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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

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Old 10-11-17, 10:18 PM   #26
twodownzero
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I am also thinking of putting an extra set of supports to the brake mounts. I just need to get the double head bolts

I have disc brakes so that isn't an option, but the firm crown is threaded.
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Old 10-12-17, 02:49 PM   #27
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My friend and I have been doing regular longer rides and hope to complete a super randonneur series in 2018. In September, we completed our first brevet, a 215k ride. It was both of our first times riding over 100 miles but we have been trying to do at least a metric century on every weekend we ride together. I am riding my Surly Disc Trucker and she rides a Specialized Sequoia Elite. While these bikes are probably heavier/tougher than what is needed for the riding we are doing, both of us are very happy with our bikes overall; they are comfortable for us and as we put down more and more miles, we are very much looking forward to these longer rides as our speed is building up to put "time in the bank." During our longer rides now, we are using a top tube bag to carry our food/electrolyte tablets, and other items we need to do these rides self-supported. The plan is usually to carry everything we need and rely on the controls only for water and for an actual meal that we eat while on the brevet.

Since we live in a place where it is warm enough to ride year-round, we also desire to be able to carry additional layers and our reflective gear that is required for the longer brevets that involve riding in the dark.

Can anyone recommend a handlebar bag for our goals? Either of us are okay with using a front rack if needed. The bags and rack do not need to be classic looking and can be made from modern, synthetic materials if need-be. We do want to be able to see our cue sheets on the top of the bags and of course keep the bag away from our hands, the bike's controls, and if we need to move our headlights (currently in fork mounts) to accommodate, that is fine.

Thanks in advance for any advice you may give.

I've been pondering similar questions. I can tell you what I'm using on my bike that I tour with. You may find it adds more weight than you're comfortable with, but so far, it looks like I can't beat it weight-wise by as much as I'd hoped since I will still need at least the tubus duo at 500+ grams for panniers anyway. So, what I've been using this season is a VO porteur rack. You could leave off the rack surround if you want to shave some weight. It will accept a traditional rack top bag, mine has the map sleeve on top, I can see it easily. If I were more coordinated, I could probably actually grab stuff from it as I rode....so far, I'm not that graceful. I had a ton of stuff in my rack top bag, and because of the weather last weekend, brought but used only briefly a soft shell jacket. No room in my panniers, but with the cargo netting, kept everything contained nicely.

I do not have a hub powered light, so no wiring, though I do use a Paul Gino light mount for my usb powered light off the rack. VO also sells an inexpensive light mount that I suspect would work for more traditional rando style lighting, though not sure if it will protect the light like you're looking for.
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Old 10-14-17, 04:27 PM   #28
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My setup is for touring, not rando riding. But it should work just as well.

I have enough steerer tube on each of my bikes for a second stem. On some bikes I have a short stub of handlebar in that second stem to mount the bar bag bracket, but on one bike I used a short piece of PVC pipe to mount my handlebar bag bracket to the stem.

The bags I have have not been sold for several years, plus I spent several hours modifying the bags, so I am not highlighting the bags in this post, only the concept of a second stem.

In all three cases in the photos, I am running interrupter brake levers, since the bar bag bracket is not attached to my handlebars I do not lose any valuable real estate on the bars for computer, GPS, bell, etc.

In the first photo I used an adjustable stem, that allowed me to get the bag lower and also get the weight closer to the steerer tube which is the steering axis. I do not attach lights to the handlebar, I have dynohub powered lights on two of these bikes. But with the lower bar bag, I probably could attach a light above the bar bag if I wanted to.
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Old 10-19-17, 11:22 AM   #29
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My setup is for touring, not rando riding. But it should work just as well.

I have enough steerer tube on each of my bikes for a second stem. On some bikes I have a short stub of handlebar in that second stem to mount the bar bag bracket, but on one bike I used a short piece of PVC pipe to mount my handlebar bag bracket to the stem.

The bags I have have not been sold for several years, plus I spent several hours modifying the bags, so I am not highlighting the bags in this post, only the concept of a second stem.

In all three cases in the photos, I am running interrupter brake levers, since the bar bag bracket is not attached to my handlebars I do not lose any valuable real estate on the bars for computer, GPS, bell, etc.

In the first photo I used an adjustable stem, that allowed me to get the bag lower and also get the weight closer to the steerer tube which is the steering axis. I do not attach lights to the handlebar, I have dynohub powered lights on two of these bikes. But with the lower bar bag, I probably could attach a light above the bar bag if I wanted to.
I'm using the same light as you're using on the top most bike. I am currently using an adjustable stem on my handlebar, which I want to replace anyway. I may order another stem and give it a try. I will measure carefully before I do, because I have quite a bit less head tube than you. I do have room for the second stem, but if the bag hangs too low, it'll block the headlight, after which I might as well just install a rack and physically move the light. It's certainly cheaper to do it that way.
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Old 10-19-17, 05:48 PM   #30
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I'm using the same light as you're using on the top most bike. I am currently using an adjustable stem on my handlebar, which I want to replace anyway. I may order another stem and give it a try. I will measure carefully before I do, because I have quite a bit less head tube than you. I do have room for the second stem, but if the bag hangs too low, it'll block the headlight, after which I might as well just install a rack and physically move the light. It's certainly cheaper to do it that way.
That metal B&M light bracket can be bent pretty easily if you have a big vice and some other tools that offer good leverage.

My light bracket originally was the extra long mount (60mm), I am not sure but I think the one I used is B&M474DLPB I got that part number off Peter White site.
Mounting Lights from Peter White Cycles

But I used a really big vice and a 16 inch long crescent wrench, and a few other tools (like a big hammer) to bend my mount into something that is not even close to resembling the original shape of the mount. See photo.

Or, if you do not have access to good tools or if you are hesitant to start messing with something that works perfectly well right now, you might consider a different off-the-shelf mount that puts your light lower, check out the Peter White link above for other options that mount the light lower.

I was unable to buy a long enough mounting bolt for my setup, thus I bought a 6mm threaded rod (galvanized, the hardware store did not have it in stainless) and a bunch of nuts and washers.
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Old 10-20-17, 07:59 AM   #31
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I definitely have a 24" crescent wrench and a big vise in my garage, so anything is possible.

Do yourself a favor and get some flush-cutting shear cutters. They'll allow you to cut those zip ties flush so you don't have sharp edges. You can get them on ebay from China for less than $3, just make sure you never use them to cut anything except plastic and they'll hold up just fine.
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Old 10-20-17, 09:15 AM   #32
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I was going to take a picture of my setup. Maybe today. I am really happy with having my lights under my rack, although the battery powered light is a bit awkward to turn on while riding. Then again, I have only turned it on/off while riding.
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Old 10-20-17, 09:37 AM   #33
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That metal B&M light bracket can be bent pretty easily if you have a big vice and some other tools that offer good leverage.
I bent mine flat to put the light just above the fender. I used a long piece of gas pipe and bent it to the position I wanted while it was mounted to the bike.
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Old 10-20-17, 10:01 AM   #34
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...
Do yourself a favor and get some flush-cutting shear cutters. They'll allow you to cut those zip ties flush so you don't have sharp edges. You can get them on ebay from China for less than $3, just make sure you never use them to cut anything except plastic and they'll hold up just fine.
I am not sure what you mean. I have a twisty wire thing like a bread loaf wrapper with the head tube behind it in the photo. That just keeps one cable from flopping around, I do not mind the way it looks.

Or, perhaps you mean where I have the cable attached to the frame where a zip tie was used. Since the photo was taken, that zip tie was removed and replaced with one of these. Thus if you were talking about these zip ties, thanks but I already fixed it.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-Jagwi...-/262273630150

Thanks.
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Old 10-20-17, 10:33 AM   #35
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I am not sure what you mean. I have a twisty wire thing like a bread loaf wrapper with the head tube behind it in the photo. That just keeps one cable from flopping around, I do not mind the way it looks.

Or, perhaps you mean where I have the cable attached to the frame where a zip tie was used. Since the photo was taken, that zip tie was removed and replaced with one of these. Thus if you were talking about these zip ties, thanks but I already fixed it.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-Jagwi...-/262273630150

Thanks.
My Surly has slightly different housing holders, so I use zip ties. I use this to cut them off flush so I don't cut myself:



For those of you who use zip ties for anything, these are a must. They will cut them off completely flush with no sharp edge.

I really like the clips you posted; that looks really clean.

I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who is anal about this stuff. In fact, my cable housings are a bit long and I'm about to pull them off and shorten them just because I want to clean them up. If I did as much maintenance to my cars as I do to my bicycles, they'd last forever!
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Old 10-20-17, 11:22 AM   #36
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My Surly has slightly different housing holders, so I use zip ties. I use this to cut them off flush so I don't cut myself:



For those of you who use zip ties for anything, these are a must. They will cut them off completely flush with no sharp edge.

I really like the clips you posted; that looks really clean.

I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who is anal about this stuff. In fact, my cable housings are a bit long and I'm about to pull them off and shorten them just because I want to clean them up. If I did as much maintenance to my cars as I do to my bicycles, they'd last forever!
I usually leave a quarter inch of zip tie sticking out so I can grip it later and pull harder with a pliers if I want.

To cut zip ties I usually use a toenail clipper, similar to this:
https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/st...209380-product
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Old 10-21-17, 11:38 AM   #37
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I find this thread interesting, i.e. Front rack and rando bag compatibility.

I do wonder why this is such a tough nut to crack, and wish there was a line/system of front racks and matching bags by one company that could fit almost and bike you have, regardless of crown fork / break / fork eyelets etc. then people could remove the front rack compatibility consideration when bike/frame shopping.
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Old 10-22-17, 11:54 AM   #38
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as long as you have a hole at the fork crown, if you have mid fork eyelets or even just dropout eyelets, you can mount a rando-style rack. I made a rack for dropout eyelets and a fork crown mounted brake, but VO sells one. Most of us really don't put that much weight in a rando bag, or at least I hope not. The VO racks seem perfectly serviceable.

A rando bag is the second-best thing to happen to my randonneuring, the first being dyno lights.
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Old 10-24-17, 11:07 AM   #39
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I suppose thatís what I mean: if someone has a mid level Cannondale / Specialized / Giant road bike , rides a few centuries and stumbles upon randonneuring and wants a front rack / bag for convenience - and this describes a majority of us at one point or another - chances are that there are no fork eyelets and the fork is either carbon or aluminum. Even cyclocross bikes, which sometimes have more appropriate gearing and can accommodate tire width more conducive to long brevets , often do not have fork eyelets. Maybe I havenít been looking closely enough, but thatís My impression.
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Old 10-24-17, 11:33 AM   #40
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I think you are right about that. Add the preponderance of carbon forks, and a handlebar mounted bag is probably the only way to go. Unless a rider is willing to replace their fork or have it modified. The rise of bikepacking has made the selection of appropriate carbon forks a lot better, although they aren't going to fit on a typical race geometry bike.
Lots of people do just fine with handlebar mounted bags. Getting lights to work requires some creativity.
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Old 10-25-17, 10:38 AM   #41
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If a small-ish bag will suffice, you can buy one online from the many chinese/taiwanese manufacturers like this one I used on a multi-day tour. https://i.imgur.com/eRP5p5X.jpg Since it mounts directly to the handlebar you do not need to worry about a rack or fork eyelets. If, however, you decide to go for a rack and larger bag, consider getting the Soma Porteur or Pass and stow rack. From photos it appears that the Sequoia has a two eyelets on the fork which appear to be mid-blade and low rider mount points.
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Old 10-25-17, 04:35 PM   #42
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I don't know if this adds anything to the thread, but here is my setup

Bag is an Acorn. I like it a lot better than my previous Acorn Boxy Rando, which was an early model. I did have to modify my rack to keep the straps from pushing the fender into the tire, but I intentionally made the rack ride pretty close to the tire. Most commercial racks have a lot more clearance.

Decaler is on the todo list, although the straps have worked fine over a 400k and 600k. I keep saying this bike is only temporary.
IMAG1151_1 by unterhausen, on Flickr

IMAG1149 by unterhausen, on Flickr
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Old 10-26-17, 08:07 PM   #43
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I suppose thatís what I mean: if someone has a mid level Cannondale / Specialized / Giant road bike , rides a few centuries and stumbles upon randonneuring and wants a front rack / bag for convenience - and this describes a majority of us at one point or another - chances are that there are no fork eyelets and the fork is either carbon or aluminum. Even cyclocross bikes, which sometimes have more appropriate gearing and can accommodate tire width more conducive to long brevets , often do not have fork eyelets. Maybe I havenít been looking closely enough, but thatís My impression.
Anecdotal, but that's pretty much me. I have a small handlebar bag that's great for self-supported summer centuries, but I want to try some spring brevets and need something a bit more substantial for rain gear, cold weather layers, etc. I also don't want to invest in a proper rando bike until I decide whether riding several hundred kilometers in one ride is really my thing.

So, yeah. A medium sized bag that doesn't require a rack would be an amazing find.
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Old 10-28-17, 03:04 AM   #44
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Maybe this is a dumb question:

For my bike - model is 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo Hi-Mod Dura Ace 2 - what is a light-ish aftermarket fork that has the optimal eyelets and hole in crown to fit what you would consider a solid front rack compatible with the best rando bags ? Not sure how relevant , but I do have aero bars. Fork material could be anything , but lighter side preferable.

Thanks.
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Old 10-28-17, 09:17 AM   #45
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Maybe this is a dumb question:

For my bike - model is 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo Hi-Mod Dura Ace 2 - what is a light-ish aftermarket fork that has the optimal eyelets and hole in crown to fit what you would consider a solid front rack compatible with the best rando bags ? Not sure how relevant , but I do have aero bars. Fork material could be anything , but lighter side preferable.

Thanks.
If you go fork shopping, it would be a good idea to know what the axle to crown race length of your existing fork is and the fork rake (or offset). It is unlikely you will ever find a perfect match, but you want to minimize the changes or you risk changing the handling. I am not an expert on geometry, so I can't comment much further than that.
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Old 10-28-17, 05:57 PM   #46
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Heading in the opposite direction, as is frequently my wont, I'm going to advocate no handlebar bag. The reason is pretty simple: it affects bike handling. My experience is that bike handling is everything. One accident can ruin your whole season. Even with a low trail fork designed for a bar bag, varying the weight in the bag will still affect handling.

When we tour on our tandem, we use a bar bag, this one: https://www.topeak.com/global/en/pro...-handlebar-bag I limit the weight in that bag to 2 lbs, which still affects handling, even on a tandem. However we're short on space with our rig, so it comes in handy.

I've never randoed with a bar bag. I use a saddle bag, this one: https://ortliebusa.com/product/saddle-bag/ in size Large. It's totally waterproof and has a clip mount so it's easy to move from bike to bike. On our tandem, it carries 2 riders' extra gear. I also use a FuelBelt top tube bag, this one: https://www.triathletesports.com/fue...-fuelbox-2016/ This has always been enough storage, even in the PNW spring rando season.

That's partially because I use light gear for all cycling modes, jackets, vests, and gloves which fit into my jersey pockets for quick access. I use one pocket for food, the other two for gear.

If the above aren't enough storage for some reason, Arkel makes a rando specific rack and bag, no eyelets required: https://www.arkel-od.com/en/arkel-randonneur-rack.html

Not using a bar bag simplifies everything so much by freeing up the front of the bike for other uses with simple mounts: lights, aero bars, multiple computers, all that stuff we need. I use a cue sheet holder mounted to my bars, this one: TOP SELLERS - Part #:94205 MAP CASE H-BAR MNT 6X6in DBL | BikeWorldUSA | Bicycle Parts and Bike Accessories but order quick, I don't think it's made anymore.
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Old 10-28-17, 10:22 PM   #47
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I've never randoed with a bar bag. I use a saddle bag, this one: https://ortliebusa.com/product/saddle-bag/ in size Large. It's totally waterproof and has a clip mount so it's easy to move from bike to bike. On our tandem, it carries 2 riders' extra gear.
Now that looks nice!

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How about a large seatbag (~7L capacity) and a small handlebar bag(2L)? There shouldn't be any impact on handling. Since both are rackless, it's pretty light too. Tools and clothes go in the seat bag. Food and camera/phone go in the bar bag. Ortleib and Baileyworks make nice small modern handlebar bags. I've mostly used a Jandd Mountain Wedge 3 seat bag since bikepacking bags weren't around when I bought it.
I'm interested in trying this type of combo. I've been very happy with my Jandd Bike Bag and have not had any issues with handling over quite a few miles. It leaves my handlebars mostly open.

For more gear, I'm wondering about a large seatbag. This Topeak Backloader is appealing because it could theoretically hold bike stuff as well as jacket, pants, warm gloves, etc.

For anyone with experience, do the larger (say, 6L as opposed to 2L) seatpacks affect handling?
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Old 10-29-17, 05:11 AM   #48
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Now that looks nice!



I'm interested in trying this type of combo. I've been very happy with my Jandd Bike Bag and have not had any issues with handling over quite a few miles. It leaves my handlebars mostly open.

For more gear, I'm wondering about a large seatbag. This Topeak Backloader is appealing because it could theoretically hold bike stuff as well as jacket, pants, warm gloves, etc.

For anyone with experience, do the larger (say, 6L as opposed to 2L) seatpacks affect handling?
In general, large seat bags have no impact on handling. I commute with a 22L seatbag, and itís rarely noticeable. The first key is that the contents cannot be allowed to shift or slosh. All the roll top bikepacking seat bags take care of that. The second thing to remember is that 20lb of stuff in your seat bag (or a trunk bag or a pannier) will be noticeable. Usually extra weight on its own just causes the bike to feel sluggish when youíre out of the saddle.
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Old 10-29-17, 01:55 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by Flounce View Post
For my bike - model is 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo Hi-Mod Dura Ace 2 - what is a light-ish aftermarket fork that has the optimal eyelets and hole in crown to fit what you would consider a solid front rack compatible with the best rando bags ? Not sure how relevant , but I do have aero bars. Fork material could be anything , but lighter side preferable.

Thanks.
google search failed to find the fork geometry. Does it have some kind of suspension in the head tube? that would make me wonder if it has a standard fork. Anyway, if the headset can be used on a standard fork, Wound-up might be your best carbon choice. Or you can have one of the carbon repair companies add eyelets. I don't think anyone offers eyelets on a fork like that, it will not clear fenders, so what's the point?

I don't know if this will work http://www.henryjames.com/hiver-carbon-fork-rtp.html

Parlee modifies forks, so does Ruckus in portland

you could talk to them about mounting a rando rack
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Old 11-06-17, 10:00 PM   #50
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I'm glad to see this thread is still going. I still haven't decided. I did order a 2nd stem to try mocking up the two stem idea to see how it packages. If I can go with a handlebar mounted bag of medium size, I may do that, because the low cost is just too tempting.

The Sequoia has two eyelets on each side of the fork for water bottle cages. If she ends up with a front rack, she'll probably have to use the Nitto with the adjustable stays. I may end up with the same one on mine if I end up having to do a rack setup.

We both have saddle bags, but we use them to carry two extra tubes, patches, tools, and small extra items that can take up the remaining space. Extra clothes and food are going to have to go in a handlebar bag or somewhere else. Maybe I'm weird about it, but I prefer not to carry anything in my jersey pockets on long rides except maybe food wrappers to throw away. The way I look at it is those three pockets are extra space if I need to carry something unexpected. I want everything I'm expecting to bring to be on the bike.

I'm not currently carrying a spare tire, but I do plan to take one with me next year on the longer rides. My bike has 26" wheels, which would greatly complicate getting any replacement tire on the road if I hit something big in the dark.

Self-reliance has always been my thing. I'm probably carrying too much stuff and my bike is way over built, but at least I don't spend all of my time worrying about my equipment, and that allows me to enjoy pushing the pedals. As such, I'm probably carrying twice as many spokes (32 hole wheels f/r) and riding a much heavier/more durable bike than I need to be riding. I guess having ridden race bikes vs. this, it doesn't seem that much slower, especially in the flats. Maybe I'll bust out the road bike with 16 spoke radial front wheel and go for a ride just to see how fast it'd be at my current level of fitness.
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