Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Living Car Free
Reload this Page >

Travelling, Holidays, Vacations -- Car Light or Car Free

Notices
Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

Travelling, Holidays, Vacations -- Car Light or Car Free

Old 02-17-16, 08:55 AM
  #26  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by PedalingWalrus View Post
Last summer went to San Miguel Island in the Azores. Got off the airplane in Ponta Delgada, walked to the downtown and rented 2 road bikes at a reputable bike shop (Specialized Allez). Loaded up the bikes and biked 10 miles to the rental apartment in nearby town. Spent the vacation between biking and perusing local buses. Saw the entire island. If you love hills, you will love biking on San Miguel :-) I did not count on that. It built character and in the end it was totally awesome.

We live close to the ocean. 2 years ago we mapped out all the islands that could be biked for reasonable mileage. We ended up planning weekends to take the ferry to an island and circumnavigating it, sometimes choosing to spending the night. Good Time.
Wonderful!!

We're also near the ocean, and a few weekends ago, I did a day trip where cycled to a ferry that took me to one of the local islands and I cycled there for the day.

We're talking about exploring a different island by bicycle one weekend soon.
Machka is offline  
Old 02-17-16, 04:06 PM
  #27  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,494

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 436 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5639 Post(s)
Liked 220 Times in 159 Posts
I'm thinking of easing back into bike touring with my wife. She doesn't have a lot of stamina on a bike. The most I've ever seen her ride is 30-odd miles in a day. I'm thinking in the next month or so, we'll ride to a B&B 8 miles from our house. Maybe by the end of the summer she'll feel good about doing bigger distances. Being in a B&B in nice scenery and away from our daily concerns might feel like a pleasant break, and getting there by bike will be fun.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 02:11 AM
  #28  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I'm thinking of easing back into bike touring with my wife. She doesn't have a lot of stamina on a bike. The most I've ever seen her ride is 30-odd miles in a day. I'm thinking in the next month or so, we'll ride to a B&B 8 miles from our house. Maybe by the end of the summer she'll feel good about doing bigger distances. Being in a B&B in nice scenery and away from our daily concerns might feel like a pleasant break, and getting there by bike will be fun.
That sounds like a wonderful plan, even if it doesn't lead to more and longer rides for the two of you.

Lucky me, my spouse loves to ride. Maybe a tandem is in your future.
B. Carfree is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 02:03 PM
  #29  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,494

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 436 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5639 Post(s)
Liked 220 Times in 159 Posts
Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
That sounds like a wonderful plan, even if it doesn't lead to more and longer rides for the two of you.

Lucky me, my spouse loves to ride. Maybe a tandem is in your future.
We have a tandem but I haven't finished making it fit us. On our quickie test ride, she found it very uncomfortable. Fit was probably one problem, but the whippiness was very unnerving to her.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 02-25-16, 08:04 AM
  #30  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Lots more photos ... including some of the rail trail I mentioned earlier ...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...12198466/page6





Machka is offline  
Old 02-25-16, 08:07 AM
  #31  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
However, we ended up spending a bit of time there because Rowan flatted again, and this time it was because of the size of that tube, we suspect. He patched it, but because we didn't feel entirely comfortable with how well it was going to hold up, plus because time was getting on, we decided to return to Warrnambool via the Hopkins Training Route ... a cycling route so popular it is actually signed. I'll post a photo of the sign soon.


Machka is offline  
Old 02-28-16, 07:54 PM
  #32  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
February 27/28

I really didn't know what to expect.

The websites about Maria Island don't provide much in the way of photographs and even the online cycling map isn't very detailed ( http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/indeX.aspX?base=7592 ).

However, I did know a few things:
-- Maria is pronounced like the singer some of you might remember, Mariah Carey.

-- Maria Island has one pay campground with an amenities block near where the ferry docks, and two free campgrounds elsewhere on the island. It also has converted the old Penitentiary (we are in Tasmania here, old penitentiaries are plentiful) into accommodations which turned out to be full this weekend ... so therefore we were camping. But that was an excellent option.

-- Maria Island does not have a shop or cafe of any sort on the island, so we had to bring everything we wanted with us.

-- Maria Island has a pack out policy, so we had to carry all our rubbish off the island with us.

-- Maria Island is a National Park and requires a park pass.

-- Maria Island's most popular feature is the Painted Cliffs. Type: 'Maria Island Painted Cliffs' into Google, and you'll see what I mean. There are heaps of photos.

-- Maria Island does not allow motor vehicles. There are a few motor vehicles on the island (we saw a tractor and a couple utes) belonging to the Parks and Wildlife Service for their use, but that is it. People get around the island by walking or cycling.

So I didn't expect:
-- the size of the mountain on the north island. Somehow I had imagined the island to be flatter than that. I should have know, we are in Tasmania here! It was spectacular!

-- the views. Being as I had imagined more flatness, I didn't imagine the mountain scenery, the cliffs, the roaring waves ...

-- the wildlife. Somehow I not only imagined a relatively flat island, I also imagined one devoid of wildlife. But if you want to go somewhere in Tasmania and see wildlife, overnight on Maria Island! In the evening, our tent was surrounded by pademelons, wallabies, a wombat, possums (who attempted an exploration of my panniers in the middle of the night ... but I thwarted them), green parrots, Cape Barren geese and Tasmanian native hens. I'm pretty sure we also caught a glimpse of a Tasmanian devil in the camp kitchen. I've never seen so many different Australian animals all in one place.

-- the roads. I knew they'd be gravel, but somehow I didn't expect them to be quite so heavy going. However, the east coast of Tasmania has had a lot of rain recently, so we suspect there has been some washing away, and perhaps they aren't quite as good as usual. I imagined we would cycle the whole island with no difficulty at all on Sunday. It's about 20 km down to the south end, so a 40 km round trip. Plus maybe a side trip or two to add up to about 50 km. Even going slowish and stopping to take photos, I figured 4 hours tops.

There are two times available to go across to Maria Island on the ferry, 9 am (and I knew we weren't going to make that) and 3:30 pm (so I booked that one ... 2 adults, 2 bicycles). Passengers are, of course, walk-on only because there are no motor vehicles allowed. However, we are allowed to bring bicycles or rent bicycles. They have a fleet of black step-through bicycles available for rent ($25/day), but we opted to bring our Bike Fridays complete with new knobby tires which Rowan installed last week.
Bike Maria | Maria Island Ferry

We loaded up and made the crossing with about 15 other people on a bright, sunny and warm day. The crossing is about 30 minutes ... a little wavy (ginger is a good thing), but also scenic, as there is a good view of the island on the way over. When we arrived, we reattached our panniers etc., while some of the hikers made use of large wagons lined up at the dock to transport their things approx. half a km to the penitentiary or campground. Visitors to the island need to be reasonably fit since they do not have access to motor vehicles.

After checking in at the Visitor's Information centre located in one of the few remaining historic buildings on the island, we cycled to the campground and set up. Then we cycled up and over the hill to the Painted Cliffs. They are beautiful! As I mentioned before, Google Maria Island Painted Cliffs and you'll see. Next time we go, I would like to explore them more.

The Painted Cliffs aren't very far but the ride took us a lot longer than we thought, so we began reconsidering the idea of cycling to the far south of the island. However, the knobby tires Rowan installed onto our Bike Fridays were quite appropriate for the conditions. I just need to become a bit more confident with mountain biking skills.

When we got back, as mentioned above, our tent was surrounded by wildlife! Yes, of course I took photos!!

That night we went to sleep to the roar and crash of the waves at the nearby beach. Besides the sounds of the ocean and rustles of the wild life, it was very quiet. No traffic noise. No hum of appliances. It was also very dark in the campground because the camp kitchen and amenities block do not have lights, nor are there lights throughout the campground ... no electricity. Without the usual light pollution, the stars looked bright and huge.

We had a lazy morning, and then decided to do a hiking/cycling loop around the north end of the island instead of the southern trek. I am glad we made that decision ... I loved it up there. Mountain views, huge waves, and a certain remoteness and barrenness, I felt very comfortable and at home with.

We had a bit of time to spare before the return ferry, and the weather had set in (windy chilly drizzle), so we had lunch and then explored some of the other buildings ... the museum, and a few of the others.

And then we were homeward-bound on the ferry again.


We'd like to go back and spend longer there. I went over wondering what on earth people would do over there with more than one day, and came back realising that the number of hikes and rides a person could do might take a week. Plus it was nice to get away ... no phone, no computer, no traffic, very few people ... just nature.
Machka is offline  
Old 02-28-16, 11:03 PM
  #33  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
That just may be my new favorite sign.

Now how do we get that into the US Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices?
B. Carfree is offline  
Old 02-29-16, 07:48 AM
  #34  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
That just may be my new favorite sign.

Now how do we get that into the US Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices?
I do think there should be more named cycling routes like that.
Machka is offline  
Old 02-29-16, 07:49 AM
  #35  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Photos from our Maria Island weekend away ...


Getting ready to go ...






Maria Island ... not as flat as expected!!



Machka is offline  
Old 03-01-16, 12:38 AM
  #36  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'm so old-fashioned. I just can't seem to get used to the droopy-drawer look of panniers on a Bike Friday. I'm finally used to 'bents, but I guess it will be a while until the small wheel bikes grow on me.
B. Carfree is offline  
Old 03-01-16, 06:28 AM
  #37  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
I was sceptical about folding bikes at first, but discovered that the handling, comfort, and speed are comparable to full-sized bicycles ... but folding bikes can be so much more convenient.

This was the first time we had ridden ours with panniers. We have done a lot of other riding with handlebar bag and Carradice, but not with the panniers. I wasn't sure how they'd be with the extra weight, but they were really good. It just took a moment or two to get used to the slightly different handling, and then we were off!

Funny thing ... after having done a couple rides with them on the island on the gravel roads and up and over the paddocks, we were sitting having lunch when a group of 4 day riders came into the camp kitchen and spotted our bicycles. First thing out of their mouths was, "The potholes around here would swallow those wheels whole! Those wheels are too small to ride around here!"
Well ... um ... we just did ... and the wheels were fine. They are, of course, BMX size and BMX courses aren't known for their flat smoothness.

Anyway, I think they look kinda cute with the panniers on.
Machka is offline  
Old 03-02-16, 01:07 AM
  #38  
TuckertonRR
Senior Member
 
TuckertonRR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Philadelphia PA
Posts: 572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wow, I love those pics! Especially the ones near the beach! It's almost like the New Jersey shore that I'm used to. I've never drove/rode on left - hand lanes (UK, Aus, etc) do you ride your bike to the extreme left, or closer to the median? And are general "bike rules" similar to those in the States, ?? I'm considering a trip to Ireland in the next year or so, and never actually rode in a left-drive country (though I've been to the UK twice before - just walked & used the transport systems).
TuckertonRR is offline  
Old 03-02-16, 01:45 AM
  #39  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by TuckertonRR View Post
Wow, I love those pics! Especially the ones near the beach! It's almost like the New Jersey shore that I'm used to. I've never drove/rode on left - hand lanes (UK, Aus, etc) do you ride your bike to the extreme left, or closer to the median? And are general "bike rules" similar to those in the States, ?? I'm considering a trip to Ireland in the next year or so, and never actually rode in a left-drive country (though I've been to the UK twice before - just walked & used the transport systems).
This is a photo of Rowan riding ahead of me on the overnight tour we did at the end of November ... that's where we ride ... near the white line on the edge of the road.

And yes, the rules of the road in Australia and the UK are quite similar to those in Canada and the US. The usual stuff ... signal, stop at stop signs, etc.

It's quite easy to ride (or drive) on the left side of the road EXCEPT when it comes to turning at intersections. That's when you've got to really pay attention and turn into the correct lane. It's actually easier when riding a bicycle than driving because if you get it wrong, you can just pull over and correct the situation when it is safe to do so.

Oh, one other thing ... there are lots and lots and lots of roundabouts in Australia and the UK. And they go in the opposite direction to any you might have encountered in the US.

Machka is offline  
Old 03-03-16, 07:33 AM
  #40  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
-- the wildlife. Somehow I not only imagined a relatively flat island, I also imagined one devoid of wildlife. But if you want to go somewhere in Tasmania and see wildlife, overnight on Maria Island! In the evening, our tent was surrounded by pademelons, wallabies, a wombat, possums (who attempted an exploration of my panniers in the middle of the night ... but I thwarted them), green parrots, Cape Barren geese and Tasmanian native hens. I'm pretty sure we also caught a glimpse of a Tasmanian devil in the camp kitchen. I've never seen so many different Australian animals all in one place.


Machka is offline  
Old 03-03-16, 01:10 PM
  #41  
Walter S
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Atlanta, GA. USA
Posts: 3,808

Bikes: Surly Long Haul Disc Trucker

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1015 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Pretty pictures
Walter S is offline  
Old 03-20-16, 05:37 AM
  #42  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
I really didn't know what to expect.

The websites about Maria Island don't provide much in the way of photographs and even the online cycling map isn't very detailed ( Parks & Wildlife Service - Maria Island by Bike ).

However, I did know a few things:
-- Maria is pronounced like the singer some of you might remember, Mariah Carey.

-- Maria Island has one pay campground with an amenities block near where the ferry docks, and two free campgrounds elsewhere on the island. It also has converted the old Penitentiary (we are in Tasmania here, old penitentiaries are plentiful) into accommodations which turned out to be full this weekend ... so therefore we were camping. But that was an excellent option.

-- Maria Island does not have a shop or cafe of any sort on the island, so we had to bring everything we wanted with us.

-- Maria Island has a pack out policy, so we had to carry all our rubbish off the island with us.

-- Maria Island is a National Park and requires a park pass.

-- Maria Island's most popular feature is the Painted Cliffs. Type: 'Maria Island Painted Cliffs' into Google, and you'll see what I mean. There are heaps of photos.

-- Maria Island does not allow motor vehicles. There are a few motor vehicles on the island (we saw a tractor and a couple utes) belonging to the Parks and Wildlife Service for their use, but that is it. People get around the island by walking or cycling.

So I didn't expect:
-- the size of the mountain on the north island. Somehow I had imagined the island to be flatter than that. I should have know, we are in Tasmania here! It was spectacular!

-- the views. Being as I had imagined more flatness, I didn't imagine the mountain scenery, the cliffs, the roaring waves ...

-- the wildlife. Somehow I not only imagined a relatively flat island, I also imagined one devoid of wildlife. But if you want to go somewhere in Tasmania and see wildlife, overnight on Maria Island! In the evening, our tent was surrounded by pademelons, wallabies, a wombat, possums (who attempted an exploration of my panniers in the middle of the night ... but I thwarted them), green parrots, Cape Barren geese and Tasmanian native hens. I'm pretty sure we also caught a glimpse of a Tasmanian devil in the camp kitchen. I've never seen so many different Australian animals all in one place.

-- the roads. I knew they'd be gravel, but somehow I didn't expect them to be quite so heavy going. However, the east coast of Tasmania has had a lot of rain recently, so we suspect there has been some washing away, and perhaps they aren't quite as good as usual. I imagined we would cycle the whole island with no difficulty at all on Sunday. It's about 20 km down to the south end, so a 40 km round trip. Plus maybe a side trip or two to add up to about 50 km. Even going slowish and stopping to take photos, I figured 4 hours tops.

There are two times available to go across to Maria Island on the ferry, 9 am (and I knew we weren't going to make that) and 3:30 pm (so I booked that one ... 2 adults, 2 bicycles). Passengers are, of course, walk-on only because there are no motor vehicles allowed. However, we are allowed to bring bicycles or rent bicycles. They have a fleet of black step-through bicycles available for rent ($25/day), but we opted to bring our Bike Fridays complete with new knobby tires which Rowan installed last week.
Bike Maria | Maria Island Ferry

We loaded up and made the crossing with about 15 other people on a bright, sunny and warm day. The crossing is about 30 minutes ... a little wavy (ginger is a good thing), but also scenic, as there is a good view of the island on the way over. When we arrived, we reattached our panniers etc., while some of the hikers made use of large wagons lined up at the dock to transport their things approx. half a km to the penitentiary or campground. Visitors to the island need to be reasonably fit since they do not have access to motor vehicles.

After checking in at the Visitor's Information centre located in one of the few remaining historic buildings on the island, we cycled to the campground and set up. Then we cycled up and over the hill to the Painted Cliffs. They are beautiful! As I mentioned before, Google Maria Island Painted Cliffs and you'll see. Next time we go, I would like to explore them more.

The Painted Cliffs aren't very far but the ride took us a lot longer than we thought, so we began reconsidering the idea of cycling to the far south of the island. However, the knobby tires Rowan installed onto our Bike Fridays were quite appropriate for the conditions. I just need to become a bit more confident with mountain biking skills.

When we got back, as mentioned above, our tent was surrounded by wildlife! Yes, of course I took photos!!

That night we went to sleep to the roar and crash of the waves at the nearby beach. Besides the sounds of the ocean and rustles of the wild life, it was very quiet. No traffic noise. No hum of appliances. It was also very dark in the campground because the camp kitchen and amenities block do not have lights, nor are there lights throughout the campground ... no electricity. Without the usual light pollution, the stars looked bright and huge.

We had a lazy morning, and then decided to do a hiking/cycling loop around the north end of the island instead of the southern trek. I am glad we made that decision ... I loved it up there. Mountain views, huge waves, and a certain remoteness and barrenness, I felt very comfortable and at home with.

We had a bit of time to spare before the return ferry, and the weather had set in (windy chilly drizzle), so we had lunch and then explored some of the other buildings ... the museum, and a few of the others.

And then we were homeward-bound on the ferry again.


We'd like to go back and spend longer there. I went over wondering what on earth people would do over there with more than one day, and came back realising that the number of hikes and rides a person could do might take a week. Plus it was nice to get away ... no phone, no computer, no traffic, very few people ... just nature.


I finished posting the Maria Island photos here ...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...54742114/page4

and ...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...54742114/page5


There's an amazing feel about the place ... almost like you've got this whole island to yourself. There are other people there, of course, but not many and we're all scattered around just taking it all in.
Machka is offline  
Old 04-01-16, 06:51 AM
  #43  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Just got back from a 10-day trip to Queensland.

We flew there and back.
We made use of 4 taxis.
A friend drove us back to our cabin after the 300 km randonnee we completed.
We took the bus.
We cruised on a couple catamarans.
We swam in the ocean or the caravan park pool on several days.
We kayaked 3.6 km.
We walked 23.4 km.
We walked 23.4 km.
We cycled 443.93 km.


Because we stayed in one place the whole time, it was a hub-and-spoke style tour with a bit of randonneuring thrown in for good measure.

We were fortunate to be staying in a place which was within walking distance of all the amenities we needed. There was a shopping centre less than 1 km away in one direction where we were able to get supplies and find dinner. And there was a small mall about 1.3 km in the other direction with a really good Thai restaurant.

On one day, we took a trip into Brisbane ... walked to the bus, bused into the city and out again later, and spent several hours walking around the city, plus a trip on the CityCat. The CityCat is a great method of public transportation up and down the Brisbane River. With space for bicycles! We, and other tourists, just rode it to see a bit of the city from a different perspective, but lots of others use it for transportational purposes.
I'd like to see Hobart adopt something like that.
CityCat and ferry services | Brisbane City Council

On another day we took a trip out to Morton Island. That involved taxis, a shuttle bus, and catamarans. And then we spent several hours walking around the island, going sea kayaking and swimming. Imagine palm trees, white sand, clear blue water ...

The big event of the weekend was, of course, the reason we went to Queensland ... the 300K randonnee. A fast "tour" of the area north of Brisbane.
http://www.bikeforums.net/long-dista...l#post18639634


And then the rest of the time was spent cycling here and there exploring the area. The quantity and quality of cycling amenities in that part of the world were amazing! The Morton Bay Cycleway is about 150 km of beautiful wide paved cycling trails, bicycle lanes, etc. It was so nice to be able to head out the door and just ride wherever we wanted with minimal effort.
https://briscycle.com/moreton-bay-cycleway/


I've started posting photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...57665424280966 ... starting with 24Mar16_Queensland ...

Last edited by Machka; 04-01-16 at 06:56 AM.
Machka is offline  
Old 04-05-16, 07:41 PM
  #44  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
I've started posting photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...57665424280966 ... starting with 24Mar16_Queensland ...




Machka is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 09:32 AM
  #45  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Did anyone else go on holiday without your cars over Easter?
Machka is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 10:40 AM
  #46  
Rob_E
Senior Member
 
Rob_E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,626

Bikes: Downtube 8H, Surly Troll

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Did anyone else go on holiday without your cars over Easter?
I was without a car, I think, but I didn't go anywhere. Love those photos, though. Makes me yearn for a trip outside of my normal stomping grounds. I sometimes forget that there's parts of the world that have no resemblance to the eastern United States.

I do have plans. Four day music festival coming up, and getting there is half the fun. Well, maybe not half.

It's only 40 or 50 miles or so away, but I've found that the earlier I get there, the better my camping spot, so I've gotten into the habit of taking the bus as close as I can (about halfway) so that I can get camp set up. This year I might just bike the first half the night before and get one more day of camping in. Then a long weekend of music. Then a leisurely ride back home (or half of a leisurely ride home plus a bus ride, depending on the weather).

-------------------------

Then a few weeks later I get to finally put my S & S coupler bike to the test by flying with it in to central Ohio, biking the north east half of the Ohio-to-Erie trail up to Cleveland, take the train to Pittsburgh, ride the Great Allegheny Passage + the C & O Towpath Trail to Washington DC, and take the train home. Almost two weeks. Almost no cars. And about 50% self-propelled. Here's hoping.
Rob_E is offline  
Old 04-08-16, 06:31 PM
  #47  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Rob_E View Post
I was without a car, I think, but I didn't go anywhere. Love those photos, though. Makes me yearn for a trip outside of my normal stomping grounds. I sometimes forget that there's parts of the world that have no resemblance to the eastern United States.

I do have plans. Four day music festival coming up, and getting there is half the fun. Well, maybe not half.

It's only 40 or 50 miles or so away, but I've found that the earlier I get there, the better my camping spot, so I've gotten into the habit of taking the bus as close as I can (about halfway) so that I can get camp set up. This year I might just bike the first half the night before and get one more day of camping in. Then a long weekend of music. Then a leisurely ride back home (or half of a leisurely ride home plus a bus ride, depending on the weather).

-------------------------

Then a few weeks later I get to finally put my S & S coupler bike to the test by flying with it in to central Ohio, biking the north east half of the Ohio-to-Erie trail up to Cleveland, take the train to Pittsburgh, ride the Great Allegheny Passage + the C & O Towpath Trail to Washington DC, and take the train home. Almost two weeks. Almost no cars. And about 50% self-propelled. Here's hoping.

Nice!

You'll have to post photos when you return from those. Your part of the world is pretty scenic too.
Machka is offline  
Old 04-17-16, 04:42 AM
  #48  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
I've started posting photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...57665424280966 ... starting with 24Mar16_Queensland ...
I've put more of the photos of our car-free Easter getaway here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...57667066681612








Machka is offline  
Old 04-26-16, 05:58 PM
  #49  
Machka 
In Real Life
Thread Starter
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,531

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2936 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 83 Posts
Another short car-light tour ... lots of cycling ...

http://www.bikeforums.net/touring/10...l#post18719220
Machka is offline  
Old 04-28-16, 09:03 AM
  #50  
tandempower
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 4,353
Mentioned: 90 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8075 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post

Nothing like wall-free dining to complement the car-free experience
tandempower is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.