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Cargo bike for groceries/hauling

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Cargo bike for groceries/hauling

Old 04-03-22, 11:12 AM
  #1  
LarrySellerz
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Cargo bike for groceries/hauling

How many of yall have/use cargo bikes? Ive never ridden one, but a huge grocery trip can be a pain on a regular bike
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Old 04-03-22, 11:45 AM
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Trailer works for me. 2.5 mile to the store.
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Old 04-03-22, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by LarrySellerz View Post
How many of y’all have/use cargo bikes? I’ve never ridden one, but a huge grocery trip can be a pain on a regular bike
A regular bike can handle plenty of groceries or other cargo with a suitable trailer.
This regular bicycle -trailer combo cost a total of $15 at a garage sale and has served quite well for over a decade with no problems for short hauls around town.




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Old 04-05-22, 12:38 PM
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The question is also what you need to haul. You can carry a lot with a regular bike and a trailer as shown above. And old kids trailers are plenty and cheap to find on local classifieds. I have Burley Travoy trailer which which I tow behind my bike and use as a shopping cart inside the store and then just hook on to the bike. I have also built my own cargo bike from an older recumbent tandem bike. This one I use for the heavier loads.
There are quite a few different designs and styles of cargo bikes as well: Two wheelers, three wheelers, long tail bikes, Bakfiets, ... and I think everyone has a different demand on what a cargo bike should do.
I would visit a store which focuses on cargo bikes if you have one in the area to check what style would fit your needs. But be aware new ones can be expensive. And used ones can be hard to find depending where you live. I would probably start with a used trailer and check if that fits your need.
Below are one of my bikes with a trailer and the cargo bike I have built.



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Old 04-14-22, 08:26 PM
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My lightweight steel touring bike carries 40lbs easily in four panniers but starts getting noodley at 50lbs and beyond. My mountain bike and tandem can each handle about 10lbs more before getting interesting and are both better behaved when overloaded.

I have ridden a Bakfiets with my sister-in-law in the bucket and it handled that load excellently. I have never used one for groceries but It seems like it would be more convenient to just dump everything in the bucket of a Bakfiets than distribute the load to panniers.

I have never ridden a longtail cargo bike but am not convinced that it would be better in any way than a Bakfiets.
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Old 04-17-22, 09:39 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
Trailer works for me. 2.5 mile to the store.
You have a really cool setup. I like the reflective tape on all the wheels. Your trailer solves hauling just about anything except a piano. I like your overhead light bar. At least you should be able to see well at night.
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Old 04-17-22, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
A regular bike can handle plenty of groceries or other cargo with a suitable trailer.

This regular bicycle -trailer combo cost a total of $15 at a garage sale and has served quite well for over a decade with no problems for short hauls around town.







I really like your setup because it uses a bicycle and used trailer that are not hot theft items. Those older Chicago Schwinns are really durable and no one really wants them so good U locks will keep this in your possession. The trailer looks used so again the theft factor is much lower as long as you use a good lock. I find that going shopping at different times will keep thieves from planning their theft. I've lost bicycles that were locked up publicly with good locks that were in the same place every day at the same time. In the early 1980's I had a job in downtown Sacramento and lost a couple of bikes this way. Resorted to rollerskating to work as I only lived 2 miles away from work. I could store my skates in a locked locker in the work area as opposed to outside in a public area for the bicycles.
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Old 04-17-22, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Harhir View Post
The question is also what you need to haul. You can carry a lot with a regular bike and a trailer as shown above. And old kids trailers are plenty and cheap to find on local classifieds. I have Burley Travoy trailer which which I tow behind my bike and use as a shopping cart inside the store and then just hook on to the bike. I have also built my own cargo bike from an older recumbent tandem bike. This one I use for the heavier loads.
There are quite a few different designs and styles of cargo bikes as well: Two wheelers, three wheelers, long tail bikes, Bakfiets, ... and I think everyone has a different demand on what a cargo bike should do.
I would visit a store which focuses on cargo bikes if you have one in the area to check what style would fit your needs. But be aware new ones can be expensive. And used ones can be hard to find depending where you live. I would probably start with a used trailer and check if that fits your need.
Below are one of my bikes with a trailer and the cargo bike I have built.



Your converted tandem recumbent into a very nice cargo bike is a really good idea. I had to read you post to understand what it was. That bike looks like it can haul all the groceries for a couple of weeks. Again I am really impressed by your creativity. I own a Ryan Vanguard XL recumbent but it can't begin to haul all the stuff yours can.
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Old 04-24-22, 09:26 AM
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I used a Burley Nomad cargo trailer for many years. It was just fine for groceries/shopping/taking random stuff around town and for camping/touring. When my daughter came along, we bought a Douze F1/V2 cargo bike. It's amazing. Seriously, it's the best purchase of a material item I've ever made. Expensive, but worth it.


Douze F1
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Old 04-24-22, 09:02 PM
  #10  
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Your Douze is a very competent cargo hauling bike. I own a cycle truck bicycle with 26" rear wheel and 20" front wheel. A lot can be hauled on a cycle truck but your Dutch style cargo bike is even better. My cycle truck and your cargo bike both suffer from really being unable to put it on public transit. Lately I have seen some Dutch style cargo bikes with electric assist. I own a RAD City e-bike and it has been a real eye opener as to how real world useful an e-bike is. If I was to purchase another pure cargo bike I would opt to have it electric assist. I used my cycle truck for over 20 years then the frame broke. It saved us many gas buying dollars going grocery shopping over the years. Keep up the good work riding your great looking cargo bike.
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Old 04-29-22, 08:51 AM
  #11  
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I'd like something that will carry 2x4s or sheets of plywood from Home Depot.

Until I can do that, I'm limited to what I can squeeze into my Arkel backpack.
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