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Where to move too..........

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Where to move too..........

Old 08-17-10, 08:17 PM
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Where to move too..........

My wife and I would like to move away from STL, for a many a reasons, job market, allergies, humidity+100 degree summer days, but also it is not a bike commuter friendly town, we a have a few nice trails but we are not that good for the daily commute.

We are thinking about going West/North West.

Factors to consider.

I have a BS in Exercise Science/Sports Medicine. I/we need to find a $35k job at least for it to facilitate the move. Im sure that no one on here is going to be able to find me a job in my field, I was just stating it just in case

We need a drier climate at least as far as humidity. I dont mind rain I just cant take not being able to breath on a hot summer day with a 90% humidity.

We want a place that is not an allergy capitol of the world like STL is.

Also low crime, good schools and all else that goes along with raising children.

And most importantly, big on the bike friendliness.

I have "Googled" a bunch of articles about bike friendly towns and such, but I would rather here opinions on the subject from real people.

thanks
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Old 08-17-10, 09:17 PM
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Davis CA. you can ride pretty much 12 months a year. However the job market is maybe iffy.
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Old 08-17-10, 09:19 PM
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I would begin by looking for the job first to see what's out there. No use in looking for a town with bike lanes if you don't have a job! Once that is secure, I would look at the pubic transit options and see what bus or train can take you to your new job.

Living along a bus or rail stop will give you the option of biking or using public transit to your new job. Using transit to help you decide where to live can give you alot of alternatives in housing and schools. Too often, people choose the job then move 20 miles away to a town with no bus or rail service becoming car dependant the rest of their lives.
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Old 08-18-10, 11:10 AM
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Not all towns and cities have the same cost of living.

When we lived in Los Angeles, my partner earned about $60k/year. Rent for our 450sq ft dingy and ill maintained apartment was over $1000/mo. Now he earns a bit less, but our rent is also substantially less for a 750sq ft two bedroom, and our landlady is an unholy terror for maintaining her precious building. We have a lot more money to plow into savings. Food costs end up a bit lower here in Madison, tho a lot of that is we have gotten used to a more vegetarian diet.

When we made the decision to move, it took us a couple weeks to work out all the details involved so we were making reasonable comparisons. On paper, he was taking a pay cut. Thanks to the cost of living changes tho, it ended up being a very slight pay raise. That kind of stuff matters, since no matter how frugally you live, you're still going to have emergencies, time when one partner or another is out of work, or other unexpected stuff. You really need to have a realistic savings cushion that is in keeping with your values (not just your personal ones, but your partner's too).

As far as bike friendly... Madison is very bike friendly, but LA is a helluva lot better place to be car-free. I don't think it makes sense to value bike friendly over the practicalities of living without a car. On paper, Portland is really bike friendly... and if I lived there, I'd likely take mass transit far more than I'd bike.
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Old 08-18-10, 11:24 AM
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Orlando, FL. Move downtown - there are plentiful amounts of housing in the Winter Park and downtown area, as well as apartments and condos. Our healthcare area just keeps growing and you should be able to find a decent paying job in the physical therapy area if you are allowed to work in that. We do get our 80% humidity days though - it stays around 50% on average, however.
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Old 08-18-10, 12:38 PM
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Philadelphia is not spectacularly bike-friendly, but it's not bad either (lots of small streets that pre-date the automobile, and not many huge/fast streets).

Housing costs and job availability in Philly are also very reasonable. Philadelphia didn't have a lot of involvement in the housing bubble, the banking bubble (credit default swaps?) so we didn't lose much with the bubble burst.

There are dangerous places in philly, but there are affordable, bikeable, safe places too.
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Old 08-18-10, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Robert Foster
Davis CA. you can ride pretty much 12 months a year. However the job market is maybe iffy.
The person I once worked for at U.C. Davis used to leave every spring and go to Asia to avoid the allergy season. STL has nothing on the central valley for allergens. Add in the incredible summer smog and summer temps in the 100s and I don't think the OP will be happy in Davis. Also, even thought the infrastructure is still there, the area hasn't been bike friendly for decades. That said, there is a growing group of people trying to return Davis to its former glory; I hope they succeed.
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Old 08-18-10, 05:11 PM
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I think we would look at Colorado or the NW, mainly Washington or Oregon or Idaho, but florida sounds nice LOL
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Old 08-18-10, 10:33 PM
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I live is Scottsdale, AZ - and once upon a time we would have been the perfect candidate for you, but now I'm not too sure. The job market sucks, everyone here has the real estate blues, and the desert was once a place to move to to escape allergies, now people move here and get them from all of the landscaping.

Metro Phoenix might still be a good move though. If you are a home buyer you are sitting in the cat bird seat. CA, AZ, and NV crashed in real estate like no others. It's sickening if you're a seller, sweet if you're a buyer. We have over 300 days of sunshine a year... and I'm talking big huge yellow sun, no clouds sunshine. And we have made great strides in becoming bicycle friendly with 3 of our Metro Phoenix towns in the top 50 - and Tucson in the top 10.

In fact, I would just look into Tucson first. It's a University town with a far more grounded and healthy vibe than Phoenix IMO.

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Old 08-19-10, 11:07 AM
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Dayton OH. Pluses, low cost of living, very good suburban schools, small city easy to get around but with excellent arts for a small city, over 300 miles of bike trails, bronze level cycling city and working towards becoming a bronze level region. We have an active bike club and a rider friendly roads (rolling hills without knee breaking mountains, relatively wide streets in most areas and modest traffic). I would think someone with your degree would be able to find a job here. I wouldn't bother if I were unskilled as our manufacturing base has been decimated. Minuses, while weather would be better than St. Louis, (we had a hot humid summer but to a lesser degree than St. Louis, our winters are cold but relatively moderate, we average around 27" of snow per year from November through March) we're not San Diego. Dayton City schools like many inner city schools aren't much to get excited about (however, like I mentioned the suburban schools are some of the best in the state). Crime is high in certain areas of the city but average for most areas. Dayton has a bus system but I think it's public transportation system is wanting.

I have two kids and live in a suburb called Centerville. The schools here are tremendous and getting around by bike is relatively easy. Dayton doesn't have the cache of Portland or Seattle, however, it doesn't come with the cost either.

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Old 08-19-10, 02:41 PM
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Long Beach, CA is a good place for your needs. I am not mentioning this because I live here but it is a good city to go car free or car light. Nothing is really too far to travel within the city. It is in the middle between Los Angeles and coastal Orange Country with a multitude of bus lines and rails running all over the place. The city is diverse and is home to many fit people and the Long Beach Marathon. I am sure you can find a decent paying job here or start your own business.
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Old 08-19-10, 08:26 PM
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The people suggesting California must have grown up in Cali and never lived anywhere else. California is just way too expensive, even with the supposed real estate crash. I recommend Colorado. If you want to be able to bike everywhere, Denver or Boulder are good but keep in mind that it is more expensive than living out in the surrounding suburbs. The climate is pretty good - lots of sunshine. It can get a little cold in the winter but usually when it snows the next day the sun is shining and it doesn't seem all that cold. It's also a very athletic state and usually is the leanest state in the country so you should have a lot more job prospects there. Contrary to some others, I think it is easier to save money and go for it without finding a job first. I've done this a couple of times. It can get a little scary, but what's life without a little risk?
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Old 08-19-10, 08:48 PM
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I think transportation would be about 4th or 5th most important on my list. I would look for a town where I either had family or where I could soon join in a community of friends. Then probably employment opportunities.

I'd hesitate to move to Davis CA just because it's a great biking town. Where I currently live isn't considered by many to be a great biking town; despite that, you can pretty much bike wherever you want.
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Old 08-19-10, 11:26 PM
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Old 08-19-10, 11:39 PM
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Im leaning more and more towards NW, but CO still has a fighting chance, any thoughts on Colorado Springs?
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Old 08-28-10, 12:05 PM
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Lots and lots of military and retired military in Colorado Springs. Very Conservative town, right now they're on an austerity program of sorts in order to avoid having to raise taxes. Parks deparment was one of the first places that got their budget slashed to the bone. Nice enough climate, beautiful scenery, but not a fantastic town for bicyclists.


Minneapolis is a fantastic town for cyclists; I commute year 'round by bike, but I understand the winters here are a dealbreaker for a lot of folks.
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Old 08-28-10, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Captain Blight
Minneapolis is a fantastic town for cyclists; I commute year 'round by bike, but I understand the winters here are a dealbreaker for a lot of folks.
And yet Minneapolis has one of the largest percentages of year-round bike commuters in the US.
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Old 08-28-10, 05:54 PM
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Well the movin thoughts have been put off for a few weeks, looking into buying a bike shop about an hour away.

The isnt asking much and its in a great little town that actually has alot of bikers in it, and its the only shop in town and there isnt another one for 20 miles. he only wants $8k and that includes EVERYTHING
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Old 08-29-10, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Roody
And yet Minneapolis has one of the largest percentages of year-round bike commuters in the US.
That's amazing. And I gather Edmonton has a fair number, too, though I don't know about what fraction.

I'm encouraging my nephews to commute by bike through the winter. I'm giving them each a bike. One is in college in Ithaca, NY and the other is in Burlington, VT, both pretty cold and snowy places. My Lovely Wife™ and I are sending each bike with a pair of summer tires and a pair of winter tires.
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Old 08-30-10, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider
I'm encouraging my nephews to commute by bike through the winter. I'm giving them each a bike. One is in college in Ithaca, NY and the other is in Burlington, VT, both pretty cold and snowy places. My Lovely Wife™ and I are sending each bike with a pair of summer tires and a pair of winter tires.
That's cool. Wish I had an uncle like you. Winters tires are kind of expensive, but you should be able to get 3-5 winters out of them. If that's you biggest expense, they soon pay for themselves.
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Old 08-30-10, 11:05 PM
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I don't mean special winter tires. I mean regular knobbies. These are regular mountain bikes, so we're purchasing the summer tires.

Bikes are what I do best, so it's my gift, whenever appropriate.
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Old 08-31-10, 08:26 PM
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OK, what's STL??
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Old 08-31-10, 09:55 PM
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Originally Posted by kjmillig
OK, what's STL??
STL = St Louis, a large city in the heartland of America along the Mississippi River, home of the gateway arch.
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Old 08-31-10, 10:40 PM
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San Diego, CA. The first settlers of SD were actually doctors who promoted the city as a paradise for people with respiratory problems. At the time TB was a big problem and many people extended their lives by moving to SD. The cost of living is high but not nearly as much as LA. The cycling is excellent because of very high ridership and perfect year round weather. The city is the right size. Lots of jobs, lots of universities but you can also live outside of downtown and not feel like your in a big city. The beach areas are very bike friendly, as is hillcrest, normal heights, and south park.

I have asthma and chronic allergies. No problems at all in San Diego when I lived there for two years. Very dry climate.
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Old 09-01-10, 04:36 PM
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Originally Posted by zeppinger
San Diego, CA. The first settlers of SD were actually doctors who promoted the city as a paradise for people with respiratory problems. At the time TB was a big problem and many people extended their lives by moving to SD. The cost of living is high but not nearly as much as LA. The cycling is excellent because of very high ridership and perfect year round weather. The city is the right size. Lots of jobs, lots of universities but you can also live outside of downtown and not feel like your in a big city. The beach areas are very bike friendly, as is hillcrest, normal heights, and south park.

I have asthma and chronic allergies. No problems at all in San Diego when I lived there for two years. Very dry climate.
I lived in San Diego for a short time and I agree that it's a nice bike town. However, one problem is that you have to ride on high-speed arterial streets a lot. Due to the geography (especially the canyons and freeways) the city is divided into smaller neighborhoods that only have one FAST highway connecting the neighborhood to other areas in the city.
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