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Hydraution Storage Method

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Old 09-21-17, 09:27 AM
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Hydraution Storage Method

Hi

So...I had to stop several times to buy water/Gaterade at Dollar Store or gas stations...and that was expensive because I drank alot and was very hungry.


Is it possible to carry all the water and electrolytes on the bike from the beginning, to save some money? And pack a cheap lunch too.
, especially in hot weather?

I realize a liter of water weighs 2 pounds...so you cannot have your cake and eat it too.

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Old 09-21-17, 09:48 AM
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It would be cool if you could store water inside the frame. Of course, keeping it clean would be a challenge...

Realistically, the answer is Yes. Of course, how long a trip it is, how hot it is, how hard you're working will all play into how much you need, and how feasible it is. Most bikes have places for two bottle holders on the frame, and room for a third if you aren't using the TT for something else. You can also get a dual bottle holder that goes behind/below the seat.

I think "typical" bottles hold 16-24oz (500-750ml), but I have 1 liter ones. 5 liters would generally last me 5-6 hours.

If you need more than that you could put racks front and rear and/or get a trailer. Camelbak type packs are effective as well, to haul another 3-4 liters. I personally don't like wearing anything besides a jersey on my back, but have done it occasionally. If you go that route you would probably do well to drink what's in the pack first so you're not carrying it.

I prefer to plan my route so that I can make strategic stops at places where I can buy replenishments, and just carry 2 liters. It's a good excuse to take a break no more than every 2 hours, which is about what I need, functionally.
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Old 09-21-17, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
So...I had to stop several times to buy water/Gaterade at Dollar Store or gas stations...and that was expensive because I drank alot and was very hungry.


Is it possible to carry all the water and electrolytes on the bike from the beginning, to save some money? And pack a cheap lunch too.
, especially in hot weather?
If you're in a populated area why bother to carry it all from the start? Just about every fast food place and lots of gas stations have a soda fountain that dispenses ice and water and I've never been turned down when I ask if I can refill my water bottle there. If you need electrolytes it's easy enough to carry some of the tablets or a little powder of your favorite brand to drop in the water bottle.
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Old 09-21-17, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by FlamsteadHill View Post
It would be cool if you could store water inside the frame. Of course, keeping it clean would be a challenge...
During the ride, I bought 3 bottles of Gatorade and 3 bottles of H2O. Total comes out to be over $10. Could have easily been more, if I didn't find a water fountain half way along the route.

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Old 09-21-17, 10:20 AM
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Is it possible to bring water along, you ask... what an amazing idea. Why has no one thought of this before?

Oh wait, they have.

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Old 09-21-17, 10:33 AM
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Wow, are those huge bottles or a small frame?
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Old 09-21-17, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by FlamsteadHill View Post
Wow, are those huge bottles or a small frame?
Haha, pretty sure it's just the latter. I grabbed a Google pic at random.

But they do make some pretty large water bottles these days.
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Old 09-21-17, 11:48 AM
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You need a bag. If you are going with a hydration pack, a lot of food fits in there with the water.

get water for free if you can. Most convenience stores have a sink or somewhere you can get water. Even the water fountain. I wear a hydration pack, but that and 2 bottles only lasts about 100 miles or so.

I carried pbj sandwiches on a 600km ride earlier this year. I can only eat so many of those though. Put peanut butter on both slices of bread and jelly in the middle. If you have a bag, then food possibilities abound.
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Old 09-21-17, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Is it possible to carry all the water and electrolytes on the bike from the beginning, to save some money?
Maybe. But maybe not.

Different people need different amounts of hydration. If you drink a lot of water, and/or are doing long rides (4+ hours), it's going to be a challenge to carry all the water you'll need.

Gatorade powder is pretty cheap, so you can pick that up before you ride.

You can usually refill water from a tap when you eat lunch, or stop at a convenience store. I make sure to buy something if I refill bottles at a convenience store or gas station.
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Old 09-22-17, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Is it possible to carry all the water and electrolytes on the bike from the beginning, to save some money? And pack a cheap lunch too.
, especially in hot weather?

Sure I do it all the time. I do solo self supported 80-100+ mile rides in 90-100+ degree heat in rural areas without services. I use a backpack and I put in bottles of fluid based on what I expect to need and some extra. I have, at times, carried 6-7 bottles in addition to the 2 on my bike. That can be up to 200 oz of fluids I'm carrying along with me. I also have food in the backpack. It starts out heavy, but gets lighter as you consume what you brought. Sometimes I've brought more than I need, but I don't want to run out. One ride I did on a very hot day included drinking all the approx. 120 oz of fluids I had and I still came back 9 lbs lighter. That's not something I want to go through again.
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Old 09-22-17, 10:09 PM
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I've used a Camelbak for this. Their bladders come in various sizes up to 3 L, and some of their bags can hold a second bladder, so that would be over 1.5 gallons (that's a lot of water--got me through 100 miles at 110F). Put a bottle with your electrolyte in it on the bike and you're set.

Admittedly, that's also a lot of weight to carry on your back. Camelbak does make something they call an "unbottle," which is basically a bladder carrier you can strap on to something else. If you've got a rack on your bike, you can lash one to the top of that.

Also: dollar stores will often sell a gallon of water for $1. You'd buy a lot of gallons of water before you broke even on a more capacious water-carrying rig. If you're carrying electrolyte powder or tablets, that's all you need.
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Old 09-23-17, 01:34 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Haha, pretty sure it's just the latter. I grabbed a Google pic at random.

But they do make some pretty large water bottles these days.
Yes ... we carry a pair of bottles which are nearly 1 litre each.

At the 750 ml every 1 to 1.5 hour recommendation, 2 litres of water can last close to 4 hours.

Our centuries might be 8 hours, so we fill up at the beginning, then stop at a public toilet and fill up half way through. Or maybe buy a large bottle of water somewhere around the halfway mark and top up. It doesn't cost that much.
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Old 09-23-17, 01:35 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
During the ride, I bought 3 bottles of Gatorade and 3 bottles of H2O. Total comes out to be over $10. Could have easily been more, if I didn't find a water fountain half way along the route.
Stop drinking Gatorade.
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Old 09-23-17, 04:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Stop drinking Gatorade.
Yeah, beer is cheaper.
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Old 09-24-17, 05:10 AM
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The one liter Smartwater brand water bottles fit most bottle cages very well. (I picked that tidbit up from someone on the Touring board several years ago.) I usually use those bottles for touring, see photo.

SOme frames lack a place to mount a cage below the downtube. Velo Orange sells the straps that were included with bottle cages decades ago before frame manufacturers started putting cage bolt fittings on frames. Or you can use hose clamps. This only works with cages that have a tab that the strap can strap onto, most cages do not have that any more.
https://store.velo-orange.com/index....age-clamp.html

The big bottles below the downtube, I usually add a velcro strap at the top to keep the bottle firmly attached so that it can't hit my fender (or in the photo, hit the tire).

If I am going to do a long ride on a hot day, I usually will carry two more bottles in either (1) a rack top bag or (2) one of those brackets that hold two cages behind the seat. Those brackets behind the seat come in two styles, one attaches around the seatpost and the other clamps onto the seat rails. I do not have a good photo, but you likely have seen them before.

I like bottles instead of a hydration pack, with bottles I know my inventory much better than I would with a big bladder. But some people like a bladder in a frame bag or backpack.

Lunch is in the handlebar bag.
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Old 09-24-17, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I like bottles instead of a hydration pack, with bottles I know my inventory much better than I would with a big bladder.
Ah, yes. I did notice that the two days I rode with a pack because the bike I was riding didn't have cages. For me, knowing I'm on track visually is much more accurate than how I'm feeling. I know I would drink less if I relied on feel.

I use some cheap 1 liter bottles I got from Amazon that fit all four types/brands of cages I've had opportunity to try them in.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 09-24-17, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Stop drinking Gatorade.
Or carry the powder, which is cheap in bulk and lightweight; then you just have to find free water.
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Old 09-25-17, 12:44 AM
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Originally Posted by antimonysarah View Post
Or carry the powder, which is cheap in bulk and lightweight; then you just have to find free water.
Are you talking about dehydrated H2O powder?
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Old 09-25-17, 09:36 AM
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I've been known to stop within 10 miles of home to buy something to drink, because I needed it, and because I was so bummed when I went by there one Sunday when they were closed and I really needed something that I was happy to do my part to help keep them open. Those little country stores are precious when you need them, and I don't mind a bit of socialization after a few hours in the saddle.


YMMV, of course.
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Old 09-25-17, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
I've been known to stop within 10 miles of home to buy something to drink, because I needed it, and because I was so bummed when I went by there one Sunday when they were closed and I really needed something that I was happy to do my part to help keep them open. Those little country stores are precious when you need them, and I don't mind a bit of socialization after a few hours in the saddle.


YMMV, of course.
Never thought of it that way. I guess I can afford a few more bucks every week.
Maybe it'll help improve cycling image too.
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Old 10-01-17, 05:53 PM
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Remember a couple of things and it will change your mind on everything you do...

1) Most bottled water is nothing more than tap water. Why waste any money on tap water when you go to a fast food joint or gas station and get the tap water for free.
2) 95% of the water throughout the world contains BPA. You can't avoid it by buying bottled water. BPA aka the plastic bottles are polluting the oceans and there are islands even popping up that are totally made out of plastic bottles. So this plastic from water bottles is already in the oceans and the sun is breaking it down and adding it to the water cycle and spreading the BPA worldwide. The report about BPA in drinking water around the US/world just came out a couple of weeks ago.
3) Unless you are drinking distilled water you are still getting all the harmful extras that the treatment plants are using when you are drinking bottled/tap water.

Why stress over the bad water when its all bad to start with, just go for the free stuff and go crazy once you get home.

Isn't it amazing...this all started way back when...when people started buying colored water in bottles, aka pasturized milk. The industry found that if they told you the water was better you would be stupid enough to believe it was even though it was nothing more than tap water, just like pasturized milk is nothing more than colored water.
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Old 11-30-17, 09:50 AM
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Since I've been doing brevets with the PA Randonneurs on a regular basis, I've learned to look out for "rando water" at the controles. I'm never the first rider to get to a controle, and later in the ride it's a safe assumption that one of the riders in front of me has already bought a gallon of water at the convenience store that serves as a controle, and has left the half full bottle on the sidewalk outside the store.
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