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Chain Grease And Pants Should Not Play Together

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Chain Grease And Pants Should Not Play Together

Old 10-22-13, 06:30 PM
  #26  
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Wondering if anyone has figured a way to get chain tattoos out of your clothing. I have a nasty one in a pair of pants and I've tried everything from hand cleaner to Shout... and nothing helped. I believe I may even have tried adding a little bleach.
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Old 10-22-13, 10:05 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
Wondering if anyone has figured a way to get chain tattoos out of your clothing. I have a nasty one in a pair of pants and I've tried everything from hand cleaner to Shout... and nothing helped. I believe I may even have tried adding a little bleach.
GOOP; brand name for an inexpensive waterless hand cleaner. Rub it into stain, let sit for several minutes, wash as normal clothes. Presto! GoneO!
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Old 10-22-13, 10:08 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Roody View Post


I kind of like the idea of having a bike that's dedicated (devoted?) only to spiritual purposes. It also seems to fit in with the Judaic tradition of special garments used only for worship.

A $89 bike ridden only 2 miles a week would last a hundred years with almost no maintenance... Like the used car owned by the little old lady in Pasadena.
Exactly! Chaining it up outside at home might cut the bike life down to 50 years.
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Old 10-22-13, 10:09 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Artkansas View Post
At least you amuse yourself, I'm thankful for that.
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Old 10-22-13, 10:21 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
Anyone have any advice for summer riding in shorts? My right leg looks like the Second World War.
Train yourself to put your right foot down when you stop, and use clipless pedals or at least cages and straps to your foot doesn't stray inward.

Spring trouser clips, either in plastic or chromed steel, are still sold for long pants. Otherwise, fold gently and put the cuffs of the trousers into the tops of your socks. Mid-calf-length socks are good because they also cover the area where most encounter with chainrings occurs. Folding away the cuffs and stuffing them into the socks also prevents the cuffs from catching on the cranks on either side, as well as water bottle cages.

And if you have chain grease already on the pant leg, use diesel, and dab the stain out, don't rub. Then wash after putting a generous dollop of clothes detergent on the area.
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Old 10-23-13, 04:40 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
Wondering if anyone has figured a way to get chain tattoos out of your clothing. I have a nasty one in a pair of pants and I've tried everything from hand cleaner to Shout... and nothing helped. I believe I may even have tried adding a little bleach.
I've never had an overnight soak with warm water and Dawn fail me.
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Old 10-23-13, 07:54 AM
  #32  
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Just roll up your pant leg or tuck it into your sock. Think about it this way: walking around with a rolled up pant leg you forgot to unroll is still a BILLION times cooler than walking around as a fat tub of lard like the vast majority of motorists do!
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Old 10-23-13, 08:39 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
Wondering if anyone has figured a way to get chain tattoos out of your clothing. I have a nasty one in a pair of pants and I've tried everything from hand cleaner to Shout... and nothing helped. I believe I may even have tried adding a little bleach.
Have you tried WD-40?

Of course by now, you may have truly impressed the dirt into them.
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Old 10-23-13, 05:44 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
GOOP; brand name for an inexpensive waterless hand cleaner. Rub it into stain, let sit for several minutes, wash as normal clothes. Presto! GoneO!
Originally Posted by kookaburra1701 View Post
I've never had an overnight soak with warm water and Dawn fail me.
Originally Posted by Artkansas View Post
Have you tried WD-40?
Have tried all these except WD-40. That would be my last resort or I might be willing to live with the tattoo.

Dawn has a degreasing agent, as does Simple Green and GOOP. What I haven't tried is leaving the degreaser on overnight. Even the GOOP manufacturers recommend leaving overnight before washing.
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Old 10-23-13, 08:22 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
Have tried all these except WD-40. That would be my last resort or I might be willing to live with the tattoo.

Dawn has a degreasing agent, as does Simple Green and GOOP. What I haven't tried is leaving the degreaser on overnight. Even the GOOP manufacturers recommend leaving overnight before washing.
GOOP has worked for me with a 5 minute wait before throwing in the washer. But if that doesn't work for your stains perhaps leaving on overnight will work better.
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Old 10-24-13, 12:47 AM
  #36  
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Here are some of the solutions I was talking about:

Reflective bands and plastic clips:


Reflective band on the leg. Note how the trouser leg is folded outwards. I also have Velcro straps like these, but they tend to flap in the wind:


The plastic clip. I am not quite as enamoured with these because they feel uncomfortable around my leg:


Trouser leg tucked into sock, and again note how the fold goes:


An oft-forgotten and permanent solution -- a chainring guard. This LX crankset came with one. You can find them, but rarely are they supplied with the crankset, except for cheap bikes. On my fixed gear, I created one by nipping the teeth off a larger outer chainring and smoothing off with a file.
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Old 10-24-13, 05:27 AM
  #37  
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Wear grease coloured pants?

I really don't have this problem, all but a couple of my bikes are equipped with chain guards or chain cases.

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Old 10-24-13, 11:52 AM
  #38  
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I used to use a tiny bungee cord, but it was uncomfortable. It also didn't work for the recumbent (which I admittedly don't ride much these days). I then switched to sticking my pants in my sock. I later bought a Leg Shield ($20 or so on Amazon) because it works with the 'bent. I still usually just tuck into my sock when riding an upright bike.

I recently acquired a tandem, and decided to ride it to work solo today. I dutifully stuck my pants in my sock. After arriving I realized I tucked my right pant leg in - and the tandem only has a chain on the left side on the captain's crank. Oops.
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Old 10-24-13, 11:55 AM
  #39  
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You could also get a pair of half-chaps - cheap ones are usually around $30.



And if you forget to take them off, you'll just look like you're wearing tall boots. And they'll keep water out of your shoes.
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Old 10-24-13, 12:22 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by kookaburra1701 View Post
You could also get a pair of half-chaps - cheap ones are usually around $30.



And if you forget to take them off, you'll just look like you're wearing tall boots. And they'll keep water out of your shoes.
Don't know if I'm fabulous enough to pull off a look like that
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Old 10-24-13, 09:16 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by kookaburra1701 View Post
You could also get a pair of half-chaps - cheap ones are usually around $30.



And if you forget to take them off, you'll just look like you're wearing tall boots. And they'll keep water out of your shoes.
I'd rather wear grease stained pants when cycling, thank you.
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Old 10-25-13, 08:36 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by kookaburra1701 View Post
You could also get a pair of half-chaps - cheap ones are usually around $30.



And if you forget to take them off, you'll just look like you're wearing tall boots. And they'll keep water out of your shoes.
that saddle looks a little low
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Old 10-26-13, 08:37 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by anthonybkny View Post
that saddle looks a little low

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Old 10-26-13, 09:01 AM
  #44  
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Try a hiking gaiter. In the summer I use a Mountain Hardwear Men's Ascent Stretch Air Perm Gaiter because it is much cooler than my winter gaiters.

If the problem is just with the area of your pants below the shine, then you can use a lower gaiter.

Many gaiters designed for winter use have an area of protective cloth on the inside ankle area to protect against tears and abrasions from ice spikes and crampons, so they certainly should hold up to an occasional brush with a bike chain.
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Old 10-27-13, 07:58 PM
  #45  
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If the straps, cuffs or chainguard don't float your boat, here's an alternative recipe:

1. Go to the used goods store (Goodwill or whatever), purchase a small pot, a small crock pot and some wax.
2. Remove your chain and thoroughly clean it by shaking it in warm water containing detergent. Any plastic bottle that seals will do, even a yogurt container. Do the final rinses in water to remove any excess detergent.
3. Boil the chain in the small pot (see step 1) twice. After the final draining, heat on very low to drive off any residual water.
4. Melt about a pound of paraffin wax in the crock pot. Turn the heat to low and add the chain. (The first time this is done, leave it in there for an hour or so. Subsequent waxings can be as short as five minutes.) Stir occasionally. (I put the quick links on a bent spoke and then add the chain to it and stir by grabbing the end of the spoke and whirling it around. Use a hot pad to handle the spoke.)
5. Turn off the crock pot and allow the wax to cool enough to handle the chain. Remove the chain, wipe off excess wax, replace it on the bike and you are good to go. (Spin the cranks backwards to remove the wax that solidified in the links. Do this outside, it can leave lots of tiny wax chunks on the ground.)

When the chain starts squeaking (anywhere from 200-1000 miles), wipe it off, remove it from the bike and repeat steps 4 and 5.

Leave the wax in the crock pot for future waxings. It will last for many uses before it is too nasty to reuse.

If you are willing to accept a little grease, you can add some Slick 50 to the wax (one-quarter ounce to two ounces per pound of wax). The more you add, the longer the waxing lasts but the dirtier it is. If you want the same performance without the Slick 50, you can get some graphite at the car parts store and do the fun, messy dance involved in getting that stuff into the rollers. You'll have to look that one up. You can also use teflon, if you can find it.

Once a chain has had the grease removed from it, waxing takes less time than "conventional" lubrication. You just turn on the crock pot, wait a bit for the wax to melt, put the chain in, come back to stir it once or twice, and put it back on the bike. This only happens once in a while (I've had chains go for over 2000 miles between treatments and have heard of folk in drier climates getting over twice that), so it's not a constant chore.
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Old 10-27-13, 09:11 PM
  #46  
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Some may consider me anal, but I'm not a fan of ankle straps or sticking pants inside of socks. Luckily I have a family member who works with steel. He was generous enough to custom make a chain guard for my mountain bike.

I have another bike that I bought used. The previous owner added a chain guard made by SKS. http://amzn.to/1gU1lDA

The bike was originally a 21-speed, but apparently the three sprockets in the front weren't compatible with the SKS chain guard. The owner ended up switching from three sprockets in the front to two sprockets, effectively converting the bike to a 14-speed. No more stained pants. No more need for pant straps or rolling up pant legs.

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Old 05-25-14, 09:25 AM
  #47  
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Erikami Trouser Straps

Hi. I'm an athletic apparels designer and designed the Erikami trouser straps. It's made to hold the trouser legs to reduce oil/dirt from the chain from getting on your trouser. Of course, your chain should always have clean oil, meaning that you should wipe it down and lube with new oil once in a while. The trouser straps also prevent your trouser from getting caught on the chain or other parts around that area of the bike. I commute to work daily and wear them everyday. They cuff on quickly and can be removed in less than a second. Here's the link to my site if you're interested in getting one. erikami_bikingapparel on eBay

I hope this helps! I'm here to help the cycling community anyway I can.

Eric


Originally Posted by Blue_Bulldog View Post
With Eastern NC officially moving into "Pants Weather", I have entered the conundrum of keeping my right pant leg free of chain grease marks. It's a pain.

I had a roommate who would roll his right pant leg way up like how rap dudes used to do. I'm not into that, and I am positive I'd forget to roll it back down and end up looking like a complete tool.

I usually ride in jeans, but when I ride to synagogue, I'm in khakis or slacks that would be nice if they didn't have chain grease on them. Kinda not a good look walking into a house of worship with chain grease on your leg. Not to mention, changing clothes AT Temple?? Kind of frowned upon. It's in the Talmud somewhere... near the back, I think.

What is an EASY way to keep chain grease off of my pant legs? An easy, cheap, hopefully DIY/Life Hack method to keep my favorite jeans from looking like a hot mess.
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Old 05-25-14, 09:58 AM
  #48  
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If the REI reflective straps are insufficient, get a pair of lightweight gaiters. They will help with dirty wet roads too.
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Old 05-25-14, 12:56 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
If the straps, cuffs or chainguard don't float your boat, here's an alternative recipe:

1. Go to the used goods store (Goodwill or whatever), purchase a small pot, a small crock pot and some wax.
2. Remove your chain and thoroughly clean it by shaking it in warm water containing detergent. Any plastic bottle that seals will do, even a yogurt container. Do the final rinses in water to remove any excess detergent.
3. Boil the chain in the small pot (see step 1) twice. After the final draining, heat on very low to drive off any residual water.
4. Melt about a pound of paraffin wax in the crock pot. Turn the heat to low and add the chain. (The first time this is done, leave it in there for an hour or so. Subsequent waxings can be as short as five minutes.) Stir occasionally. (I put the quick links on a bent spoke and then add the chain to it and stir by grabbing the end of the spoke and whirling it around. Use a hot pad to handle the spoke.)
5. Turn off the crock pot and allow the wax to cool enough to handle the chain. Remove the chain, wipe off excess wax, replace it on the bike and you are good to go. (Spin the cranks backwards to remove the wax that solidified in the links. Do this outside, it can leave lots of tiny wax chunks on the ground.)

When the chain starts squeaking (anywhere from 200-1000 miles), wipe it off, remove it from the bike and repeat steps 4 and 5.

Leave the wax in the crock pot for future waxings. It will last for many uses before it is too nasty to reuse.

If you are willing to accept a little grease, you can add some Slick 50 to the wax (one-quarter ounce to two ounces per pound of wax). The more you add, the longer the waxing lasts but the dirtier it is. If you want the same performance without the Slick 50, you can get some graphite at the car parts store and do the fun, messy dance involved in getting that stuff into the rollers. You'll have to look that one up. You can also use teflon, if you can find it.

Once a chain has had the grease removed from it, waxing takes less time than "conventional" lubrication. You just turn on the crock pot, wait a bit for the wax to melt, put the chain in, come back to stir it once or twice, and put it back on the bike. This only happens once in a while (I've had chains go for over 2000 miles between treatments and have heard of folk in drier climates getting over twice that), so it's not a constant chore.
That's a lot of hassle. I just use a commercial wax type chain lube. It cleans as well as lubes, and it sets up dry so you don't have the tattooing problem.

I never have to remove the chain. It just takes a few seconds to dribble some lube on it, about once a week. The cost is $5 at a discount store or $7 at the LBS for a little squeeze bottle that lasts a few months.

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Old 05-25-14, 05:33 PM
  #50  
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I suggest a chaincase. I ride with a full chaincase and never have to worry about my clothes. I also rarely have to maintain the chain as it's sealed and protected from dirt and the weather. This only works on single speed or IGH bikes. If you have a derailleur system then a chain guard is your next best bet.



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