riding. Either due to lack of time or energy to work on repairs. Last week was the first week since March I didn't get at least one bike commute in. It rained all week, and both of my commuters with fenders were out of commission. Hope to get one of them back INTO commission today .
loky1179 is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 01:33 PM
  #30  
Ekdog
Senior Member
 
Ekdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seville, Spain
Posts: 4,405

Bikes: Brompton M6R, mountain bikes, Circe Omnis+ tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Posting has become an avocation for me.
Put me down as another admirer of both the content and the style of your posts.
Ekdog is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 04:35 PM
  #31  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 5,526

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1319 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by kickstart View Post

Being a heavy duty bike with IGH, chaincase, rollerbrakes, stainless wheels hardware and fittings, and marathon plus tires makes it as close to maintenance free as possible, basically all it needs other than maintaining tire pressure is an annual once over.
This is the reason why I use FG and SS bikes...I choose my bikes based on minimal maintenance and simplicity...Minimal maintenance and simplicity is a lot more important to me then bling, complexity or anything else...If I ever decide to use multi gears I will just build myself an IGH wheel and use it with one of my bikes which I already have. I hate derailleurs.

Last edited by wolfchild; 11-22-15 at 04:44 PM.
wolfchild is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 05:06 PM
  #32  
loky1179
Senior Member
 
loky1179's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 960

Bikes: 2x Bianchi, 2x Specialized, 3x Schwinns

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Here is my (sorry) attempt at nested quotes:

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
The right tool for the job


You might say I have the "right job (life) for the tool."

Originally Posted by loky1179 View Post
There are many posters who I strongly disagree with. I may think some of them are idiots, or worse. I don't engage them. I don't complain to the moderators. I skip on by their posts, and read the posts from (in my view) thoughtful and intelligent posters.
Plus One on liking Jim From Boston's posts. Count yourself in my list of
Originally Posted by loky1179 View Post
. . . thoughtful and intelligent posters.
loky1179 is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 05:14 PM
  #33  
Buffalo Buff
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: mars
Posts: 760

Bikes: 2015 synapse

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I chose living car free primarily for enjoyment, so I chose a bike I'd expect to get the most fun out of. That would be a fast road bike!



I had previously only owned mountain bikes and BMX bikes. I had tried out an early 80;s Fuji road bike with those shift levers near the stem, but I've never owned a road bike until I bought this Ridley.

Obviously it makes a great bike for pleasure rides and group rides. But I've adapted it towards commuter and touring use with great success. I try to carry the lightest load possible on any type of trip to maximize how enjoyable my ride is. I like how my bike handles when its naked or close to it.

I have a variety of frame mounted bags I use. I stick with an aero top tube bag for my commutes, carrying my keys/wallet/phone in there. I have a water bottle sized container I keep my repair kit in. I keep lights and a blutooth speaker on my frame. That's it for a commute.

For a tour, my setup will look something like this.

I'd have extra clothes (sleeping clothes, spare shorts/jersey) and my shelter in the saddle bag (Tent or hammock, sleeping bag, tarp, ropes, tent stakes etc.). The water bottle pod holds a repair kit and food. The frame bag holds food, a 20000mah battery to charge devices, and clothing accessories I'm likely to need while riding throughout the day (Headband, cold and warm weather gloves, safety glasses and sunglasses etc.) The top tube bag holds phone/$$/electrolyte gummies.

It's been a lot of fun adapting a bike meant for speed for more utilitarian uses. A lot of people scoff at the idea of commuting or touring on a bike like this, but it makes me happier at the end of a ride than using a more traditional commuter / tourer so its worth it to me.
Buffalo Buff is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 05:17 PM
  #34  
loky1179
Senior Member
 
loky1179's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 960

Bikes: 2x Bianchi, 2x Specialized, 3x Schwinns

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
This is the reason why I use FG and SS bikes...I choose my bikes based on minimal maintenance and simplicity...Minimal maintenance and simplicity is a lot more important to me then bling, complexity or anything else...If I ever decide to use multi gears I will just build myself an IGH wheel and use it with one of my bikes which I already have. I hate derailleurs.
Can I inquire what decade of life you are currently in??!! Whenever I contemplate a singlespeed, I just recall the range of gears I use everyday, and then think, "No, my knees wouldn't like that". Though the pull of minimal maintenance (combined with the ever present pull of N+1) is strong!

I am in my sixth decade .

Edit: Even though, in my Avatar photo, I am enjoying a ride on a singlespeed, propelled by my sister. But that was in my SECOND decade.
loky1179 is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 06:24 PM
  #35  
chewybrian 
"Florida Man"
 
chewybrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: East Florida
Posts: 1,652

Bikes: '16 Bob Jackson rando, '66 Raleigh Superbe, 80 Nishiki Maxima, 07 Gary Fisher Utopia, 09 Surly LHT

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 886 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Posting in a cascade of snippets of your own and others' previous posts, pulled out of context, makes you and your posting style unique, and as previously advised, often makes your point confusing, if not lost in the wordsmithing. Of course you are entitled to ignore and even mock honestly offered advice.


I use a Surly Long Haul Trucker. It has been fast enough for rando rides and centuries, but tough enough to haul heavy loads. I have over 50,000 miles on the beast.
__________________
Campione Del Mondo Immaginario
chewybrian is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 06:32 PM
  #36  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 5,526

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1319 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by loky1179 View Post
Can I inquire what decade of life you are currently in??!! Whenever I contemplate a singlespeed, I just recall the range of gears I use everyday, and then think, "No, my knees wouldn't like that". Though the pull of minimal maintenance (combined with the ever present pull of N+1) is strong!

I am in my sixth decade .

Edit: Even though, in my Avatar photo, I am enjoying a ride on a singlespeed, propelled by my sister. But that was in my SECOND decade.
Almost 46 years young and have been riding FG/SS for the past 8 years. I don't own any multi geared bikes...The secret to healthy knees is all about a proper gear ratio. Spin more and don't mash big gears...Mashing big gears will destroy knees.

Last edited by wolfchild; 11-22-15 at 06:37 PM.
wolfchild is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 06:37 PM
  #37  
chewybrian 
"Florida Man"
 
chewybrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: East Florida
Posts: 1,652

Bikes: '16 Bob Jackson rando, '66 Raleigh Superbe, 80 Nishiki Maxima, 07 Gary Fisher Utopia, 09 Surly LHT

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 886 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Almost 46 years young and have been riding FG/SS for the past 8 years. I don't own any multi geared bikes...The secret to healthy knees is all about a proper gear ratio. Spin more and don't mash big gears...Mashing big gears will destroy knees.
Don't you kinda get stuck mashing when you go uphill? I live in Florida, which is about as flat as it gets, and I still couldn't ride fixed gear unless it was just at the track. (same age group)
__________________
Campione Del Mondo Immaginario
chewybrian is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 06:42 PM
  #38  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 5,526

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1319 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by chewybrian View Post
Don't you kinda get stuck mashing when you go uphill? I live in Florida, which is about as flat as it gets, and I still couldn't ride fixed gear unless it was just at the track. (same age group)
I climb hills standing on the pedals...Standing on the pedals puts less stress on my knees then if I was sitting in the saddle...So far it has worked great for me, no issues with my knees.
wolfchild is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 06:58 PM
  #39  
chewybrian 
"Florida Man"
 
chewybrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: East Florida
Posts: 1,652

Bikes: '16 Bob Jackson rando, '66 Raleigh Superbe, 80 Nishiki Maxima, 07 Gary Fisher Utopia, 09 Surly LHT

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 886 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I climb hills standing on the pedals...Standing on the pedals puts less stress on my knees then if I was sitting in the saddle...So far it has worked great for me, no issues with my knees.
I can see where that might make the difference, but I don't think I'll be rushing out to buy my own fixie soon.
__________________
Campione Del Mondo Immaginario
chewybrian is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 07:20 PM
  #40  
Bandera 
~>~
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: TX Hill Country
Posts: 5,766
Mentioned: 85 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1025 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by chewybrian View Post
Don't you kinda get stuck mashing when you go uphill?
Having ridden FG on the road for >40 years the full range of cadence is called for when riding FG into/with the winds and up/down hill as one is wont to do.
It takes a supple cadence to move right smartly along on the less challenging routes and good technique and grunt on demand w/ power to get over the lumps and a supple spin to get down the backside.

This is not a recent revelation, serious club riders have been putting down long FG rides in challenging terrain for well over a century.

PS: Riding a Fixed Gear not for everyone.

-Bandera
__________________
'74 Raleigh Internat'l. '77 Trek TX900 FG. '90 Vitus 979. '10 Merckx EMX3. '13 Soma Stanyan

Last edited by Bandera; 11-22-15 at 07:24 PM.
Bandera is offline  
Old 11-22-15, 07:47 PM
  #41  
kickstart
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,422

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by loky1179 View Post
Maintenance free is the key, and despite having 10+ bikes, it is the thing most likely to keep me from riding. Either due to lack of time or energy to work on repairs. Last week was the first week since March I didn't get at least one bike commute in. It rained all week, and both of my commuters with fenders were out of commission. Hope to get one of them back INTO commission today .
Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
This is the reason why I use FG and SS bikes...I choose my bikes based on minimal maintenance and simplicity...Minimal maintenance and simplicity is a lot more important to me then bling, complexity or anything else...If I ever decide to use multi gears I will just build myself an IGH wheel and use it with one of my bikes which I already have. I hate derailleurs.
I've had my Gazelle 10 months, and have put 4200 miles on it so far. Except for a couple of adjustments to the brakes and shifter in the first few hundred miles, the only maintenance has been tire pressure. Many of those miles have been in the wet, and plenty of unpaved trails too.
Since I bring the bike in the house, not having the filth of rim brakes, and exposed chain keeps the SWMBO happy. I know many make light of it, but I hate chain maintenance, I'm very happy that its a once a year event with the Gazelle.
kickstart is offline  
Old 11-23-15, 08:13 AM
  #42  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,646
Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 615 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I’m perfectly fine with a high end carbon fiber bike for urban commuting/training and road cycling, and a mountain bike as a beater that can accept studded tires and a rack with a pannier for bad weather, utility riding, and off–road, if I were so-inclined (not particularly).

My N+1 would be a folding bike for traveling on vacations or business meetings...

Originally Posted by Buffalo Buff View Post
I chose living car free primarily for enjoyment, so I chose a bike I’d expect to get the most fun out of. That would be a fast road bike!...



Obviously it makes a great bike for pleasure rides and group rides. But I’ve adapted it towards commuter and touring use with great success. I try to carry the lightest load possible on any type of trip to maximize how enjoyable my ride is. I like how my bike handles when its naked or close to it.

I have a variety of frame mounted bags I use. I stick with an aero top tube bag for my commutes, carrying my keys/wallet/phone in there. I have a water bottle sized container I keep my repair kit in. I keep lights and a blutooth speaker on my frame. That’s it for a commute.

For a tour, my setup will look something like this….

It’s been a lot of fun adapting a bike meant for speed for more utilitarian uses. A lot of people scoff at the idea of commuting or touring on a bike like this, but it makes me happier at the end of a ride than using a more traditional commuter / tourer so its worth it to me.
I totally subscribe to that attitude of commuting with my best, carbon fiber bike. It’s a real joy to ride, and is an extra motivation to get me out on the road. Of course the real detriment is the lack of carrying capacity, and I’m impressed with your ability to tour. Back in 1977 my wife and I rode cross-country on then seemingly high-level steel French road bikes, Merciers with sew-up tires, but fully loaded, with panniers, and even carried a gallon of water in the desert. Flat tires were our greatest problem. If I/we were to tour again, it would likely be with a credit card.

My solution to increase my carrying capacity was to recently buy an elongated, roll-up type seat bag made by Green Guru as pictured below. For my commute, I still wear a lightweight backpack to carry lightweight, voluminous items, like a fleece, or extra pair of tights.



Originally Posted by loky1179 View Post
Maintenance free is the key, and despite having 10+ bikes, it is the thing most likely to keep me from riding. Either due to lack of time or energy to work on repairs…
I posted to this thread on the Road Cycling Forum, ”Do You Work / Maintain Your Own Bikes?”

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…Besides time, I have never had good facilities to work easily. Even now we live in a relatively small, but elegant condo, and my wife would frown on a room with a bike stand. Having the LBS do it all, in my case is a really good deal. The shop is one block away, and they will fix many things at a convenient time for me. They are so expert that they can do these things quickly, better than me, and often spot problems that I did not see. Whenever I leave the shop, the bikes ride as if new again.

Because the bikes are a major transportation mode for me, keeping them in good repair is critical. We save a lot of money on transportation, so further using the LBS is even more cost-effective. I tip well, not, "To Insure Prompt Service," but because I am so appreciative of their work. Hats off to Back Bay Bikes.
In 2013 was the first winter with the CF bike, and over the past two winters, that bike essentially is not ridden from January through March, and I ride the heavy-duty beater bike with studded tires. Last year, I thought about a second lesser quality road bike to ride on dry, but salted roads. My wife nixed the idea of three bikes in the condo. (I note that @Buffalo Buff posts from Mars, so I presume he doesn’t have to worry about wet roads, though maybe sandstorms).

This weekend, I was in bike shop to get some minor work done (gratis) and I started to look at second tier road bikes. My trusted mechanic suggested an aluminum BMC costing about $1500, with upgraded components and 25 C tires. That would then become a year-round beater/rain bike, and the mountain bike would become the most severe winter ride. I think if I promised to store the carbon fiber bike away during the winter, and mountain bike during the nice weather, my wife might allow that.

This morning though as I rode the CF at 39įF, I could be confident that the sheen on the road was wet, and not black ice. I was reminded about the post by @ tsl Rochester New York, which convinced me to get studded tires in the first place,

Originally Posted by tsl View Post
I dunno, maybe it's my age showing. Here in Rochester, at least along my commute, there's always ice that miraculously didn't get salted away.

I figure gunk washes off quickly and easily. Broken bones would keep me off the bike for weeks while they mend.
I’ll have to keep that in mind to ride a road bike with unstudded tires during the winter.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
DSCN1014.jpg (92.7 KB, 95 views)
File Type: jpg
051.jpg (87.9 KB, 94 views)

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 11-23-15 at 08:50 AM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 11-23-15, 11:23 AM
  #43  
mconlonx 
Str*t*gic *quivoc*tor
 
mconlonx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 7,563
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6921 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 20 Posts
I built this as my ultimate commuter:



Which would be bike of choice if I ever went car-free. However, I'd probably add a rear rack/panniers and have a BOB trailer kicking around as well. And a spare bike or two. Or three.

Currently, it's set up with STI shifting, a 10sp 11-36/48 x 34 drivetrain, fenders, dyno-hub/lighting. Drivetrain is perfect for my current terrain, but I'd consider a different drivetrain setup if I ever moved somewhere it might be more appropriate. It's got horizontal dropouts at the rear, so it could accommodate SS/FG/IGH if that's how I wanted to roll.

If I was starting from scratch, I'd probably get a Surly Troll frame and go from there.
__________________
I know next to nothing. I am frequently wrong.
mconlonx is offline  
Old 11-23-15, 12:07 PM
  #44  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,864
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
If i could have just one bike (I have 12 now) it'd be a rigid frame/front fork drop bar MTB. It's fast with narrow slicks, can be used for touring and can mount wide knobby tires for winter snow. It can be adapted to a single speed too. For me it'd be the most versatile.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 11-24-15, 03:08 PM
  #45  
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 12,800

Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3467 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by kickstart View Post
What kind of bike do you find most conducive to being car free/light?
In a way, there is no one "job" of being car-free, so perhaps there is no one tool. Commuting, shopping, pleasure riding, bike touring and non-bicycle travelling, all require slightly different bike specs. That's why a lot of car-free people and commuters don't limit themselves to one bike.

Last edited by cooker; 11-24-15 at 03:28 PM.
cooker is offline  
Old 11-24-15, 03:11 PM
  #46  
Walter S
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Atlanta, GA. USA
Posts: 3,830

Bikes: Surly Long Haul Disc Trucker

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
In a way, there is no one "job" of being car-free, so perhaps there is no one tool. Commuting, shipping, pleasure riding, bike touring and non-bicycle travelling, all require slightly different bike specs. That's why a lot of car-free people and commuters don't limit themselves to one bike.
The rest of us use one anyway because it's simpler and cheaper.
Walter S is offline  
Old 11-24-15, 03:27 PM
  #47  
kickstart
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,422

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
In a way, there is no one "job" of being car-free, so perhaps there is no one tool. Commuting, shipping, pleasure riding, bike touring and non-bicycle travelling, all require slightly different bike specs. That's why a lot of car-free people and commuters don't limit themselves to one bike.
Maybe, maybe not.
As a cycling enthusiast its likely one would desire more than one kind of bike, but perhaps not from a strictly utilitarian point of view.
I have 7 bikes, but could cover all my needs and desires with just one.
kickstart is offline  
Old 11-24-15, 03:29 PM
  #48  
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 12,800

Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3467 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Walter S View Post
The rest of us use one anyway because it's simpler and cheaper.
What about a backup bike? I'd at least want that.
cooker is offline  
Old 11-24-15, 03:34 PM
  #49  
Walter S
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Atlanta, GA. USA
Posts: 3,830

Bikes: Surly Long Haul Disc Trucker

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1014 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
What about a backup bike? I'd at least want that.
I've ridden most of my life. Never needed one. I could use mass transit if necessary.
Walter S is offline  
Old 11-24-15, 04:13 PM
  #50  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 5,526

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1319 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by Walter S View Post
I've ridden most of my life. Never needed one. I could use mass transit if necessary.
I also have good public transit and some places are within walking distance but I still choose to have 3 bikes because I prefer to get around on a bike. It's not just for back up, it's also for variety, I like how each bike handles a little differently.
wolfchild is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.