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Oslo: zero pedestrian and cycling deaths in 2019

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Oslo: zero pedestrian and cycling deaths in 2019

Old 01-05-20, 12:22 PM
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Oslo: zero pedestrian and cycling deaths in 2019

So the radical redesign of downtown Oslo is working, in terms of traffic safety:

https://usa.streetsblog.org/2020/01/...s-road-deaths/

The only traffic death was the driver in a single car accident.

Last edited by cooker; 01-05-20 at 12:25 PM.
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Old 01-08-20, 06:53 PM
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Allo?
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Old 01-11-20, 01:30 PM
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Cyclist and pedestrian deaths are increasing in my urban area :-(((.
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Old 01-18-20, 12:04 PM
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From the article:
"Oslo leaders also sought to tame aggressive drivers in other neighborhoods. They drastically lowered speed limits inside and outside downtown areas,"

__________________

Good post.

A lot of cities like New York simply built bicycle infrastructure and did nothing to lower speeds. This is why we are seeing more cycling deaths than ever before. I guess people thought more cyclist on the road will slow down traffic but instead we became the invisible guard rail!

We have to build no less than one 15 mph speed hump on every side street street and a 25 mph hump on boulevards. If that doesn't slow the cars down, make them higher! Second, cities should install automated speed enforcement cameras on EVERY block at $150.00 dollars a ticket that escalates $100.00 more per each infraction! Use all the moneys collected from the fines to narrow all streets.
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Old 02-14-20, 11:43 AM
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Interesting read, and nice to see a city getting it right to keep those of us on 2 wheels safe
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Old 02-24-20, 11:09 AM
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The most significant move Oslo officials made was devising a plan in 2015 to restrict cars from its square-mile city center and hike fees for entering and parking around the city’s core. Tolls rose in 2017 as the city removed 700 parking spaces and replaced them with 37 miles of bike lanes and pocket parks. The city center ban went into effect in early 2019 despite misgivings, but it was regarded as a model for other metropolises six months later. Cities around the U.S. have been slow to follow up on such success, though New York and San Francisco recently added a car-free thoroughfare to its transit mix.

Oslo leaders also sought to tame aggressive drivers in other neighborhoods. They drastically lowered speed limits inside and outside downtown areas, expanded its bike network, and established “Hjertesoners” or “heart zones” where vehicles are not permitted to pick up or drop off children around each primary school. New York City is especially bad at that, as Streetsblog NYC reported.
...if they did this here in Sacramento, the people who have both guns and pickups would rise up in armed revolution.
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Old 04-11-20, 02:59 PM
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New York City has also taken substantial steps to prevent cyclist fatalities including more protected bike lanes. I wonder how it has been working....
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Old 04-14-20, 07:37 AM
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Seems like Oslo is the safest city for cyclists. That's great.
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Old 04-16-20, 09:19 PM
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Pedestrian deaths have been decreasing across much of America, the exceptions being those states which have legalized weed, I worked for some years as a traffic homicide investigator, and know the stats well. Nowadays I live in Japan, where pedestrian and cyclist accident fatalities are very rare. Japan has a coupe of policies which help keep roads safer. First, there is liability. In any accident, both parties are considered liable. The person who causes the accident has the larger share of the liability, the other person a smaller amount. If you are rear-ended while stopped at a stop light, you are partially at fault because you were driving a car. Next, any accident involving an injury is considered a crime. If you injure another person while driving a car, you are held criminally responsible, regardless of the actions of the person you hit. If a drunk guy dressed as a ninja falls asleep on the highway at night, and you run him over and kill him, you are going to jail.

I was looking at an old movie of Tokyo which was shot in 1960 or so, and the movie showed one of the many police boxes which you see around Tokyo. Next to the box was as sign showing the number of people in the district hurt and killed in accidents. The sign showed 50 injured, and 6 killed for the month. Nowadays such a district would not see 6 deaths a decade, and the number of fatalities around Japan is remarkably low when you consider how many people commute on foot or by bicycle, and how many cars and trucks share the roads with them.
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Old 04-17-20, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling View Post
Pedestrian deaths have been decreasing across much of America, the exceptions being those states which have legalized weed,
Is it the drivers or pedestrians who are stoned?


EDIT - actually this study suggests it was a temporary effect, possibly due to a sudden increase in new, inexperienced users, and settles down after a year.
https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/5/18...-public-health
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Old 04-17-20, 11:53 AM
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling View Post
Japan has a coupe of policies which help keep roads safer.

I was looking at an old movie of Tokyo which was shot in 1960 or so, and the movie showed one of the many police boxes which you see around Tokyo. Next to the box was as sign showing the number of people in the district hurt and killed in accidents. The sign showed 50 injured, and 6 killed for the month. Nowadays such a district would not see 6 deaths a decade, and the number of fatalities around Japan is remarkably low when you consider how many people commute on foot or by bicycle, and how many cars and trucks share the roads with them.
Also worth noting that Japan has zero tolerance for DUI. I lived there for years and never saw anybody drive after taking even a single drink. Not saying it never happens, but obviously a lot less common than in the US. Many people told me that if you get caught, you lose your license, period - no wrist slaps.

As for higher accident rates circa 1960, this was probably due at least in part to having a lot of new, inexperienced drivers on the road. It seems to be a common phenomenon in societies as they become more prosperous. Then the rates go down gradually with more experience, enforcement, safer road design etc.
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Old 04-17-20, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Pobble.808 View Post
Also worth noting that Japan has zero tolerance for DUI. I lived there for years and never saw anybody drive after taking even a single drink. Not saying it never happens, but obviously a lot less common than in the US. Many people told me that if you get caught, you lose your license, period - no wrist slaps.

As for higher accident rates circa 1960, this was probably due at least in part to having a lot of new, inexperienced drivers on the road. It seems to be a common phenomenon in societies as they become more prosperous. Then the rates go down gradually with more experience, enforcement, safer road design etc.
When I got my license in Japan, I went the full route. I had to attend driving school, which is most bookwork, as the written test contains some 200 questions. Many are obscure, and designed to trick you, of the five possible answers, more than one may be correct, but you have to choose the most correct. Then you have to spend a number of hours behind the wheel with an instructor. After each session, you get a mark in your card. Then you need to attend a safety course, practice in a simulator, and get a CPR card. Next is the written test, which is taken in a large room with at least 100 other people. About half fail the written test on their first attempt.

Next is the driving test. Normally this is done on a close course, but when I took my test, the course was being renovated, so I had to take the test on the open road during rush hour. Everyone fails their first attempt, half fail their second attempt, some never pass. A person I took my test with was on her 8th attempt (which she failed). Each attempt costs 3000 yen. I passed on my second attempt, and was quite proud of myself.

Overall, the cost is about $3000 for a basic car license. When I renewed my license I had to sit through a long lecture with 150 other people, watch a movie, pay a fee, and get my renewed license. I kept my nose clean, had no violations, and the second time I was renewed, I was given a "gold" license. One of the advantages of a gold license is cheaper insurance, and you can renew your license at a less crowded center.

The standards for a license in Japan are very high, not to mention the cost. But the rules of the road are beaten into you, and people drive more safely as a result.
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Old 05-16-20, 01:58 PM
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I used to live in Oslo and whilst it must be safe according to the numbers it is certainly not friendly to the cyclist. There are hardly any bike lanes or cyclists. Its just that most people take public transport and the main car traffic is directed underground though tunnels that bypass the city.
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Old 05-16-20, 02:01 PM
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Copenhagen on the other hand is great for cyclists. Lots of big bike lanes and it seems that cyclists have the right of way in almost all situations. Cars are actively looking out for cyclists and expect us to be undertaking them at traffic lights and therefore will not turn until completely clear. Because there are so many bikes I think it actually becomes more dangerous.
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Old 05-16-20, 02:02 PM
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And also it is socially acceptable in Copenhagen to DUI which adds to the chaos!
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Old 05-16-20, 06:33 PM
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^^what do you mean?

Originally Posted by meltonmezzrow View Post
I used to live in Oslo and whilst it must be safe according to the numbers it is certainly not friendly to the cyclist. There are hardly any bike lanes or cyclists. Its just that most people take public transport and the main car traffic is directed underground though tunnels that bypass the city.
When did you live there? They did major upgrades and policy changes from 2015-2019

https://usa.streetsblog.org/2020/01/...s-road-deaths/

Last edited by cooker; 05-16-20 at 06:36 PM.
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Old 05-17-20, 03:56 PM
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I guess I could be out of touch. I lived there until 2015, cycling all the time and go back at least once a year but haven't been riding. I just didn't notice much difference especially comparing it to here in Copenhagen where there are bike lanes everywhere, even more than roads. The main focus is bikes and I just haven't felt anything close to that in Oslo. What I mean is that cycling is very popular here and also drinking is very popular here. Not many people think twice about riding their bike home after a few drinks and many do it whilst barely conscious.
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