Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

2017 Century-A-Month Club

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Old 11-05-17, 09:54 AM
  #51  
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I rode 189 km with 2200 m of elevation gain for a 'koyo' (autumn leaves viewing) ride in the mountains of Chichibu west of Tokyo. It's a 90+ km loop I've done every first November weekend since 2012, except last year when I was down with influenza. After the loop through the mountains I rode another 6 hours back to Tokyo after sunset.

The evening before the ride I left Tokyo just before sunset and rode out to Chichibu to stay at a hotel for the night. Otherwise I would have had to use a train either on the way to the ride or on the way home or make it a 270 km mountain ride.

Unlike my Bike Friday, the Elephant Bikes NFE doesn't easily pack for train rides. At the very least I'd have to remove the front rack and its attached dynamo headlight to fit into a standard size 'rinko' bag to take it on a Japanese train, which I've only ever done once. Staying at the hotel I could sleep in and have a nice breakfast before the ride.

At a quarter to 9 in the morning I met up at Seibu-Chichibu station with my friend Jack. He's a faster rider than me, but as he explained, his longest rides these days are 30+ km commutes. His goal with the 90+ km mountain loop was simply to finish it. I do long rides, but consistently slow. I take pride only in distance and I ride for views.

The weather was perfect. Blue sky and cool but not cold. I wore lined long trousers and a short sleeve polyester jersey. The lined trousers had kept me comfortable on the night ride on the way from Tokyo and I was worried they might be too warm for the sunny daytime ride, but they weren't. It was just right. I rode in my short sleeves t-shirt all the way to the 1250-odd m elevation high point of the loop, then put on a jacket and wind breaker for the descent. After the steep part of the descent I could again remove my jacket until sunset.



Jack and I stopped many times for pictures - I took over 160 of them. When we were riding flat roads or mild inclines I kept the pace up, but on the climb I made sure we could still effortlessly keep up a conversation. This was a slower pace than Jack had done on the course with others in previous years and he loved it. It let him experience it in a totally different way.

Once we got to the top of the small road we descended together on the other side until the road joined the major road. There's a fair amount of debris on the forest road from rock slides and cyclists often puncture there. Jack told me, in all the times he had done this course, he had punctured in all rides but one! Well, this time was the second time he made it back safely We descended separately on the main road to meet up again half an hour later at the first convenience store. It was late afternoon by then. I loved the soft evening light as we rode back to the station together. He headed back towards Tokyo by train, while I cycled another 90 km or so in moonlight to get home.

Winters in Tokyo are mostly dry and sunny, with temperatures rarely dropping to the freezing point. At lower elevations we only get a couple of days of snow, usually in February. As long as you dress for the temperatures you can ride all year round here.

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Old 11-19-17, 03:10 AM
  #52  
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Saturday -- Rowan and I cycled our November Century! We have designed numerous routes in northern Tasmania and the longest route is our 600K randonnee called Hint of Hadspen Hike.

Because we wanted to check various parts of the Hint of Hadspen Hike before we ran the event, we decided to create three shorter routes out of the sections of the Hint of Hadspen Hike. So the Hint of Hadspen Hike I, II and III were created.

Today's ride was the Hint of Hadspen Hike I. It is a beautiful out-and-back ride, mostly along the north coast of Tasmania ... ocean vistas and roaring waves most of the day! But both times we've ridden it, the wind has been a challenge. And there are some challenging little climbs as well ... no Mt Wellington or anything but a few steep pinches.

We're a little out of shape this month, and I'm recovering from dental surgery. My stitches are out now, and it's healing well, but in addition to the aches and pains of being out of shape, my jaw is sore!!

Nevertheless, we made it!

Distance: 162.3km
Elevation: 1,477m
Moving Time: 8:27:21
Elapsed Time: 9:58:21
Speed: Avg: 19.2 km/h | Max: 47.5 km/h
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Old 11-19-17, 10:12 PM
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November in the bag

Jan 2017 - "Tour De Cape" in Cape Coral FL
Feb 2017 - Solo century, 40 degree F, Illinois-Wisconsin
Mar 2017 - "Giordana Gran Fondo Florida", San Antonio FL
Apr 2017 - Another local century (Chicago IL)
May 2017 - YET ANOTHER local, solo century (Chicago IL)
Jun 2017 - Swedish Days Fox Valley Ride
Jul 2017 - Silver Comet Trail - 200k Smyrna GA to Alabama and back
Aug 2017 - Solo Boundary waters, MN century
Sep 2017 - Ride The Rivers, St Louis MO
Oct 2017 - Pumpkin Pie Ride, Ottawa IL
Nov 2017 - Tour De Tucson, AZ

Spent 3 days in Tuscon for the Tour De Tucson. Just a fantastic event, I highly recommend. 7,000+ riders, perfect weather, good scenery, and the BEST organized event.

When I say best organized - literally every intersection had police blocks stopping all traffic and letting riders go through. Out of the 50 or so intersections, we got stopped at 2 briefly.

I rented a bike. 2 months before the event, I reserved a Specialized Roubaix, which I was very excited to try out as I've been considering buying one. Fast forward to 2 days before the event and I contact my rental guy, and he tells me it was wrecked so he is giving me an Allez! What !? Clearly I was disappointed, but it got worse. I showed up and the Allez I got was a Claris groupset, and the bars were a bit bent. So I had to take to the bikeshop to get those straightened up.

Fast forward to the race - I get 200 meters into it and my gears begin slipping. Consistently. Now, this "ride" is timed, and if you finish the 106 miles in under 5 hours, you get a particular medal, and if you finish in under 6 hours you get a "gold" medal. I'd never finished under 6 hours elapsed time for a century, but was aiming for that. Hence my dismay at having to pull over 2 miles in to adjust the barrell screws. And then, the gears only got slightly better.

But I was making good time, skipping the stops that were available, until mile 44 was sort of a forced stop to carry your bike across a river (a dry Arizona river) with a SAG/rest stop at the end. So I had the mechanic look at it and he gave it a quick going over.

Back on the road and it still slipped on occasion, but I thought I had a chance to make it, so plowed through. When I got to mile 85 or so, I was tired and hot and there was a nice rest stop. Dismounted, and a few girls asked if I wanted them to hold my bike while I got my refreshments. Just fantastic service.

Got back on thinking I was going to finish in 6:10 or so, but got a second wind and finished the 106 in 5:45, my personal best. I limped home the last 2 miles after knowing I had it in the bag. But in an unforseen twist, they compute your time from the start gun, not from when you cross the start, so my official time was 5:54. Still good enough, but I definitely ran the risk of missing the gold.

All in all a great event. Best "friendly" ride I've done. And because all turns / intersections were manned, it can be very fast. This years winners finished in 4:03, that is averaging 26 miles per hour.

My strava link: https://www.strava.com/activities/1280939316

December - I'll be in Tokyo for a week and am trying to hunt down Joewein for one of his scenic rides. Failing that I can manage one the week of Christmas in Atlanta on the Silver Comet, if anyone wants to join!
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Old 12-10-17, 06:45 AM
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Sunday -- Rowan and I cycled our December Century. We have completed the Century-A-Month challenge with a minimum of one century (100 mile ride) in each month of the year!!


We were hoping to ride this century last weekend, however, our area got nearly 100 mm of rain over the couple days of the weekend, and cold and wind, and we just weren't all that keen on cycling 100 miles in those conditions. And in fact, trees fell and blocked the roads in a number of places, and other roads were flooded, so it really would not have been advisable.

So we pushed it back a week. But this week has been very busy, especially for Rowan, and doing a century this weekend was not really the thing we wanted to be doing. However, things are going to get even busier, so we figured we'd better get it done.

This century looked good on paper and we've ridden the whole route in bits and pieces at one point or another with no difficulty at all. But in thinking about it, the last time I've ridden the hilliest parts of the route was roughly last year this time when I was feeling fitter!

Nevertheless, off we went. The ride started by climbing and climbing and climbing. Then we had a fast descent into Hobart, a brisk ride through the city, and onto flat ground on the other side of the range ... the cycleway. But we were straight into a wind blowing at 41 km/h and gusting to 61 km/h. There was one gust, while we were cycling through the city, that knocked my bicycle into the next lane and I had to quickly get myself back again. Fortunately the traffic was fairly light just then.

We slogged into the wind for the full length of the cycleway (13.5 km) and on out to New Norfolk (another 22 km). The planned route continued another 20 km into the wind, but in New Norfolk, we stopped to have something to eat, and made the decision to take advantage of the tailwind, and head back. All that climbing and 35.5 km of cycling into a strong wind had exhausted us. In addition, just outside New Norfolk on the way there, Rowan had flatted and changed his tube, so that took some extra time.

The tailwind back into Hobart was lovely, and in order to make up the distance, we did an extra lap of the cycleway (27 km in total) but unfortunately, Rowan was having no end of difficulty with his tube/tire. We still couldn't tell you what caused the flat, but a little hole was being cut into the tire from somewhere or something. Finally, toward the end of that lap, we seemed to have solved the problem.

Then it was up and over Bonnet Hill ... more climbing ... and back to the start point. We stopped and took a little break there, then completed the last 8 km to make up the century.

I think this might have been the toughest century of the lot of them this year!!

Distance: 161.0 km
Elevation: 1,840 m
Moving Time: 8:51:27
Elapsed Time: 11:22:01
Speed: Avg: 18.2 km/h Max: 47.5 km/h
Temp high for the day: 25C ... and windy!
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Old 12-11-17, 08:57 AM
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Rode 101 miles yesterday but it was split into 2 segments so not a continuous century but still "time on the saddle." I don't get out riding as often as others on this forum or even like the people I occasionally ride with so my goal is to make every ride count towards a future bigger picture goal. 4 rides this month at 127 miles, 156 miles, 101 miles and 101 miles. Next ride is Saturday and looking at 125 miles providing good weather.
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Old 12-17-17, 09:57 PM
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As every year, my friend Tim, a wheel builder and local bike shop owner, organised a Santa ride where all participants are encouraged to dress up fully or partially. The usual destination, the Tomin no Mori hiking trail head in the mountains, was off-limits to to ice on the roads at up to 900 m (3000 ft) elevation so the event was moved to Lake Tsukui, west of Sagamihara near Tokyo.

This year December has been unseasonably cold. We've seen temperatures that we don't normally experience until January. Winter under climate change is like leaving the fridge door open: Cold air will leak out while the ice melts.

I left home at 08:15 to ride to the event meeting place, a convenience store at Yanokuchi station by 09:00.



A total of 10 of us did the 70 km loop together. The first part of the ride took us up some rolling hills and quite a few of us sweated under the Santa gear. The white beard that one of my friends was wearing came off at the first stop to regroup. I first did not wear my jacket over my long sleeve jersey and my long underwear felt a bit warm under my fleece-lined wind stopping trousers, but later in the day I was very glad to have as many layers available. It got very chilly before sunset.

We passed many cars with kids who would wave at us and we waved back and shouted "Merry Christmas!" Even adults would often smile or wave at us.

The day was sunny but very windy. It seemed that whatever way we turned, we were always into a head wind. I felt I was definitely the slowest rider in the group and had to work harder than I normally would.

At a convenience store near the lake we picked up food and drinks, then turned off the main road and followed a quiet back road around the lake. Near the dam there was a small park with benches overlooking the lake. This is where we took our lunch break. I handed out tangerines to everyone that I had bought at the store. Later we took some group pictures.

On the way home we mostly followed the same route back. It was about two o'clock when we got back to the meeting point, without any punctures or crashes or other incidents. Some of us went for a restaurant lunch from there, others cycled back to Tokyo as a group.

I was close to half a century distance and it wasn't late in the day so, even though I am planning to do a Century on Wednesday with bikeforum.net member @Lightchop who is visiting Japan, I decided to add enough distance (and hours) to cross the 160.9 km(100 mi) threshold. I rode up the Tamagawa river on the bike path with one of the participants, until we were close to his home. Then I turned around to escape the head wind and rode down the river for about 30 km. By then it got really chilly. The wind chill added to the low temperatures. I covered up my ears but my throat still felt the cold air. Once I stopped for hot coffee and instant noodles.

Close to Haneda airport I switched to National Route 15, a major artery in Tokyo. I cycled past Tokyo Tower (Japan's clone of Eiffel tower) to the Imperial Palace. The wind was not as fierce in Tokyo as along the river and traffic wasn't actually too bad. Near my house I did some grocery shopping to fix myself dinner, as my wife was out for an event. The Swift Ozette XL front bag will swallow so much stuff, I love it!

Altogether I rode 165 km, for my 64th consecutive month of Century-A-Month. It had been three weeks since my last century and didn't ride at all last weekend due to a stomach bug. Hopefully it will help me to regain some fitness.

I will soon finalize the route for the Wednesday ride. It will be a pleasure to share a ride with a member of this forum
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Old 12-21-17, 01:09 AM
  #57  
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@Lightchop and I completed a century in hilly west Izu peninsula together. I got up at 03:00, picked him up by car at his hotel in Tokyo at 05:00 and we drove to Mishima station in the northern part of Izu. From there we set out at sunrise (around 07:00) to explore the scenic but mountainous coast line together. The first and last 30 km of this 179 km out-and-back course are mostly flat, but the middle ~120 km have about 2400 m (8000 ft) of barometric elevation gain. Apart from a few towns we passed through, the route is either up or down all the way.

About 60 km into the course I noticed that my rear derailleur wasn't upshifting all the way to the heaviest gear on downhills. Sometimes it would go as far as second heaviest, sometimes it would not go into the four tallest gears. I suspected a frazzled shifter cable (last changed 9,000 km ago and overdue for annual replacement). I could still use all the crucial climbing gears. Since we were a third into the ride already and closer to the turnaround point than the start, I decided to risk it and continue. It really only made a difference on the flat stretches, of which there weren't many.

After 80 km (50 mi) we turned off the main road and climbed a steep back road through a village and past some mushroom plantations in the forest. Lightchop had to drop me on the climbs to maintain a reasonable cadence with the mid-compact rental bike while I crawled up with my light gears. from the top of the back road we descended 4 km to Kumomi Onsen, a small hot spring town next to Mt Eboshi, a spectacular rock that hosts a Shinto shrine. Out in the sea we saw a rope bridge between two rocks, which I think also serves some kind of Shinto function. 70 km to the north as the crow flies we could see snow capped Mt Fuji, separated from us by the blue waters of Suruga bay.



The road rises high above the coast line. It's almost like an airplane view.

We passed through Iwachi Onsen, where I had often holidayed with my family when my kids were little. The views on the coastal road, sandwiched between the ocean and the mountains were spectacular.

We made our way north again, back to Matsuzaki and Toi, racing against the sunset. My hope to make it to the last big climb on the northwest corner of Izu had been overoptimistic. We were still climbing the last big mountain before that when the last daylight was already fading.



With a dynamo hub I have no issues with riding in the dark, but I had left the spare battery for the Volt 300, which I had brought for Lightchop in the car. The unit is specified to last only 3 hours in steady mode at full brightness, so it was a concern. We did make it back to the car without running out of battery.

We loaded both bikes into the car again and drove back to Tokyo, where I dropped off Lightchop at the hotel again.

Lightchop, congratulations to completing your year of A Century A Month! For me it was Century #27 this year, the highest annual total since I started cycling again.

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Old 12-26-17, 10:18 AM
  #58  
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Final 2017 Century

Not much I can add to the post above! Joewein was a great host and showed me probably the best ride of my life. After the first 40 miles of glorious climbs and decents through fishing villages, I recall telling him this is the best ride I've ever done.

Fast forward to mile 85 and walking up a steep hill, I was beginning to question that comment!

But it truly was great. One thing not captured in the photos were some of the many tunnels we had to take to get through the mountains. The amount of scenic views was astounding. I might also add the occasional mikan honor stands such as the photo below.



I'd also add that when we got back to the car, we noticed my rear wheel was loose - the skewer had completely gone loose. Whether that caused my climbing issues from mile 80 or not, I dont know. The other contributing factor was the gearing - I checked out my bike (after the ride!) and it was a 52/36 up front and my largest gear on the back was a 27!? I counted it multiple times. Never heard of an 11/27. But at best was 11/28. So I would have been climbing with 36/28 combo, which is undergeared to my liking. But hey it was a rental bike!

The Strava Link


All in all a great year of centuries, topped off with a great ride with the Founder of Century-A-Month!
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Old 12-26-17, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Lightchop View Post
topped off with a great ride with the Founder of Century-A-Month!
There's been a Century-A-Month thread in this section since at least 2008, way before I even joined this forum, so the honour belongs to someone else

I am glad you enjoyed the experience (mostly! )! Regarding the gearing, if the big sprocket was a 27, perhaps it was a CS-5700 12-27? A 12 would make sense with a 52 chain ring.

If I were to retire to somewhere in the countryside, West Izu would be near the top of my list because of its stunning scenery. And those hilly roads would give me an incentive to stay fit. I'll be riding my second brevet of the year there in March.

I'll be starting a new thread for 2018 soon. Stay safe in the New Year and looking forward to your ride reports!

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Old 12-30-17, 08:49 PM
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Altogether I did 27 centuries this year, at least in one in every calendar month and the highest annual total since I started riding centuries (in 2012 I rode 11 of them, in 2013 and 2014 it was 21 and in 2015 and 2016 it was 22). The shortest century was 163 km (101 mi), the longest 363 km (225 mi). I also rode 5 metric centuries, which are medium distance rides to me

My most active month was September with 4 centuries. On the opposite end were February and August with only a single century each (due to business travel and lots rain, respectively). The rest of the months I rode either two or three centuries.

The key to being able to maintain the century streak (now at 64 months):

1) Not getting seriously injured. The worst injury I suffered in the last couple of years was a cracked rib two years ago, but I could still cycle with that. I have become more and more risk averse, being neither the fastest descender nor keen on beating traffic lights or drafting vehicles in the city. I want to get there safely, not quickly.

2) Commitment. If at all possible, I try to do a century on the first weekend of the month, then I have 6-7 weeks until I have to do one again to keep it up. If I have to travel on business or the weather forecast says rain, rain and more rain then I'll take a day off during the week when I'm at home and the weather is fine. Seize the day!

3) Getting the family on board. My wife does worry about accidents, but she understands that cycling has been good for my health. Usually I'll ride on a Saturday or on a Sunday, but not both. It also helps that our kids are grown up.

4) Last but not least, enjoying the rides. I take many pictures because I love the views and want others to see them too. It's not just a numbers game or a challenge, but fun to see the country and its people.

I am looking forward to my first century in 2018, which I'll post in the new thread.
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Old 12-31-17, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by joewein View Post
Altogether I did 27 centuries this year, at least in one in every calendar month and the highest annual total since I started riding centuries (in 2012 I rode 11 of them, in 2013 and 2014 it was 21 and in 2015 and 2016 it was 22). The shortest century was 163 km (101 mi), the longest 363 km (225 mi). I also rode 5 metric centuries, which are medium distance rides to me

My most active month was September with 4 centuries. On the opposite end were February and August with only a single century each (due to business travel and lots rain, respectively). The rest of the months I rode either two or three centuries.

The key to being able to maintain the century streak (now at 64 months):

1) Not getting seriously injured. The worst injury I suffered in the last couple of years was a cracked rib two years ago, but I could still cycle with that. I have become more and more risk averse, being neither the fastest descender nor keen on beating traffic lights or drafting vehicles in the city. I want to get there safely, not quickly.

2) Commitment. If at all possible, I try to do a century on the first weekend of the month, then I have 6-7 weeks until I have to do one again to keep it up. If I have to travel on business or the weather forecast says rain, rain and more rain then I'll take a day off during the week when I'm at home and the weather is fine. Seize the day!

3) Getting the family on board. My wife does worry about accidents, but she understands that cycling has been good for my health. Usually I'll ride on a Saturday or on a Sunday, but not both. It also helps that our kids are grown up.

4) Last but not least, enjoying the rides. I take many pictures because I love the views and want others to see them too. It's not just a numbers game or a challenge, but fun to see the country and its people.

I am looking forward to my first century in 2018, which I'll post in the new thread.
Well done!! And thank you very much for running this one and starting the new one.

We're hoping to do two of these back-to-back. In the past we've often done one, and then not the next year. So we'll see how we go in 2018.

And I really like your photos!
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