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I'm exhibiting at a sustainability fair - need tips

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I'm exhibiting at a sustainability fair - need tips

Old 02-22-20, 10:57 AM
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trailz 
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I'm exhibiting at a sustainability fair - need tips

A neighboring community of ours holds an annual sustainable living fair and they've asked me to man a booth to teach others ways they might live care-lite. I plan to have my bicycle with various panniers attached as well as some posters featuring the benefits of bicycling and what to consider to bike safely. I'm also planning on having a tip sheet with some basic information on ways people can run errands or commute without a car.

Some tips I'm thinking:
- Be aware of the weather
- Invest in waterproof clothes and shoot
- Learn Google Maps - biking directions
- Add time for your longer trips
- Economize by combining multiple stops per trip, in a strategic order
- Invest in good waterproof bags or panniers
- Remind yourself that you are living a carbon-neutral life

If you don't mind and have some basic and practical points I can consider adding, I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks.
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Old 02-22-20, 11:01 AM
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rumrunn6
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How about seek employers that are supportive with bike parking and private cleaning/changing areas?
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Old 02-22-20, 12:39 PM
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Ghazmh
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Good waterproof panniers and or handlebar bag.

strong rack that is correctly attached to frame and designed to handle the loads it’s carrying.

lights. Blinking lights to be seen with. Bright solid light for evening illumination.

bright clothes, proper fitting helmet.
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Old 02-22-20, 08:20 PM
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JoeyBike
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I think the biggest change for me, which happened gradually, was my sensibilities toward cycling in bad weather. When I first started commuting by bike I would only go if the forecast was 20% chance of rain or less. Then before too long 30%. After several months I absolutely didn't care. I developed a sort of "BRING IT" attitude towards weather.

My point being, most Americans can't even fathom riding a bike anywhere in bad weather, much less to work. I would try to impress on interested parties that changes will occur in their sensibilities. Either they will give up, or they just won't care. No way to find out who you are without making the attempt. I also believe pushing a car-light lifestyle is much more appealing and possible for the average Joe or Jane than car-free.

Good luck!
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Old 02-23-20, 12:37 AM
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https://blog.carnextdoor.com.au/live-car-free/
https://www.abc.net.au/life/cheaper-...g-car/10557788
https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2014/1...without-a-car/
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Old 02-23-20, 06:27 AM
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How about pushing a bicycle purchase program where we get a voucher to purchase a bike and gear, like they have in the UK.
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Old 02-23-20, 10:35 AM
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Maybe also take some info on bike trailers (cargo, Travoy, etc.) and kid carriers? Burley makes both, I'm sure some other brands do as well. Maybe get some images of folks with kids on their cargo bikes. Where I live lots of folks have gotten rid of the second car in favor of an electric cargo bike, used to take kids to school, shop, etc. Even reducing down to one car per family is a step in the right direction.
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Old 02-23-20, 02:47 PM
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Have some route planning stuff, so you can show people it's possible without cycling on busy roads (assuming it is possible, YMMV), and that it needn't take much longer - bikes can bypass traffic.

Bike set up advice - I often see people with the saddle so low my knees are screaming in pain just watching them!

Information about local groups who can support people new to sustainable transport - maybe bus information?
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Old 02-23-20, 02:56 PM
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Show people how to lock their bike properly, using a u-lock and a cable.

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Old 02-24-20, 10:25 AM
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- If they do live in an area where buses have bike racks, planning their bike routes near those bus routes means they have a backup plan when they get a flat.
- weather is overrated. Having messy hair or no make-up is a better look than obesity. I've come to love biking in the wind and rain. Biking changes you.
- cargo trailers solve a lot of problems. I have a Burly rated for 100lbs (might be 150lbs) and I've used it for hauling lumber and furniture. Here's a photo from last week where someone, 1.5 miles away, gave us a cat-tree.

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Old 02-24-20, 11:14 AM
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3alarmer
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Originally Posted by trailz View Post

If you don't mind and have some basic and practical points I can consider adding, I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks.
...the tip about "always making eye contact with the drivers you encounter at intersections and other conflict points", while properly included in a course on riding safety, is not out of place in tips on commuting.
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Old 02-24-20, 01:12 PM
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...the tip about "always making eye contact with the drivers you encounter at intersections and other conflict points", while properly included in a course on riding safety, is not out of place in tips on commuting.
Yeah, this is a good tip. I would also add mounting a good strong headlight on your helmet so you can direct it at a driver that doesn't seem to want to look in your direction.
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Old 02-24-20, 02:40 PM
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Promote the convenience of bicycling in general more than the convenience of extra bicycling gear that isn't always necessary. Transportation by bicycle is a convenient and fun way to get around more than a series of problems to be solved by purchasing products. People can become hooked on easier bicycling destinations and progress to riding in more difficult conditions. The environmental benefits of bicycling are neither as apparent nor as enticing as the conveniences of bicycling. While some people might go way out of their way to ride for the reduction in carbon footprint, being more environmentally friendly can also be more of a convenience than a sacrifice.

Print a map of a popular destination like a concert venue, church, or ballpark overlaid with bicycling travel times to/from that location. I can take my bicycle from the stadium to my home and back again three times over before I'd get a car out of the stadium's parking lot.
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Old 02-24-20, 08:05 PM
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I did something like this about a year ago! It was pretty fun.

One of the biggest concerns that people had - about using a bicycle as transportation, in general - was safety in traffic. I think it's good to have some information about safety gear, and remind newer riders that the route you take in a car probably isn't the route you'll take on a bike! If your town/city/county has information about bike lanes and paths, that would be a good resource to include.
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Old 02-25-20, 05:10 AM
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Jim from Boston
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...the tip about "always making eye contact with the drivers you encounter at intersections and other conflict points", while properly included in a course on riding safety, is not out of place in tips on commuting.
IMO, as a decades-long cycle-commuter in Boston, while I might smile at a driver making eye contact, I would not necessarily trust any directive given by a motorist, While looking in your direction, that does not mean they see you.

Hand signals might actually direct you into a situation unrecognized by the driver, by the so-called “niceholes” e.g waving you through onto the next lane with an upcoming car.

Similarly I don’t give directions to motorists, e.g. waving them to pass me.

I frequently have posted (link) about my mindset to increase my situational awareness, and if I have one single recommendation, it’s to use a rearview mirror.

↓↓↓↓

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 02-25-20 at 08:21 AM.
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Old 02-25-20, 05:18 AM
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ɅɅɅɅ
Originally Posted by wipekitty View Post
I did something like this about a year ago! It was pretty fun.

One of the biggest concerns that people had - about using a bicycle as transportation, in general - was safety in traffic...
.Not to be a Captain Bringdown, but I have posted on several threads:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Frankly, I have posted that I would not be inclined to encourage, unless by example (nor discourage) someone to cycle-commute, but if they so chose, I would freely and gladly give any advice...

Public exhortations to cycle-commute, or utility cycle are well and good with no individual responsibility for bad outcomes, but I would not want the recriminations of a personal endorsement if something bad happened...

FWW, I’m not advocatin’ against, just sayin’.
It’s very rare that any door-to door cycle commute would totally exclude any non-residential road; see these two recent concurrent threads: “
Thinking of no longer riding on roads,"and "Giving up riding on the road"

Even,
Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Are you guys still at it? Recent threads seem to indicate that a cyclists only risk on the road is distracted drivers. This is FALSE! 50% of cyclist fatalities do not involve a car!

The cyclist collided with a fixed object or lost control due to a road surface irregularity or slick condition…
and other hazards included in riding on seemingly safe MUPS and sidewalks.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 02-25-20 at 05:57 AM.
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Old 02-25-20, 08:26 AM
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I'm not car-free, but I'm a 28-year bike commuter, so I guess I'm car-light, and have surprised myself at what I can do on a bike.

I'm 58 and the health, physical and mental benefits cannot be overstated.

My tips...

Routes to ride...DON'T THINK LIKE A CAR! If your average speed is going to be 10-15 mph any street will do. Quiet, residential streets are safer and more pleasant than busy street. And while you may add a mile or two to avoid traffic, that is only 5- 6 extra minutes a mile. What's the rush!?

Don't trust Google Maps 100% for the best bike routes. Although it gets better and better thanks to crowd sourcing, you know your town and comfort level better than Google Maps. And if you're using it, you have internet. Do some "Street View" and "Satellite View" reconaissance before you ride an unfamiliar route. A striped bike lane next to fast, heavy traffic can be stressfull. Riding down a quiet residential street, even with no bike lane, is delightful.

Lights, mirrors...HORN! If you're gonna ride in or around traffic: See, Be Seen, Be Heard! I've been using a "re-pumpable" Delta AirZound airhorn on my bikes for almost 25 years. It makes a huge difference!

Full fenders make for drier riding. Hot, heavy, full rain gear is not always necessary...light, breathable gear may be enough.

Don't over-dress in the winter...dress for being comfortable after 10-15 minutes of riding...you WILL warm up. If you sweat, you freeze. But bring an extra layer or two of clothing, just in case.

Headphones and music? Not safe in my opinion...but for the last 9 years I've been listening to spoken-word podcasts in my curbside ear at low volume and it has made riding more enjoyable. Old, repetitive routes are now filled with new, interesting podcasts. Long rides and minor physical discomforts are made more bearable, and I even look forward to listening to a podcast, so then I look forward to the ride. I can always pause the podcast and just listen to the world around me.

And as long as you have an earphone in, you can make and receive hands-free calls and texts and reminders to self, plus internet inquiries depending on the digital assistant you use.

If I am riding to meet friends for a meal or socializing, I bring fresh clean clothes, deoderant and body spray, and deoderant wipes...same as riding to work. If it is very hot, I arrive early enough to dry-off, freshen-up and change.

The hardest part is getting started.

If it helps, here is a link to some of my commutes:
https://www.youtube.com/user/bgvideo62/playlists

Last edited by BobbyG; 02-25-20 at 01:22 PM.
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Old 02-25-20, 09:17 AM
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Jim from Boston
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I'm exhibiting at a sustainability fair - need tips
Originally Posted by wipekitty View Post
I did something like this about a year ago! It was pretty fun
Though I had posted earlier on this thread,
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Frankly, I have posted that I would not be inclined to encourage, unless by example (nor discourage) someone to cycle-commute, but if they so chose, I would freely and gladly give any advice...
back around 1971, early in my cycling lifestyle,
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…Back in the 60’s in the Motor City, I had an “English Racer,’ and longed to tour at about age 14, but then joined the car culture. In Ann Arbor MI in the 70’s I really realized the utility of bicycles for commuting, and began touring on a five-speed Schwinn Suburban, but soon bought a Mercier as did my girlfriend, later my wife. We toured in Michigan and Ontario.

In 1977 we moved to Boston on our bikes, as a bicycling honeymoon from Los Angeles to Washington, DC and then took the train up to Boston…
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I got involved with a local advocacy group, mostly political and not otherwise an active cycling organization. I think it was called the Ann Arbor Bicycle Coalition.

I was interviewed on a local radio talk show on WAAM as I recall, about a bicycle rally the group was holding.

For that event, I mapped out a bike route on residential streets similar to an automobile road rally where the winner arrives closest to the predetermined time I established for a “safe” ride..

I think that back then the big push was for more sidewalk curb cuts.
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Old 02-25-20, 09:25 AM
  #19  
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It's not just about cycling.

Having backup/alternate plans: unfortunately, bikes are a bit less reliable than cars, so having a backup bike, or being aware of the location of shareable bikes, or knowing public transit routes, or even being prepared to use ride-hailing services like Uber (you said car-"lite" after all) occasionally (but not too often!!), all would be good tips.
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Old 02-25-20, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by cooker View Post
Having backup/alternate plans: unfortunately, bikes are a bit less reliable than cars ...
Not mine. I don't know about your bikes but the only thing that stops one of mine is a flat, and since switching to Bontrager Hardcase clinchers four years ago, flats have not been an issue. Period. Meanwhile ... co-workers miss meetings because their car didn't start. I see customers stranded in Box Store parking lot waiting for AAA. I can throw a bike on a bus carrier rack whether or not something is wrong with it. I want to see someone with a stalled car even get it out of the way of other traffic without help. I see cars in the morning that were obviously vandalized the previous night. They won't be going anywhere that day, and probably the next several days. IF one of my bikes were ever vandalized or stolen, I have 9 more. No, you can't be serious. Bikes are simple, efficient and very low maintenance. Drivers are the ones that need backup options but they rarely have them. A significant percent of the homeless people on the streets of America lost access to their car in some way. EVERYTHING went south after that. Life, as we know it, ended for them because they suddenly couldn't jump in their car and drive off to work anymore. We've got to find a better way ...
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Old 02-25-20, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Not mine. I don't know about your bikes but the only thing that stops one of mine is a flat, and since switching to Bontrager Hardcase clinchers four years ago, flats have not been an issue. Period. Meanwhile ... co-workers miss meetings because their car didn't start. I see customers stranded in Box Store parking lot waiting for AAA. I can throw a bike on a bus carrier rack whether or not something is wrong with it. I want to see someone with a stalled car even get it out of the way of other traffic without help. I see cars in the morning that were obviously vandalized the previous night. They won't be going anywhere that day, and probably the next several days. IF one of my bikes were ever vandalized or stolen, I have 9 more. No, you can't be serious. Bikes are simple, efficient and very low maintenance. Drivers are the ones that need backup options but they rarely have them. A significant percent of the homeless people on the streets of America lost access to their car in some way. EVERYTHING went south after that. Life, as we know it, ended for them because they suddenly couldn't jump in their car and drive off to work anymore. We've got to find a better way ...
Yes, I am serious. New cyclist aren't going to have your skills and knowledge and will be set back by a simple flat or will other routine problem. You've probably done roadside repairs in addition to routine maintenance - do you think they will all suddenly be able to do it? And in fact you do have some of the back up plans I suggested for them - extra bikes, and knowledge of buses.

Last edited by cooker; 02-25-20 at 11:07 AM.
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Old 02-25-20, 01:23 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by JoeyBike View Post
I think the biggest change for me, which happened gradually, was my sensibilities toward cycling in bad weather. When I first started commuting by bike I would only go if the forecast was 20% chance of rain or less. Then before too long 30%. After several months I absolutely didn't care. I developed a sort of "BRING IT" attitude towards weather.

My point being, most Americans can't even fathom riding a bike anywhere in bad weather, much less to work. I would try to impress on interested parties that changes will occur in their sensibilities. Either they will give up, or they just won't care. No way to find out who you are without making the attempt. I also believe pushing a car-light lifestyle is much more appealing and possible for the average Joe or Jane than car-free.

Good luck!
Thank you! This is very much my own experience with going car-lite years ago. Thank you for the reminder.
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Old 02-28-20, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post

I frequently have posted (link) about my mindset to increase my situational awareness, and if I have one single recommendation, it’s to use a rearview mirror.
....I haven't used a mirror in many years. I find it a distraction in heavy traffic, and I still have the feeling that the most important stuff is where I'm going.
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Old 03-02-20, 12:59 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
....I haven't used a mirror in many years. I find it a distraction in heavy traffic, and I still have the feeling that the most important stuff is where I'm going.
Helmet or glasses mounted mirror allows you to see what's behind you whilst still being able to see traffic ahead of you. I like the Take-a-look mirror for use on my sunglasses. I also have a helmet mounted mirror I use sometimes. What I like about both of those is that they are NOT wide-angle and that means that the item you see in the mirror is where it appears to be.

Cheers
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Old 03-07-20, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
Helmet or glasses mounted mirror allows you to see what's behind you whilst still being able to see traffic ahead of you. I like the Take-a-look mirror for use on my sunglasses. I also have a helmet mounted mirror I use sometimes. What I like about both of those is that they are NOT wide-angle and that means that the item you see in the mirror is where it appears to be.

Cheers
....I well understand what they are and used them a long time ago. There's still probably one around here in a drawer somewhere. I realized they serve no useful purpose for me when a bunch of cyclists here got hit from behind in rapid succession. In my conditions (on the local urban roads and down in the Delta), knowing there's some car approaching from the rear does nothing at all for me. If I pull over to the far right every time I see a car in the mirror, that's the only spot on the road I'd ever ride.

It does me absolutely no good to know a car is coming up behind me if I can't tell where it will be in the road when it passes me. It just serves as another distraction of some moving object I can't really do anything about.

If you like to use one, I'm not trying to dissuade you. I just don't get the point of them. If I want to change lanes, I'm going to do a head turn to look back anyway.
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