Notices
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

Race bike or 80s steel frame for 2 day event?

Old 12-21-19, 05:50 PM
  #1  
stykthyn
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 330
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 131 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Race bike or 80s steel frame for 2 day event?

This will be my longest ride to date. Roughly 200 miles. I have an option to ride it in one day or break it up into 2. I normally ride centuries on my race bike but it has no provisions for racks and I will need to carry my own supplies for this one which brings us to an 84 Peugeot ph11.
I restored it for my father but he's given it to me as his riding drop bar bike days are over. I've not really ridden the bike more than a few miles. It's completely original besides tires so at a minimum it will need a wheel/ brake upgrade. The old rigida/helicomatic set up just can't compare to decent alloy clinchers.
Do i try and find a bag set up for the race bike or do I try and set up the Peugeot?
stykthyn is offline  
Old 12-21-19, 07:37 PM
  #2  
Steamer
Zircon Encrusted Tweezers
 
Steamer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: high ground
Posts: 1,182
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 31 Posts
Ride your regular bike.
Steamer is offline  
Likes For Steamer:
Old 12-21-19, 08:11 PM
  #3  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 20,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 527 Times in 389 Posts
Originally Posted by stykthyn View Post
I've not really ridden the bike more than a few miles.
I don't really recognize that model, but you answered your own question with this sentence. Until you have ridden this bike relatively long distances, you are better off with your other bike.
unterhausen is offline  
Old 12-21-19, 08:12 PM
  #4  
billridesbikes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Liked 135 Times in 79 Posts
Train on and use your regular bike. I plan on a stop every 25-35 miles for water and food stuffs so examine the route for 5-7 good stops for food and water. If you’re doing it in two days one of these stops will be where you’re sleeping. At distances between 100-200 miles I use a small top tube bag for batteries, phones, and extra snacks, a saddle bag for tools and tubes, and stuff every else in jersey pockets.
billridesbikes is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 09:41 AM
  #5  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 20,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 527 Times in 389 Posts
It occurred to me that the OP wanted to approach this like a short tour. If it's a one time thing, then whatever is cheaper. If switching bikes, then due care should be taken to match contact points as best as possible. You can go a long way on bikepacking bags, and that might be the cheapest optiong
unterhausen is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 12:57 PM
  #6  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,214

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 491 Post(s)
Liked 228 Times in 169 Posts
Originally Posted by stykthyn View Post
This will be my longest ride to date. Roughly 200 miles. I have an option to ride it in one day or break it up into 2. I normally ride centuries on my race bike but it has no provisions for racks and I will need to carry my own supplies for this one which brings us to an 84 Peugeot ph11.
I restored it for my father but he's given it to me as his riding drop bar bike days are over. I've not really ridden the bike more than a few miles. It's completely original besides tires so at a minimum it will need a wheel/ brake upgrade. The old rigida/helicomatic set up just can't compare to decent alloy clinchers.
Do i try and find a bag set up for the race bike or do I try and set up the Peugeot?
200 miles is a nice one day ride, like 200 km except with mountains you're likely to want warmer clothes + reflective gear and lights to start before sunrise or end after sunset.

Get a big bikepacking saddle bag or use p-clamps to mount a top case accepting rack on your racing bike.

You want to do that because the fit works for you, modern hood shapes are comfortable, and brake/shift levers are nice.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 12:57 PM
  #7  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 7,120

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1814 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 257 Times in 218 Posts
Assuming the race bike has a carbon seatpost, I would assume that you could put on an aluminum seatpost and one of those beam type racks that clamp onto the seatpost. Can strap a drybag onto one of those racks or a larger sized rack top bag. They are light weight and cheap. A friend of mine did week long credit card tours with a rack top bag to hold his spare set of clothes, rain gear and toiletries.

I personally do not like friction downtube shifter on the rear, the more hills and gear shifts and I like them even less. I have no clue if the older bike has friction shifters or not, it is in that transition range of time so maybe it does. If you do not mind friction shifters, then this is a non-issue.

The race bike has some miles on it, so you presumably are comfortable on that bike and you have set it up to fit well. But would this route have the same type of gearing you need or would this route have some steeper hills?

What is the likelihood that your 80s vintage bike could have a mechanical? You know the bike, is it sufficiently well maintained?
Tourist in MSN is online now  
Old 12-22-19, 03:32 PM
  #8  
clasher
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,568
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 34 Posts
I've toured on a carbon roadie before, just use some bikepacking gear to carry whatever, i didn't carry a lot of stuff but had enough for 9 days on the road, living in hotels.
clasher is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 08:12 PM
  #9  
atwl77
Kamen Rider
 
atwl77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: KL, MY
Posts: 805

Bikes: Fuji Transonic Elite, Marechal Soul Ultimate, Dahon Dash Altena

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 264 Post(s)
Liked 122 Times in 75 Posts
Agree with the advice of using your regular race bike. Fit and comfort is king, familiarity with your bike comes second place. 200 miles is a nice 1-day ride at audax pace; I don't really pack much for that, don't really need a bikepacking bag for such a ride. Deciding to ride two days, on the other hand, depends on where you'll be stopping mid-point, e.g. is there a hotel, some supported accommodation, or not? Plan on bringing only essentials depending on how you're handling the overnight stay but I doubt you'll need anything more than a 6-10L bag for this kind of short stay -- unless you need to bring some kind of camping gear like a sleeping bag or bivy or tent.
atwl77 is offline  
Old 12-23-19, 06:32 PM
  #10  
stykthyn
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 330
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 131 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Im super keen to make it a 1 day trip. Will be a long day in the saddle but my partner is very much against this. We both ride at the same pace and im confident we could finish in 12 hours or less but he's worried about incidentals and riding unfamiliar roads at night. Soooo 2 days it is. The race bike just makes sense. While the vintage vine ticks all the boxes on paper it's antiquated geometry and parts really puts me at a disadvantage compared to my go to bike. It has a beefy 31.6 alloy seat post so hanging gear from it is no concerne. Not sure if this will become a regular activity so I'm looking to keep costs low. RockBros has a saddle bag in the size I need for around 50 dollars. I know that company isn't known for quality, but I may just use it the once. Any feedback for decent carrying options on the cheap?
stykthyn is offline  
Old 12-24-19, 09:21 AM
  #11  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,285

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1450 Post(s)
Liked 243 Times in 160 Posts
Originally Posted by stykthyn View Post
...Any feedback for decent carrying options on the cheap?
I've used a gallon ziplock and a toe-clip strap before. Can't get any cheaper than that, and it kinda worked ok. This one's under twenty bucks. It will probably last 2 days, but aliexpress is always a bit of a gamble.
kingston is offline  
Old 12-24-19, 10:59 AM
  #12  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 20,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 527 Times in 389 Posts
First time I rode over 200 miles, I used a clip on handlebar bag and a backpack. A good hydration pack is nice because they get the bag away from your back somehow. I have an Osprey.

Originally Posted by stykthyn View Post
While the vintage vine ticks all the boxes on paper it's antiquated geometry and parts really puts me at a disadvantage compared to my go to bike.
I can't imagine it actually has antiquated geometer that is outside the norm for modern geometry. Maybe it has a bit more rake, but the fact that most bikes nowadays have 45mm rake is a reflection of mindless conformity.
unterhausen is offline  
Old 12-29-19, 09:51 AM
  #13  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,214

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 491 Post(s)
Liked 228 Times in 169 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Assuming the race bike has a carbon seatpost, I would assume that you could put on an aluminum seatpost and one of those beam type racks that clamp onto the seatpost. Can strap a drybag onto one of those racks or a larger sized rack top bag. They are light weight and cheap. A friend of mine did week long credit card tours with a rack top bag to hold his spare set of clothes, rain gear and toiletries.
Most have giant clamps which can rub on your thighs. I only found once which cleared.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 12-30-19, 03:54 PM
  #14  
ThermionicScott 
7-speed cultist
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 20,062

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2785 Post(s)
Liked 708 Times in 499 Posts
Ride an 80's bike if you like 80's bikes, not because other people do.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 12-31-19, 12:58 AM
  #15  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,192

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1128 Post(s)
Liked 680 Times in 481 Posts
What kind of rear dropouts does your bike have?

If they're the ones with a small open triangle in them then you can use a regular rear rack if you use a T-nut and nylon washer to hold the lower leg of the rack to the bike. Blackburn used to make a set for this very purpose.





Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 12-31-19, 08:10 AM
  #16  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 20,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 527 Times in 389 Posts
last time I looked someone still sells those. Not sure it really helps the op in his quest to save money
unterhausen is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.