Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Living Car Free
Reload this Page >

Decisions, decisions...

Notices
Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

Decisions, decisions...

Old 10-03-12, 11:37 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Decisions, decisions...

A while back, I ventured into our local Trek retailer and they only had one bike for me to try. It was a nice youth mountain bike, but I thought I could do a bit better with my $500 budget, and since they only sold Trek, I felt kind of limited.

Now that I'm going car free, I finally sucked up the courage and went to a couple more LBSs. I called first and explained my predicament (being 4'8" but an adult woman, yada yada). When I walked in to the first shop, the owner took one look at me and told me I needed heels. They had nothing (not even youth bikes) that I could test ride.... When I called, they said they had a used bike that might fit me. It wasn't even close. They were pretty helpful, though, and willing to do some research/work with doing some custom work. I also kinda know one of the bike mechanics there and he was pretty nice.

The second store had two bikes ready and waiting for me when I walked in, but they don't do any servicing so I'd have to go elsewhere for tune-ups until I feel confident doing my own bike work. One of the bikes they showed me was the Felt Verza 1 and they were willing to sell it to me for $500. Here's the exact one:
https://www.suburbanbikes.com/collect...-1-womens-bike
I think it's pretty! I didn't really ask much about racks and fenders, because I just wasn't sure about this one (it's the second good-quality bike I've ever tried out). It was a tad heavy compared to the Trek bike I tried out, but it's still lighter than the dept. store crap I'm riding now. I liked the ride, but the gears are a little different than what I'm used to. It has suspension that I don't have to use, but I can also do some light trail riding which would be cool. The seat and handlebars were all the way down, and they could've been raised a bit which is pretty awesome considering my size. The reach was a bit further than what I'm used to, but my arms weren't locked.

The other bike that they pulled out for me was a little comfort commuter. It was VERY comfortable, easy to ride, and stylish. I would have FUN on this bike, but I don't think it would be fun to tow stuff along with me on it due to the weight of it. It wouldn't be the fastest bike in the world... then again, considering what I currently own, it is a fabulous bike. It would be very easy for me to control this bike at stoplights because I could step through. It was also considerably cheaper than the other one...
https://www.myjamis.com/SSP%20Applica...cat_grp=recr_1

There's still one more LBS that I haven't called or visited (every time I try, they're closed). Should I just make a decision based on those two bikes, or should I give the guy that said he'd work with me a chance and also get a hold of the last store on my list? Right now I'm leaning toward the Verza. How many bikes do you guys try out before you buy one? $500 is a lot of money for me to spend, and I'm afraid to make the wrong choice (I still have to buy lights, racks, waterproof bags, a helmet, etc).
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-03-12, 12:12 PM
  #2  
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Posts: 24,221
Liked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Neither bike shows fenders or rack in the pictures. Are they put on by the mfrs. or will they be added by the LBS? (Mfr. is usually better, but add-on could be OK too) Aree you sure they're including the fenders and rack in the out-the-door price? And are you sure they're selling the 2013 models as pictured? That's a great price on the Felt (minus $149)!

Personally, I would look around more, unless you're worried they'll sell that Felt real soon, and you really like it.

How hilly is it where you will be riding? Do you enjoy going fast?

PS--you can do light trail riding with most bikes. Suspension is not required.
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline  
Old 10-03-12, 12:29 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Calgary, AB
Posts: 393
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Something's fishy about the link to the Felt... they describe it as having an internal gear hub (which it doesn't have in the picture - you can tell by the rear derailleur) and a "lightweight fork", which typically doesn't mean suspension.

It kind of looks like a Verza Path 1 that they've mislabelled: Verza Path 1. The price makes more sense too - the City 1 is listed at $1659, so for your LBS to have it for $500 would be unheard of even for last year's model.

It also might be the Verza City 3. It's around the right price point, and you describe the step-through frame of the Jamis as being an advantage, while the Verza Path also has a step through frame.

Either way, I think the whatever-it-is Felt and the Jamis are both solid bikes, and it looks like they both have braze-ons for racks. For Florida, I wouldn't worry too much about the weight... though for that matter, they both seem over-geared for a flat environment. Also, a heavy bike can make carrying a load *easier* - it prevents it from being as top-heavy when you put stuff in racks.

Do you have the option of exchanging/returning within a week or so? It's so hard to get a feel for whether a bike fits right with just a 10 minute test ride at the shop, and I would say that that's the most important thing.

P.S. Congrats on braving the scary neighbourhood and ditching the car!
charbucks is offline  
Old 10-03-12, 12:51 PM
  #4  
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,851
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
I'm confused about the Felt. As others noted, it says 8 speed internal and shows a derailleur. I'd avoid the front suspension on a street bike. It's extra weight and something more to go wrong and front suspensions tend to eat up your effort when climbing a hill. They actually make it more difficult. I'd be okay with the suspended seat post on the Jamis though.

The fenders and rack should fit, the Felt site mentions them. I didn't see a note on the Jamis page, but there was an eyelet in the back. You can mount both fender and rack to one eyelet, but you need a long screw.
__________________
"He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

Originally Posted by Bjforrestal
I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.
Artkansas is offline  
Old 10-03-12, 02:24 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Artkansas
I'm confused about the Felt. As others noted, it says 8 speed internal and shows a derailleur. I'd avoid the front suspension on a street bike. It's extra weight and something more to go wrong and front suspensions tend to eat up your effort when climbing a hill. They actually make it more difficult. I'd be okay with the suspended seat post on the Jamis though.

The fenders and rack should fit, the Felt site mentions them. I didn't see a note on the Jamis page, but there was an eyelet in the back. You can mount both fender and rack to one eyelet, but you need a long screw.
You guys are right. The picture is of the correct bike, though. That's exactly what it look like. It's the Verza Path 1. I was trying to find an exact picture of what I rode because I couldn't tell on Felt's website which one it was based on those weird graphic pictures... Here, found one on the 2012 website:
https://2012.feltracing.com/USA/2012/...-1-Womens.aspx

Ok, that aside, I don't think I want something extra that would have to be fixed. The Jamis bike is way easier to step through than the Felt. The seat will be down a lot further than in the pictures. It sounds like more and more that I should go with the Jamis of these two.

Originally Posted by Rudy
Neither bike shows fenders or rack in the pictures. Are they put on by the mfrs. or will they be added by the LBS? (Mfr. is usually better, but add-on could be OK too) Aree you sure they're including the fenders and rack in the out-the-door price? And are you sure they're selling the 2013 models as pictured? That's a great price on the Felt (minus $149)!

Personally, I would look around more, unless you're worried they'll sell that Felt real soon, and you really like it.

How hilly is it where you will be riding? Do you enjoy going fast?

PS--you can do light trail riding with most bikes. Suspension is not required.
No, they aren't including the racks and fenders in that price.

Yes, this is Florida, but there are some hills here and there. There's one big one right by my house that I have a bit of a huff and puff to get up. There are some rolling hills that I could ride to if I decided to go get ice cream on the other side of town. Hmm.... going fast? I like to, but it's not a huge priority. I like to get to a steady speed that doesn't require heavy breathing to just get to school, but if I'm riding for fun, I like to push myself and go faster. I don't mind getting to school in 30 minutes (it's 3 miles from my house).

I know it's a great price on the Felt... I just am not sure that I'm sold on either bike. How great should you feel about a bike? I think I'll just keep looking for a bit longer.

As far as the bike being lightweight, I'd rather not have a heavy bike because I may choose to store it upstairs in my apartment from time to time. Me having to lift a 40lb bike over my shoulder is rather awkward. I have a street level entrance with a foyer, and there's room for the bike there, but I don't want to always have the space crowded when I have people over.

Thanks for the comments. You guys are always so helpful.
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-03-12, 02:32 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Looks like the Citizen 1 will be about $350. That's a pretty big difference in price between the two... Much easier on the eyes. I really would love to stay under $500 total. I think I'm talking myself out of the Felt.
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 06:39 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Now this looks appealing:

https://lakeland.craigslist.org/bik/3284770026.html

I have no idea if it will even remotely fit me though...
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 08:58 AM
  #8  
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Posts: 24,221
Liked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by chgurlsng
Now this looks appealing:

https://lakeland.craigslist.org/bik/3284770026.html

I have no idea if it will even remotely fit me though...
Unless you're wealthy enough to throw the money away, do not buy a bike without test riding it extensively.
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 09:36 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Roody
Unless you're wealthy enough to throw the money away, do not buy a bike without test riding it extensively.
Yes, I'll be test riding it this afternoon, but I don't want to be riding all over town test riding bikes that I know before hand won't fit at all. I also have no idea how much money or effort it would be to fix the bottom bracket since I don't really have any mechanical experience. My current bike has a 14-15" stem depending on how I measure it, and the seat is up a bit because it's a youth bike. It's the reach I'm a bit concerned about. I'm used to having my arms bent more than slightly, but not over bent, so I'm not really sure how far my arms should really extend. I guess that has to do with personal comfort. Of course I don't want my arms locked, but some bikes I've ridden, they're not locked, but it's kind of uncomfortable. KWIM? Ah, that weird middle ground of bike fit...
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 09:38 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Smallwheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: I'm in Helena Montana again.
Posts: 1,402
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
After years of experience buying things like bicycles, cars, motorcycles, and musical equipment, I've come to notice that the best purchases are the ones where I have a good feeling about the thing. If I can look at it and feel a certain knowingness that this is the one, then I'll get it. If I don't get that feeling then the item will be useful but not outstanding. My last car was one of those purchases where I had to have one and it was the best of the group; but none of the choices were outstanding. It was more of a utility purchase instead of a big desire to own that particular model. Fortunately it had a high resale value and I got most of my money back when I didn't need it anymore.

I've gotten that good vibe from used items too. So do consider used things too if you are OK with that.
Smallwheels is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 09:53 AM
  #11  
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Posts: 24,221
Liked 13 Times in 13 Posts
I always buy used bikes. I prefer them, in general. For beginners who have plenty of money, I might reccommend a new bike.

You should know a little about bikes to buy a used one. I can think of a couple pointers off the top of my head.
  1. Make sure the frame is straight with absolutely no cracks or pitting.
  2. If the tires show wear, don't buy the bike unless it's very cheap.
  3. Don't buy if mechanical parts (incl. the bottom bracket) need to be replaced.
  4. Don't buy if the brakes or gears are messed up, unless you happen to have a replacement available.
  5. If they won't let you take an extensive test ride over varying conditions, walk away.
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 11:44 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Roody
I always buy used bikes. I prefer them, in general. For beginners who have plenty of money, I might reccommend a new bike.

You should know a little about bikes to buy a used one. I can think of a couple pointers off the top of my head.
  1. Make sure the frame is straight with absolutely no cracks or pitting.
  2. If the tires show wear, don't buy the bike unless it's very cheap.
  3. Don't buy if mechanical parts (incl. the bottom bracket) need to be replaced.
  4. Don't buy if the brakes or gears are messed up, unless you happen to have a replacement available.
  5. If they won't let you take an extensive test ride over varying conditions, walk away.
Great advice! You guys are so invaluable. I think you're right-- I don't want to buy something that I'm going to immediately have to throw more money at. The guy who is selling this bike is head of the local bike co-op, though, and could probably help me fix it. I just don't have the time being a student and all.
I'm car-free as of tomorrow (rental is up) and I don't wanna ride the piece of crap that I have now. I've been watching CL for two weeks which is not a long time, but seems like forever when my breaks squeal and gears make a horrid churning noise... I think I'm going to have to buy new due to my size. There are some great bikes on there, but they're all way too big.
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 12:27 PM
  #13  
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Posts: 24,221
Liked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by chgurlsng
my breaks squeal and gears make a horrid churning noise...
These sounds possibly could be fixed with some very simple adjustment, proper lubrication. and maybe a cheap set of brake pads. Check with the bike co-op, or get a bike repair book at the library and check it yourself. Ten dollars and a couple hours of your time could make the wait for a new bike more tolerable.
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 01:34 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 489

Bikes: '74 Schwinn Le Tour (x2), '83 Bianchi, '96 Trek 820, '96 Trek 470, '99 Xmart Squishy Bike, '03 Giant Cypress

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I agree with Roody. New brake pads (with proper adjustment) and some lube may buy you some time.

If it's a bigger problem, and you need to buy something ASAP, then don't let yourself get paralyzed by choices. No offense, but at your budget any of the new bikes are going to be close enough quality-wise to not really matter. Get a style and size that suits your needs/budget and go for it. Don't forget lights, a pump, and a spare tube will be needed... at a bare minimum. Helmet, lock, and a patch kit should come along as soon as possible, too (if you are inclined to wear a helmet... I'm not preaching, or anything).

In the used market you can probably do significantly better, but as you are realizing, it takes a bit of leg-work.
Wolfwerx is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 03:53 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Calgary, AB
Posts: 393
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by chgurlsng
I've been watching CL for two weeks which is not a long time, but seems like forever when my breaks squeal and gears make a horrid churning noise... I think I'm going to have to buy new due to my size. There are some great bikes on there, but they're all way too big.
I had the same problem, and I'm 5'3". I lucked out on a pretty sweet kid's road bike, which was listed for $20 but the guy I bought it from refused to let me pay more than $10 (reverse bargaining?). It looked like this:


I changed the handlebars for a more upright posture, and now it looks like this:


If you can find something like this, I think it'd be pretty perfect. I use it for pretty much everything, unless I need to go up big hills. The one issue with my little Apollo is the steel wheels - braking in the rain is pretty much impossible. I keep meaning to go to the local bike kitchen and try to scrounge something aluminum.

Speaking of which, have you been to your local bike co-op? They may well have all kinds of bikes just waiting for owners, or bike pieces waiting for builders.
charbucks is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 04:00 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Oh, me oh my... Spelling BRAKE wrong. Homophones.... Oh, Firefox spell check.

Originally Posted by Wolfwerx
I agree with Roody. New brake pads (with proper adjustment) and some lube may buy you some time.

If it's a bigger problem, and you need to buy something ASAP, then don't let yourself get paralyzed by choices. No offense, but at your budget any of the new bikes are going to be close enough quality-wise to not really matter. Get a style and size that suits your needs/budget and go for it. Don't forget lights, a pump, and a spare tube will be needed... at a bare minimum. Helmet, lock, and a patch kit should come along as soon as possible, too (if you are inclined to wear a helmet... I'm not preaching, or anything).

In the used market you can probably do significantly better, but as you are realizing, it takes a bit of leg-work.
I put some break pads on the bike already and attempted to align everything better, but I think the wheel might be ever so slightly bent. Everything does need to be oiled up, though.

Went to another LBS today and they had nothing.

You're not going to offend me about the money... I don't want to spend a whole lot and then have it stolen. The bike will be locked up at school a lot, and this is a pretty shady area. I am noticing that there's a difference between a $500 middle of the road youth bike and a $500 entry level tiny adult bike, though. The Trek bike I tried seemed to be the best I've seen so far, and I think it's because it was a youth bike. I think I'm going to go over there tomorrow because they might have a 2012 model on sale (since it seems all the local stores are getting new inventory). I would love to wait around for a great used bike, but I'm really not sure if one will ever come along. A lot of people buy their kids cheapo dept. store bikes until they're grown.

Last edited by chgurlsng; 10-04-12 at 04:07 PM.
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-04-12, 10:05 PM
  #17  
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,851
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by chgurlsng
I've been watching CL for two weeks which is not a long time, but seems like forever when my brakes squeal.
I actually like the brake squeal. Driver's hear it.
__________________
"He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

Originally Posted by Bjforrestal
I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.
Artkansas is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 05:05 AM
  #18  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Finding bikes for vertically challenged people is a....challenge.

My bride is 5'-2" (so she claims ) and has short legs. Two of her favorite bikes are her Raleigh Colts (vintage) and a Huffy single speed cruiser with 24" wheels. She also rides a Raleigh Twenty (also vintage). I don't recommend vintage bikes unless you are willing to work on them, or have someone who will for a reasonable price. Too many bike shops these days aren't vintage friendly.

Lots of options out there, for now I would go with what is comfortable and feels good. Fenders, racks and lights can be added to just about anything. Folders are great bikes too, you can take them inside with you and not have to worry about them being locked up. They are hard to find for test riding.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 08:05 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by charbucks
I had the same problem, and I'm 5'3". I lucked out on a pretty sweet kid's road bike, which was listed for $20 but the guy I bought it from refused to let me pay more than $10 (reverse bargaining?). It looked like this:


I changed the handlebars for a more upright posture, and now it looks like this:


If you can find something like this, I think it'd be pretty perfect. I use it for pretty much everything, unless I need to go up big hills. The one issue with my little Apollo is the steel wheels - braking in the rain is pretty much impossible. I keep meaning to go to the local bike kitchen and try to scrounge something aluminum.

Speaking of which, have you been to your local bike co-op? They may well have all kinds of bikes just waiting for owners, or bike pieces waiting for builders.
WOW, I didn't notice your post before. That is a beauty. If only...

I've contacted the bike co-op and they didn't really respond to my Facebook post. In fact, that bike that I linked to from Craigslist is from the bike co-op. They are a mobile co-op and only open about once a month. They just tweeted that they're open tomorrow, though, but I already have plans. Sad. The Tampa one looks amazing, but it's too far.

Would love to own a vintage bike.... but it seems I can barely find anything new/used within this decade that I'm in love with or even remotely interested in.

Oh, and the brakes on my current bike dangerously squeal. If it was just noise, it wouldn't bother me, but the whole bike shimmies when I brake. I have to lightly tap the brakes over and over to stop properly. I know they need better adjustment, but I don't know how to do it, and I don't have time to take it in to the bike store (it'll be there for several days because they're backed up).

There's a folder on Craigslist but it's about 20 miles away. Aaaah, how do car-free people look for bikes?
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 09:14 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Smallwheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: I'm in Helena Montana again.
Posts: 1,402
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by chgurlsng
Aaaah, how do car-free people look for bikes?
Three of the last four I've bought came from the internet.

How do you feel about regular cranks? Aren't the standard 170 mm cranks too long for you? I would prefer shorter crank arms but most of them are the longer length.

Look at my bike in my signature. I wonder if it would fit you with the seat post all the way down.
Smallwheels is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 09:57 AM
  #21  
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,851
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by chgurlsng
Aaaah, how do car-free people look for bikes?
Well, let's see. Of the bikes I have, One I got by trading a friend a load of wood for a bicycle, two were freebies, I bought one over the Internet, and I bought one at the local LBS.

Your problem is that you are buying in crisis mode. Ironically, bikes seem more available when you don't need them. Sometimes you get rides from friends, I even rented a car one day to go buy a bicycle, and I was 1,700 miles from home when I bought the one from the LBS, I had test ridden it a month or two previously, and it was all prepped and accessorized when I returned from my trip.


And the brake shimmies, yes you need a different set of brakes or a better bike. I only experience that on cheap bikes where the brakes just aren't stiff enough to not flex when they are clamped to the rims.
__________________
"He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

Originally Posted by Bjforrestal
I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.
Artkansas is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 10:09 AM
  #22  
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Posts: 24,221
Liked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by wahoonc
Finding bikes for vertically challenged people is a....challenge.

My bride is 5'-2" (so she claims ) and has short legs. Two of her favorite bikes are her Raleigh Colts (vintage) and a Huffy single speed cruiser with 24" wheels. She also rides a Raleigh Twenty (also vintage). I don't recommend vintage bikes unless you are willing to work on them, or have someone who will for a reasonable price. Too many bike shops these days aren't vintage friendly.

Lots of options out there, for now I would go with what is comfortable and feels good. Fenders, racks and lights can be added to just about anything. Folders are great bikes too, you can take them inside with you and not have to worry about them being locked up. They are hard to find for test riding.

Aaron
You made me curious. How would a BMX bike be for someone like the OP?
__________________

"Think Outside the Cage"
Roody is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 01:42 PM
  #23  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Roody
You made me curious. How would a BMX bike be for someone like the OP?
Might work. Years ago GT used to sell a BMX bike with a 5 speed freewheel in the back. That was my daughter's first bike with gears at age 7. I have not seen any bikes like that in the stores in recent years. If the OP were closer to the New York city area I would suggest getting down to AdelineAdeline and test riding a Bobbin Shopper. I can just about guarantee it would fit and is in the price range.

Here is a picture of our Twentys. The one with about a mile of seat post out is the one I ride. I am 6'-2" with a 35" inseam, I typically ride 25" (64cm) road frames, or XL in today's sizing. My bride is a full 12"+ shorter than I am.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 03:22 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wahoonc
Might work. Years ago GT used to sell a BMX bike with a 5 speed freewheel in the back. That was my daughter's first bike with gears at age 7. I have not seen any bikes like that in the stores in recent years. If the OP were closer to the New York city area I would suggest getting down to AdelineAdeline and test riding a Bobbin Shopper. I can just about guarantee it would fit and is in the price range.
OH MY WORD the bobbin shopper is ADORABLE. Forgive me for my teeny bopper freak out moment. I wanna go to New York now.

Smallwheels, the Dahon does look pretty sweet. My inseam is about 25". Do you think this could work?
chgurlsng is offline  
Old 10-05-12, 05:03 PM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Calgary, AB
Posts: 393
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Smallwheels
How do you feel about regular cranks? Aren't the standard 170 mm cranks too long for you? I would prefer shorter crank arms but most of them are the longer length.
My road bike has 170s, my Surly LHT has 165s, and I have no idea what that little Apollo has. The only real issue with the 170s on the road bike is when I'm in the drops, my knees hit my ribcage when I pedal. I can't tell the difference otherwise.

Edit: I should clarify that I'm sharing my experiences, not answering on behalf of the OP I would guess that for a more upright posture, crank length doesn't make that much difference.

Last edited by charbucks; 10-05-12 at 05:08 PM.
charbucks is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.