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Travelling, Holidays, Vacations -- Car Light or Car Free

Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

Travelling, Holidays, Vacations -- Car Light or Car Free

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Old 10-20-17, 01:48 PM
  #76  
Walter S
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Originally Posted by elocs View Post
I've been car-free since I retired 4 years ago. I reject the tired old cliché that you're supposed to want to travel when you retire. Whenever I get to where I have traveled I wish I was home. There's no place I want to go and there's no place I need to travel to for holidays or any other time, so I don't. Retirement is great. I prefer my life to remain simple and traveling is stress and aggravation I don't need.
It’s amazing how many people don’t intimately know the area within 10 miles of home.
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Old 10-20-17, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Walter S View Post
It’s amazing how many people don’t intimately know the area within 10 miles of home.
I've lived here for 60 years now and I guarantee that I intimately know the area within 10 miles of my home.
But if I didn't, so what? I'm just content to stay right where I'm at.
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Old 10-21-17, 12:37 AM
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Originally Posted by cooker View Post
Some shots of Christiania, Denmark (including one with the eponymous bike) which I biked through with the bro and neph
Thanks for posting these. To me, Christiana actually looks charming, if run-down in some ways. Would you like to spend more time there?

This is my type of vacation--on a bike and off the beaten path. Years ago, on a long cross-country vacation, I spent a few nights at a commune in Eugene Oregon. One night they had a dinner party in our honor with at least 50 people in attendance. They asked everybody for a 50 cent donation. The cook said that's about the actual cost for the huge meal, as many of the ingredients came from dumpsters at organic food stores. It was delicious!
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Old 10-21-17, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Roody View Post
Thanks for posting these. To me, Christiana actually looks charming, if run-down in some ways. Would you like to spend more time there?

This is my type of vacation--on a bike and off the beaten path. Years ago, on a long cross-country vacation, I spent a few nights at a commune in Eugene Oregon. One night they had a dinner party in our honor with at least 50 people in attendance. They asked everybody for a 50 cent donation. The cook said that's about the actual cost for the huge meal, as many of the ingredients came from dumpsters at organic food stores. It was delicious!
I'm afraid I'm too used to my conventional lifestyle to see Christiania as more than an interesting place to visit on a day trip. Still, I really enjoyed the larger Copenhagen experience. We biked around town with my nephew one day, mainly to see Christiania, did a walking tour one day with my niece, who is a professional tour guide there focusing on food and beer, and biked around town another day with my 57 year old sister, who showed us more mainstream tourism sites like historic palaces and fortifications, the mermaid statue, and an art museum focusing on 19th and early 20th century Danish painters (the Skagen group especially). My bro and I also walked and biked a fair amount ourselves. Our last day was car-heavy, as we drove to see castles at Frederiksborg, Helsingør (Hamlet's Elsinore) and another one, and the Louisiana (really) Museum of Modern Art that had a fascinating Marina Abramovic show. All of those last ones could be seen easily by bike or train/bus, but not in one day.

Last edited by cooker; 10-21-17 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 02-15-18, 01:42 AM
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Are you going anywhere this year ... car light or car free?

Backpacking around Europe maybe?

Cycling across Canada?

Taking the train to the next state and cycling their rail trails?


.
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Old 02-15-18, 08:21 AM
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What's a vacation?

This year my big plan is to take two days off form one department so I can work for a different department of the same company. I will need to use the car---too far to bike in the time available and too much gear to carry. It will be the second time I have used it in the past year .... I will enjoy it.

I'd rather be riding .... But I have lost so much fitness since I changed my schedule --- i was thinking of taking time to go mountain biking, but i doubt i could last an hour .... not much of a "Mountain Biking Weekend" if i spend more time driving to the trail than riding.

Also ... my wife doesn't ride and doesn't want to.

Pretty soon i will figure out how to make this work ... in the meantime I will continue to be insanely jealous of Rowan and yourself.

Rage---it's what's for dinner.
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Old 02-15-18, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Are you going anywhere this year ... car light or car free?

Backpacking around Europe maybe?

Cycling across Canada?

Taking the train to the next state and cycling their rail trails?


.
For the past several years I have been biking, sometimes with the help of a bus, to a music festival that takes place about 50 miles away. I often try and cheat(with the bus) on the way there, so I can get there early in the day for the best choice of camping spots. I also experiment with different routes to keep the scenery interesting. This year I am considering taking the train to a nearby town so that I can approach the festival from an entirely new direction.

Every year I try to camp with friends in central Ohio in late May. For years I drove up from North Carolina, 500 miles, but now I have no car, so I've been trying different options. This year I will likely fly into Cleveland with my bike, bike around northeast Ohio for a few days visiting friends and family, and then bike to camp. At the end of the weekend, I will bike 60 miles to Columbus and fly home. Last year was similar except I biked from Cleveland to camp, then from camp to Pittsburgh, where I caught the Great Allegheny Passage down to Cumberland, Maryland, where I caught a train home. I hope to do something similar in the future, but this year I don't have time for 400+ mile trip that I did last time.

After riding the GAP last year, I decided it was easy enough riding that my wife, who only bike occasionally, could handle it. So we, along with my aunt and uncle, rode the trail in the fall as a credit card tour. I'm hoping to find a similar ride to do this year.
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Old 02-24-18, 05:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Rob_E View Post
For the past several years I have been biking, sometimes with the help of a bus, to a music festival that takes place about 50 miles away. I often try and cheat(with the bus) on the way there, so I can get there early in the day for the best choice of camping spots. I also experiment with different routes to keep the scenery interesting. This year I am considering taking the train to a nearby town so that I can approach the festival from an entirely new direction.

Every year I try to camp with friends in central Ohio in late May. For years I drove up from North Carolina, 500 miles, but now I have no car, so I've been trying different options. This year I will likely fly into Cleveland with my bike, bike around northeast Ohio for a few days visiting friends and family, and then bike to camp. At the end of the weekend, I will bike 60 miles to Columbus and fly home. Last year was similar except I biked from Cleveland to camp, then from camp to Pittsburgh, where I caught the Great Allegheny Passage down to Cumberland, Maryland, where I caught a train home. I hope to do something similar in the future, but this year I don't have time for 400+ mile trip that I did last time.

After riding the GAP last year, I decided it was easy enough riding that my wife, who only bike occasionally, could handle it. So we, along with my aunt and uncle, rode the trail in the fall as a credit card tour. I'm hoping to find a similar ride to do this year.
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Old 02-24-18, 05:49 AM
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Rowan and I had a good week of cycling!!

Last Sunday we cycled a 200 km randonnee (215.5 km!!)

Then between Tuesday and today we cycled the Great Victorian Rail Trail:
https://www.greatvictorianrailtrail.com.au/

We did a bit extra on the Wednesday so all up, we cycled 312.4 on that cycling tour.

In total: 527.9 km in a week!!


I'll probably do a bit of a write-up about the tour in coming days ... with photos!!
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Old 03-01-18, 05:18 AM
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Victorian Adventure

Our Victorian Adventure started with a 200 km randonnee (Audax Event) on Sunday 18 February.


BNB 200K - Hot Hot Hot

We decided to do our first 200 kilometre Audax cycling event, since the one we did in Canada in June 2017, on mainland Australia in Victoria. As some of you know, our cycling club is Audax Australia, and Audax cycling or Randonneuring is timed ultradistance cycling. Some of our events are a bit shorter 50 km or 100 km ... those are often warm-up events early in the season, or winter events later in the season. But then the bigger events start with the 200 km distance, and go up from there.

This particular event is called a 200K but that's a minimum designation. They can be a bit longer than that, and this one was 215 kilometres. But whatever the distance, it still has to be completed in 13 hours and 30 minutes.

We've cycled some of the roads included on this event before, so we had some idea what to expect, but we've done it under cooler conditions. This ended up being a very hot ride!! Our on-bike thermometers were recording over 40C out there on the road in the sun and the recorded high (always recorded in the shade) was 33C. Fortunately, the clouds did gather toward the end of the day, and the last 50 kilometres were somewhat cooler ... with a threatening storm and a decent tailwind!

Splice (pineapple, lime and vanilla ice cream) and mango ice cream bars really hit the spot, as did lots of cold coke.

There were so many birds ... living in Tasmania, I miss the melodic magpies of the mainland. And there was one large kangaroo who hopped out into the middle of the road, looked at us, and then hopped back into the bush.

One little event stands out … one of those, “you just have to laugh” moments … 1.5 km from the end of the ride, we were stopped by a flag man for road construction. We could almost see the finish! We wanted to finish!! But there we had to wait until it was our turn to go. The flag man was nice about it, and let us go a bit earlier than the cars who were also waiting to give us a head start.

Distance: 215.47 km
Elevation: 1,484 m
Moving Time: 10:55:56
Elapsed Time: 12:34:18
Speed: Avg: 19.7 km/h | Max: 49.7 km/h


A word about equipment ...

We were on our Touring Bicycles rather than our usual distance bicycles because we were planning a little tour in the coming week. Our Touring Bicycles tend to be slightly slower because of their geometry and weight so I am pleased we made it with nearly an hour to spare.

Because we were planning to do both a randonnee and a tour on a gravel rail trail, we brought two sets of tyres … 700x28 slicks and 700x32 tyres with tread. Rowan spent a lot of time changing tyres in just a few days!!

I need new shoes!! My feet are killing me. I got this pair of cycling shoes before my arthritis got as bad as it is, and as a result of the arthritis, my feet are wider. But the shoes are very narrow. In addition, my feet swell when riding long distances and in the heat. I did loosen the worst shoe off part way through the ride, but the damage had been done by then.

BTW - in case you wondered - I put a lot of weight on my feet when I ride.


Monday 19 February was a recovery day. We did do a little bit of walking around Bendigo and Melbourne, but generally took it easy. Except for a flurry of activity about 4 pm. In a matter of minutes, we had to pull up in front of our hotel, off-load everything, check in, haul it all up to our room, and then hop back into the car, get it filled up, and return it. Whew! And then we could relax.


Great Victorian Rail Trail Tour – Tuesday 20 Feb to Saturday 24 Feb
https://www.greatvictorianrailtrail.com.au/

On Tuesday morning, we rolled our bicycles out of the hotel and into the Southern Cross Railway station. There we caught the train to Tallarook, the start of the Great Victorian Rail Trail. For the next 5 days we would not have a car and would depend upon our bicycles to get around.

Train




This tour was a little bit unusual. Usually, I plan the start location of tours and then we go where the wind blows us. I don’t book ahead or plan much more than a day or two in advance. However on this tour, I had everything planned and booked because we not only wanted to tour, we wanted to accomplish something.

A number of years ago, we lived in the area of the Great Victorian Rail Trail and it was finished shortly before we left. We did have the opportunity to cycle portions of it, but had never cycled the whole thing. On this occasion, we wanted to cycle the whole of the Great Victorian Rail Trail to see what it was like and to be able to say we had done it. Therefore I divided the route into 5 days, and booked accommodations accordingly.

Because we had just done a long ride on the weekend, I planned that our first couple days would be a little lighter … shorter rides. Then the next couple days would be a bit longer, and finally the last day would be a shorter one again.

I took the distances from the map below … but discovered as we went along, that they aren’t exact. In fact, not only are the distances on the map a little bit off, there were kilometre markers all along the way, and they weren’t always right either. More on that later!


Day 1: Tallarook to Yea (40 km)
Day 2: Yea to Alexandra (38 km)
Day 3: Alexandra to Mansfield (75 km)
Day 4: Mansfield to Yea (80 km)
Day 5: Yea to Tallarook (40 km)

https://www.greatvictorianrailtrail.com.au/



When we left Tallarook, we didn’t start at the official beginning. But we did find our way onto the trail a few metres from the start. This started an ongoing theme of the ride … the lack of signage. From the train station, there is a sign pointing to “Rail Trail” but it wasn’t clear whether we were to turn left at the first road (which we did) and join the trail there, or get onto the main road and join the trail there.

The trail between Tallarook and Yea was in decent condition, but did require that we pay attention because there were a number of soft spots and tree debris. We noticed that maintenance crews were out, so it was good to see that the trail was still being looked after. The surface is a light, somewhat sandy gravel – light in texture, but also in colour. Because the sun was shining brilliantly, I had to switch to my sunglasses before too long. The somewhat sandy texture also meant that I had to keep my distance from Rowan and I was glad of the mudguards. From time to time, his bicycle would kick up little clouds of dust.

The route wasn’t overly difficult or long, but I think because we were still recovering from Sunday’s ride and because we were still getting used to the heat, by the time we got closer to Yea, I was beginning to wonder whose bright idea this had been … and was beginning to question the wisdom of a tour of this nature right on the heels of a long event.

Halfway Stop




Just before we arrived in Yea, we decided to stop at the ice cream shop we used to frequent when we lived in the area. Unfortunately, when we got into town, we discovered it was gone. And although there are a collection of bakeries and take-aways, what we wanted was ice cream. We ended up at the IGA, consuming more Splice and mango ice cream bars!

And then we checked into a lovely cabin in the Yea Riverside Caravan Park. This park looks better than it used to and the cabin we were in, as well as a few others near it, appeared to be brand new. Plus it had air conditioning!!

So while I did enjoy the fact that it was another gorgeously hot summer day -- up to 37C on the trail, but a bit lower than that in the shade – it was also lovely to relax in the air conditioning and watch the winter Olympics.

A little later we walked into town to have dinner, then did something we had not done in the time we lived in this area … we visited the Yea Wetlands! It was lovely in there with lots of birds and one brown snake. Poisonous, of course.

Distance: 40.26 km
Elevation: 333 m
Moving Time: 2: 50 :11
Elapsed Time: 3:57:48
Speed: Avg: 14.2 km/h | Max: 26.6 km/h

Plus, a 3.6 km walk.


Day 2 of the tour ended up being three rides for a total of 63.4 km. First, we set off for Alexandra, approximately 38 km away on a cooler morning.

The route took us gradually uphill to the Cheviot Tunnel, a long abandoned train tunnel. It is quite an interesting feature on the route, and because it is a long tunnel, you’re in complete darkness soon after cycling in. So lights are recommended! Poor Rowan’s light wasn’t working quite right so he did most of it in the dark. I also found that, even with the light showing me what was in front of me, I needed to focus on the light at the end of the tunnel in order to continue to ride in a straight line. A person could use that as a metaphor for struggles in life!

Cheviot Tunnel




The next route highlight was the Eglinton Cutting near Alexandra with a view out to Cathedral Mountain and Torbreck. It was so nice to see that view again!

Then we descended into Alexandra. Good ol’ Alexandra. We’ve missed that town! We spent a bit of time cycling around and walking up and down the main street checking out what was the same and what has changed. After lunch, we went to see some friends … so good to see everyone again!!

I liked this ... a kangaroo made from a bicycle wheel.




From there we dropped our stuff off at our cabin, and then went for our second ride of the day out our familiar “usual route”. Couldn’t go back into the area again and not visit one of our favourite cycling routes!!

Later, we went for our third ride to visit our friends, Simone and Ross, and check out their ‘boat house’. Last time we had been in the area, it was partially built. It’s pretty much finished now, and is beautiful! Ross built the house using traditional techniques, including mortise and tenon joins in all the timberwork and including dowels to keep it all together. And the walls are mud brick. It’s very impressive. It was also very nice to sit on their deck, overlooked by kangaroos and overlooking their view on a warm summer evening and catch up.


Day 3 looked a bit threatening when we set off in the morning, as though it might rain. Instead, it was just very overcast, very muggy, and very warm.

Back up and over Eglinton Cutting with a brief stop for another look at the view, and onward to Yarck. There we stopped at another friend, Sandy’s, place for a lovely visit. One highlight while there was that I tried my hand at spinning wool … with a spinning wheel! It’s a bit like patting one’s head while rubbing one’s tummy. It would take a bit of practice to get on to it.

From there the trail climbed steadily for approximately 20 km to Merton … and it was definitely time for ice cream when we got to Merton! We're using our touring bicycles with a bit of a load on these days so uphills are slow going. After Merton the vegetation changed from all eucalypts to some pine trees lining the paths and dropping orange needles everywhere. Last time we cycled there, we saw some impressively large red mushrooms and I watched for them, but didn’t see any. Must be the wrong season.

An impressively large red mushroom from the last time we cycled there




Next, we came to Lake Eildon. We had been told it was down to about 60% and it looked it. We whisked through Bonnie Doon, hardly noticing it. This was another place that could have done with more signage from that side. Nevertheless, a highlight of this portion of the trail is the long cycling bridge across a section of Lake Eildon.

I mentioned earlier that there were kilometre markers all along the way, and they weren’t always right. This was one of the spots where we noticed quite a difference … it was as though Mansfield was slowly moving away from us!

However, eventually we did get into Mansfield and were soon cooling off on the deck of our cabin, drinking coffee, listening to the magpies sing as they walk around and the Olympics on TV in the cabin. Later that evening we walked into town and while looking for something to eat, came across a pub having a Mexican week. What luck! My favourite food!!

And then we took the opportunity to do laundry.

Since the trail at this end is a darker gravel/chert, and since it was still fairly warm and humid, what you can't see in the photo below is that my legs are covered in a dark dust/dirt which puffs up when we cycle through it, and sticks to my sweaty legs.

Mansfield




Distance: 80.74 km
Elevation: 566 m
Moving Time: 5:22:20
Elapsed Time: 7:44:58
Speed: Avg: 15.0 km/h | Max: 27.7 km/h

Plus, a 1.6 km walk.


Continued ...
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Old 03-01-18, 05:19 AM
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Day 4
Rowan had been carrying cereal till now, but it was all gone, so we decided to go out for breakfast for our last couple days on the trail and that was a good way to start our longest day on the trail. And it was another hot, muggy, overcast day. But we are enjoying summer!! We don't get much of a summer back in Tasmania.

Breakfast



Since we had made it to the end of the rail trail yesterday, we were now heading back, the first trail highlight was, of course, the bridge over Lake Eildon! This time, when we cycled through Bonnie Doon, we did notice some signage pointing to the business area. So it is there, but we do think it could be more obvious throughout the trail.

The next highlight was the descent to Yarck. That was nice!!

Bonnie Doon Bridge over Lake Eildon







Then the climb up to the Cheviot Tunnel again. This climb seemed long, but it’s possible I was a little tired from all the cycling lately. It was good when we got to the top, and it was cool and dark inside the tunnel. And the descent down into Yea was great! Partway down we met another couple who were climbing up. They were already a bit tired, but I guess they had something of a headwind and they were also carrying quite a bit more than we were.

We were into Yea in no time, and of course stopped for ice cream. Yep, fuelled by ice cream on this trip!

Cheviot Tunnel




Back into the same lovely cabin again … that’s one thing about doing these out-and-backs, you get to know the people running the caravan parks a little bit. And this evening we walked to one of the restaurants I had wanted to visit when we lived in this area. I don’t know why we never went there before, but this seemed like a good opportunity and the food was good.

Distance: 87.66 km
Elevation: 461 m
Moving Time: 5:25:02
Elapsed Time: 7:35:10
Speed: Avg: 16.2 km/h | Max: 32.4 km/h

Plus, a 1.4 km walk.


On the last day we went out to breakfast to another place I’d heard about when we lived here, but had never been to. This was a trip of doing things we had meant to do but never had the opportunity to do before. While there, a number of cyclists came and went. Because it was a Saturday, it appeared we would have more company on the trail.

Day 5 was a short day again, and our last day on the trail. The trail at this end doesn't have as nice a surface as the rest. It's more gravelly and soft so it made for a bit more work. Also, although it looked like it was going to rain at any moment, it was hot and humid.

Because we were hot and thought a cold drink would be nice, we decided to stop at a hotel we used to see when we drove into Melbourne. A few years ago, it was a beautiful, historical, busy place that served lunches and teas and all sorts. But now, it looks half abandoned, and they certainly weren't serving lunches. We went in any way to get something to drink and were sold two cans of coke for ... wait for it ... $12!! I check Trip Advisor, and it looks like the place started to go downhill about 2 years ago. That's sad.

But much of the trail follows the Goulburn River so it's scenic. And before long, we were back in Tallarook where we started.

Tallarook







We were there well in time to catch the early train back into Melbourne when an announcement came that it was cancelled. Oh dear. When they cancel trains, they replace them with coaches but coaches don't take bicycles. Our only choice was to wait for the next train and hope it would turn up.

Train Station



Meanwhile a couple came to the station house, after a bit, we started chatting with them. Apparently, they rent the place as a "holiday home" because they like trains and like getting out into the country. And the town likes to have them there because they come out every couple weeks keep the place up so it looks nice. He told us all sorts of things about the history of the station ... very interesting.

Our train did come and we were on our way to Melbourne. That evening, we went for a walk to look for a place to eat and found a lovely little "alleyway" lined with restaurants and chose a great Italian place. Lots of atmosphere ... people watching, music, and all.

It felt a little odd to be finished. We were just getting into the swing of things and wish we could keep going for another week. It was a much-needed break. Both of us have been so busy ... it was nice to just have one thing to do each day: cycle. Also, it is so good to get off the island every so often.

Distance: 40.40 km
Elevation: 329m
Moving Time: 2:45:03
Elapsed Time: 4:45:32
Speed: Avg: 14.7 km/h | Max: 25.6 km/h

Plus, a 2.4 km walk.


In Summary

Rowan and I had a good week of cycling!! Plus, we actually had some summer!!

On the Sunday we cycled a 200 km randonnee (215.5 km!!) ... a timed long distance event.

Then between Tuesday and Saturday we cycled the Great Victorian Rail Trail as a cycling tour:
https://www.greatvictorianrailtrail.com.au/

We did a bit extra on the Wednesday so all up, we cycled 312.4 on that cycling tour.

In total: 527.9 km in a week!!


Lots of photos starting with the ones on 20Feb17:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...09134945/page1
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Old 03-08-18, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Taking the train to the next state and cycling their rail trails?
I think most (if not all) of our states are smaller than yours.


Current plan is to take the train from Pennsylvania to northern Vermont then ride back home , with a two-day stop at my 35th high school reunion in western Massachusetts. Thirteen days total on the road. I did a shorter version of this a few years ago. I have also done three cross-Pennsylvania tours where I have rented a car one way and ridden home. Much prefer the train, but for trips like that the logistics can be difficult, if not impossible. Even flying out west for tours is, to me, preferable to driving 6 or 7 hours.
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Old 03-09-18, 03:23 PM
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Airplanes are not cars?

Bringing my car to Ireland? it's a left hand drive, place, like Au/NZ,

I adapted well to riding my bicycle on the other side of the road..

Reflexively turned to the left side of a narrow road when a car was approaching,
for a little while, after I came back to Oregon.

Bicycle touring is car free, though while on the tours I may use ferry boats and busses..

and then Fly home...




..

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Old 03-09-18, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Bringing my car to Ireland? it's left hand drive, I adapted well to riding my bicycle on the other side of the road..
I drove my left hand drive car from Germany to England and found adapting easy once I left the customs area in Dover. Only traffic circles/roundabouts caused me to think twice about in which lane to drive.
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Old 03-10-18, 11:57 AM
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Oregon a bit further.. no drive on drive off ferries , just the drive off delivery ships from Asia..


Saw on Top Gear.. 1st Landrovers thought iit a good idea to put the wheel in the center ..


I think Mclaren did that too , for different reasons??
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Old 07-07-18, 12:06 AM
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Is anyone travelling car free in the summer in the northern hemisphere 2018?
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Old 09-03-18, 02:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Is anyone travelling car free in the summer in the northern hemisphere 2018?
Well?

Did no one travel anywhere car free in the NH summer?
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Old 09-03-18, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Well?

Did no one travel anywhere car free in the NH summer?
Ocracoke Island, North Carolina, has no rental cars, so all transportation beyond the airport has to be by bike and trailer We go there several weekends each summer.
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Old 09-03-18, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Well?

Did no one travel anywhere car free in the NH summer?
Sadly, I did not take any time off this summer. I'm new at my job, and the fiscal year starts July 1. I didn't accrue enough vacation days. Not only that, I had a summer project I needed to complete for the fall semester, rebuilding a computer lab. Next summer, I will have enough days to take off, so I look forward to that. The semester starts tomorrow, and I feel like I had a good summer anyway. We have a house in the country where I spend weekends. My wife has been there more than I have, as she can be there on summer weekdays, so we've been apart a little, but that's OK. Today (Monday, a holiday in the US) was a very hot day, and it's nice to have one of those days right before fall starts. I'm on the bus on the way back to the city as I write this, so this is the closing hour of the summer for me. This summer was good, and the next one will be better. I plan to keep riding all year, though not as many miles per month.
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Old 09-04-18, 08:32 PM
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I didn't travel car free as I rented one at the airport to drive the 35 miles or so to the city I was visiting. But it didn't occur to me until I was driving back to the airport at the end of the week that the car had remained parked in the driveway the rest of the time. It was very nice spending a week walking everywhere.
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Old 09-04-18, 09:53 PM
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Originally Posted by jon c. View Post
I didn't travel car free as I rented one at the airport to drive the 35 miles or so to the city I was visiting. But it didn't occur to me until I was driving back to the airport at the end of the week that the car had remained parked in the driveway the rest of the time. It was very nice spending a week walking everywhere.


We've done that in the past ... driven to where we want to go, then parked the vehicle and walked or cycled everywhere for the next several days.


It's especially nice when we visit relatively flat places and can just hop on the bicycle and go!
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Old 10-09-18, 08:09 AM
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Any Autumn / Spring trips?
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Old 10-10-18, 02:58 PM
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We experience a big drop in tourist traffic, and that includes bicycle tourists ,
on the Oregon Coast ,
because 1, school has started , so parents stay home ,
and the rainy season has begun ,

so a long dry period has ended , with the north pacific high ,
being moved off by the jet stream

and the tilt of the earth in orbit, is now angling away from the sun,
until 12/21 when it begins to move the other way..




....
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Old 11-01-18, 12:45 PM
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Not summer and not entirely car-free, but mostly. My wife and drove ourselves and two, packed up bikes to the airport. Landed in St. Louis and assembled some bikes outside the airport (mistake. We should have gotten a shuttle to the hotel where we were dropping off our bike boxes and assembled the bikes there.) Had a "fun" time trying to get two bikes, loaded with luggage, and a full sized bike box a half a mile away to the hotel, but we did it, and with the bike box secured, we pedaled off to a bed and breakfast in St. Charles, about 10 miles away. It was Octoberfest in St. Charles, unbeknownst to us. I like Octoberfest in St. Charles. In the morning we biked across St. Charles to meet a shuttle, my aunt and uncle, and two more cyclists. Six bikes, six vacationers, luggage, and one driver got into or on to the van, and we spent a couple of hours riding away from St. Charles. Then we spent 5 days biking back to St. Charles on the Katy Trail.

Apart from the shuttle, there was a little extra car use at the end of the ride. My uncle had some mechanical issues at the end of the 2nd to last day, so he and my aunt stayed behind while my wife and road to St. Charles to fetch their car, then we drove back and picked them up, then they drove us back to the hotel that had our bike box.

The next day we biked back to the airport where we could catch the light rail into downtown St. Louis. We did touristy things and ate fried ravioli and came back to the hotel where we packed up some bikes. In the morning we took a shuttle to the airport and returned home.
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