Notices
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

2021 Century-A-Month Club

Old 03-02-21, 06:17 PM
  #26  
OnTheTarmac
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by DocJames View Post
What's the route like from a safety and traffic standpoint? Wide shoulders?

Planning at least one (will probably be more) trip to Florida this year myself. Have been there many times, but never with a bike.
Highly recommend it! This was my first bike trip in FL. I was on route A1A for pretty much the entire ride. Overall, did 215 miles over a few days, most of it was up and down that road, with a few detours. Coming from Philly, I was happy being in the sun so I didn't care that I was being repetitive.
The bike lane is wide and drivers stay out of it. Even more surprisingly, the cars respect the speed limit and generally let you merge, turn, etc politely. I had a close call with a beachgoer walking out between the cars not looking. Traffic is steady and often congested in the busy areas, but not dangerous. As you get farther away from Ft Lauderdale the roads become much nicer, with more scenery and far less traffic. The only problem is it's about 20 miles to get out of the busy FTL area so if you want to do short/medium rides, you have to deal with cars and the usual resort area commotion.

The stretch between Delray and Palm Beach was the best part, but like I said is ~20 miles north of FTL. Delray is a quaint little beach town, if I was going again I would stay there.

Once you get a few blocks from the water, it's like riding in a busy city, so best to stick to the barrier islands.
OnTheTarmac is offline  
Old 03-03-21, 02:38 AM
  #27  
joewein
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
joewein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Posts: 592

Bikes: Elephant Bikes National Forest Explorer, Bike Friday Pocket Rocket

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by 2WheelsNYC View Post
Thanks Joe! After using the B17 for awhile, do other saddles give you any trouble? I have a new bike with a B17 this year, and have about 1k miles on it. I recently rode my previous setup and immediately noticed some discomfort.
I wouldn't know if other saddles now give me trouble as both of my bikes use a B17.

A lot of saddles are OK for 50 km. People like soft saddles on shopping bikes, but those become very uncomfortable at longer distances (same with soft car seats).

Last edited by joewein; 03-08-21 at 07:10 AM.
joewein is offline  
Old 03-08-21, 08:31 AM
  #28  
joewein
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
joewein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Posts: 592

Bikes: Elephant Bikes National Forest Explorer, Bike Friday Pocket Rocket

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 45 Posts


215 km with 1600 m of elevation gain (on Strava). It was a team training ride for our upcoming Flèche on the first April weekend (Easter weekend). I am now at 103 consecutive months of CaM.

The planned route would have taken us over the Hakone volcano at around 1000 m above sea level (3300 ft) but after a significant temperature drop from the day before even at low elevation on the coast it was colder than I expected, with a low of 4 deg C (39F) and it never reached 10 deg C (50F). I had enough spare clothes with me to deal with that, but my teammates were very uncomfortable. So we end up not climbing to Hakone and descending to Yugawara from there but took the coastal road instead. I suggested visiting the Manazuru peninsula, since I had always bypassed it by following the main road (N135) or the high road (K740) on the way to and from Atami and that was also how our planned route had been. So we did that and explored the peninsula, which offers nice views of the coastline north and south of it.



On the way back to the original route we passed a couple of restaurants and picked one seafood restaurant for lunch. There were people only on one other table, but they finished and left by the time we got our food. The meal was nice and reasonably priced.



We returned to Odawara via the high road over Manazuru (K740) which has very little traffic . You ride past terraced fields with mikan (satsuma orange) orchards. We passed a couple of roadside mikan shops selling local citrus fruit. They must be losing a lot of business without the tourists. But at least Manazuru is still within Kanagawa (as are Hakone and Yugawara) so Kanagawa residents who try to avoid visiting prefectures not subject to the State of Emergency can still go there. This was how our ride was designed, between two opposite borders of Kanagawa (Tamagawa to Tokyo and Yugawara to Shizuoka).



On the last training ride I had felt it a challenge to keep up with the ride leader during the first 1/4 of the ride, but felt comfortable during the rest of the ride. This time it was more like the opposite: The initial pace felt comfortable, but after the first stop it became harder and stayed that way. But I think it was a very successful training ride. Things went more smoothly and without incidents. I think we're getting the hang of successfully riding as a group.



In two weeks we'll do another training ride. Two weeks after that will be the real Flèche event (360+ km in 24h), assuming it's not again postponed to the autumn due to Covid like in 2020. But half the fun in a Flèche is training for it as a team in the months leading up to it.
joewein is offline  
Likes For joewein:
Old 03-09-21, 11:31 PM
  #29  
ooga-booga
lead on, macduff!
 
ooga-booga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: san diego (uni/normal heights), california
Posts: 6,227

Bikes: 85 pinarello treviso steel, 88 nishiki olympic steel. 95 look kg 131 carbon, 11 trek madone 5.2 carbon

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 977 Post(s)
Liked 1,245 Times in 670 Posts
finished up the march account. 119 miles from fullerton (about 10 miles east of dtown los angeles) back to san diego. took the earliest amtrak train up to fullerton. pretty windy in the first half of the ride but the second half was mostly glorious tailwind. temps mostly in the low-60f with scattered clouds. did the ride on the 1988 nishiki olympic (steel) bike. much of the climbing in the first half of the ride.

https://strava.app.link/oH3ko85jveb[img]blob:https://www.bikeforums.net/e04d17e0-db11-4706-b445-5f36fbdc03e5[/img]







ooga-booga is offline  
Old 03-13-21, 06:51 PM
  #30  
Bulette
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 85
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 19 Posts
Deadlines and disruptions have limited my riding, so I was excited to set out on a March century -- I even chose the touring bike to add some extra saddle time. The forecast was ~60-70°F, but with near full overcast and morning showers; the rain wasn't going to stop me (but it might have slowed me down). Wanting some elevation, I set a route into the hill country.



45 miles into the ride, I found myself in Dripping Springs. I stopped to stage a photo in front of the parkway (which offers a very pleasant few miles), then circled town to find my favorite type of lunch: apple fritters, custard-filled long johns, and coffee!



After lunch, it was back the way I came -- it really is a great route. There are plenty of hills (and overall elevation gain), but the typical grades are manageable; best of all, there is hardly any other traffic on the backroads.



Of course, once you get to Wimberley and the Blanco River valley, you have to climb out of the valley to get back home -- the road can be seen off in the distance: it sustains 17-19% grades for far too long. (I also managed to aggravate some fire-ants for the picture, which added just a bit of extra discomfort for the already challenging climb).



All told, it was a very satisfying day out on the bike. Unfortunately, the rain did make a mess of things, so I had some cleaning to do before I could hang up my hat.


Last edited by Bulette; 03-13-21 at 06:55 PM.
Bulette is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 07:43 AM
  #31  
2WheelsNYC
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 7 Posts
March - Bear Mountian

Went to the top of Bear Mountain, NY -- my first trip up there. Temps for most of the ride was freezing with a lot of head wind. Met up with a local group who were very encouraging.

Most of the trek takes place along the famous route 9W.



Made it to the top!

2WheelsNYC is offline  
Old 03-21-21, 07:54 AM
  #32  
OnTheTarmac
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 7 Posts
Rode aimlessly around Chester County, PA trying to decide if it was worth riding in 35 degree weather. Eventually went south to Delaware and briefly into Maryland before heading back. It started to warm up by mile 60 and I was able to hit the gas.
OnTheTarmac is offline  
Old 03-22-21, 12:37 PM
  #33  
Cycletography
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Gulf Coast, Florida
Posts: 262

Bikes: Electra Townie, Surly Ogre, Basso Palta

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Liked 131 Times in 71 Posts
February & March Centuries

I waited until the last day in February to complete my century, but it was a lot of fun. My first year participating in Piggy's Revenge and my first "gravel" event. It won't be my last. Unfortunately, no photos.




So far this was/is longest century ride for 2021. I'll be riding with a group of folks from my local club across Florida in mid-April. We're going from Cocoa Beach to Wiki Wachee, which is about 167 miles. For some reason I decided that trip was "epic enough" so I decided to ride across Florida to ride across Florida . It'll be a 4-day trip leaving from Sarasota. On Day 1 I'm going from Sarasota to Ft. Pierce; Day 2 is Ft. Pierce to Cocoa Beach; Day 3 is the group ride from Cocoa Beach to Wiki Wachee; and on Day 4 I'll ride from Wiki Wachee back to Sarasota. Should be a lot of fun!

Last edited by Cycletography; 03-22-21 at 12:41 PM. Reason: adding a title
Cycletography is offline  
Likes For Cycletography:
Old 03-24-21, 11:33 AM
  #34  
Brett A
Word.
 
Brett A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Rural New England
Posts: 178

Bikes: Surly Disc Trucker, Specialized Roubaix, Felt fat bike (5" studded), DB Sortie Black 29er trail bike, many, many others out in the barn.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 31 Posts
I did my 15th consecutive monthly century yesterday.
It was slow-going, as a good percentage of the ride was on waterlogged dirt roads -like riding through glue. For example, my average speed for the 10 mile descent down the Green River (see mile 38 to 48 in elevation profile below) was 5 mph. Also, there was just over 6k feet of climbing which is nearly tops the list so far.

I took these photos along the Green River road:


Guilford, VT

Much of the day was on roads like this







Full fenders keep mud off the drive train as well as my feet, legs and back. This photo was taken around mile 60, after at least 20 miles of muddy roads.


I do own a 19 pound bike (a carbon Roubaix) yet I always do these rides on a 50+ pound (with food and water) Surly touring bike. I'm never in a hurry and I like to settle in like a long road trip in the car.


Last edited by Brett A; 03-24-21 at 11:37 AM.
Brett A is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 07:11 PM
  #35  
Bulette
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 85
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 19 Posts
Technically, this story begins in March. Thanks to riding with a buddy, a quick return trip to Dripping Springs blossomed into a full-blown century ride (a bonus March century for me). Throughout the ride, we quipped about getting "lost" in the Hill Country. Of course, there's not many alternate routes in those hills, and we never really did get lost. That was one week ago today.




Fast-forward to today: same buddy, same plan, different route. This time, we'd try and get lost in the gravel roads that intersperse the fields of the Blackland Prairie, east of the Balcones escarpment. We'd succeed too.




A check of the weather on Friday night suggested cool temperatures and a slight mist, but otherwise a great day -- not having to worry about excessive sun and carrying gallons of water is always a relief in Texas. So, we set to convene Saturday morning around eight.

Just as expected, the morning was cool, but pleasantly overcast and dry. We set off along the route, and covered a solid 30 miles; at one point, a mild -- but expected -- mist set on; in the distance, lightning marked a brewing thundershower. Nonetheless, our route was dry enough, we were headed away from the dark skies, and the wind was clearing the skies ahead. We should have stopped for more pictures but we were making good time, and before we knew it, we hit the lunch stop.



Lunch wasn't much but the typical convenience store fare, but it satisfied all the same. Warm pizza was slightly better than my usual choices and felt good on the cool day. As we ate, a downdraft and a strong drizzle set in -- I got a chill, but was determined all the same. Besides, a little rain might keep the dust down.

We set off and, at first, the rain seemed to let up. The pavement just out of town was damp, but the tires weren't kicking up much spray. That, of course, didn't last. Within ten miles of lunch, the rain was starting to soak through clothes and shoes -- at least the temperature held strong above 50°F. Once we turned back onto the gravel though, conditions started to deteriorate. The rain became steady, but worse, the ground became soft and the sandy-gravel started to spray -- feet, derailleurs, and back. "I have muck on my shoulders!"

We dutifully followed the cues on our planned route: a turn down Oil Field Road and a search for an 'unnamed' road. Well, we found the road, and a gate. It said nothing about no trespassing, and it might have been passable (there are a lot of public roads behind gates around here), but we felt it better to head back the way we came. The cue sheet was useless now, as were the cell phones... no service deep in the fields.

It was a slog back up the road, where our tires had already dug half-inch deep ruts; now we were sure to be lost. Luckily, our fancy bike computers have a compass to keep us going towards home, at least generally; we picked a myriad of turns -- a left here, a right there -- anything to avoid the main highways (and, even despite the increasingly sloppy conditions, preferring the gravel roads). It was around mile 75 that we finally checked for cell service and a map; even the most direct route was likely well over 25 miles, and we were starting to run short of food and water: according to the original plan, we should have been in Lockhart around mile 70. I snapped a quick picture to text to the folks at home, to let them know I was running late.



A few more guesswork turns, and we finally reached Lockhart around mile 85. The station there was a welcome, nearly necessary relief. We knew where we were once again and could figure exactly how far it was home. Even better, the sun started to peak through clouds, the rain decided to pass over, and the wind stirred at our backs. I celebrated with ice cream.

All in all, we made it home under 110 miles (from a planned route at just 90 miles). The muck left brake pads and chains howling, but otherwise, it was a dashingly successful ride: we got lost, we bested the weather, and we scored a few bonus miles, too. Most of my centuries have ended flat at 101 or 102 miles -- thanks to the bravado of a buddy, I can say this ride was perhaps a bit more memorable. (I'll certainly be remembering all next week, as I slowly tear down, clean, and rebuild my bike!)


Last edited by Bulette; 04-03-21 at 08:55 PM.
Bulette is offline  
Likes For Bulette:
Old 04-04-21, 01:19 AM
  #36  
ooga-booga
lead on, macduff!
 
ooga-booga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: san diego (uni/normal heights), california
Posts: 6,227

Bikes: 85 pinarello treviso steel, 88 nishiki olympic steel. 95 look kg 131 carbon, 11 trek madone 5.2 carbon

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 977 Post(s)
Liked 1,245 Times in 670 Posts
Originally Posted by Bulette View Post
Technically, this story begins in March. Thanks to riding with a buddy, a quick return trip to Dripping Springs blossomed into a full-blown century ride (a bonus March century for me). Throughout the ride, we quipped about getting "lost" in the Hill Country. Of course, there's not many alternate routes in those hills, and we never really did get lost. That was one week ago today.




Fast-forward to today: same buddy, same plan, different route. This time, we'd try and get lost in the gravel roads that intersperse the fields of the Blackland Prairie, east of the Balcones escarpment. We'd succeed too.




A check of the weather on Friday night suggested cool temperatures and a slight mist, but otherwise a great day -- not having to worry about excessive sun and carrying gallons of water is always a relief in Texas. So, we set to convene Saturday morning around eight.

Just as expected, the morning was cool, but pleasantly overcast and dry. We set off along the route, and covered a solid 30 miles; at one point, a mild -- but expected -- mist set on; in the distance, lightning marked a brewing thundershower. Nonetheless, our route was dry enough, we were headed away from the dark skies, and the wind was clearing the skies ahead. We should have stopped for more pictures but we were making good time, and before we knew it, we hit the lunch stop.



Lunch wasn't much but the typical convenience store fare, but it satisfied all the same. Warm pizza was slightly better than my usual choices and felt good on the cool day. As we ate, a downdraft and a strong drizzle set in -- I got a chill, but was determined all the same. Besides, a little rain might keep the dust down.

We set off and, at first, the rain seemed to let up. The pavement just out of town was damp, but the tires weren't kicking up much spray. That, of course, didn't last. Within ten miles of lunch, the rain was starting to soak through clothes and shoes -- at least the temperature held strong above 50°F. Once we turned back onto the gravel though, conditions started to deteriorate. The rain became steady, but worse, the ground became soft and the sandy-gravel started to spray -- feet, derailleurs, and back. "I have muck on my shoulders!"

We dutifully followed the cues on our planned route: a turn down Oil Field Road and a search for an 'unnamed' road. Well, we found the road, and a gate. It said nothing about no trespassing, and it might have been passable (there are a lot of public roads behind gates around here), but we felt it better to head back the way we came. The cue sheet was useless now, as were the cell phones... no service deep in the fields.

It was a slog back up the road, where our tires had already dug half-inch deep ruts; now we were sure to be lost. Luckily, our fancy bike computers have a compass to keep us going towards home, at least generally; we picked a myriad of turns -- a left here, a right there -- anything to avoid the main highways (and, even despite the increasingly sloppy conditions, preferring the gravel roads). It was around mile 75 that we finally checked for cell service and a map; even the most direct route was likely well over 25 miles, and we were starting to run short of food and water: according to the original plan, we should have been in Lockhart around mile 70. I snapped a quick picture to text to the folks at home, to let them know I was running late.



A few more guesswork turns, and we finally reached Lockhart around mile 85. The station there was a welcome, nearly necessary relief. We knew where we were once again and could figure exactly how far it was home. Even better, the sun started to peak through clouds, the rain decided to pass over, and the wind stirred at our backs. I celebrated with ice cream.

All in all, we made it home under 110 miles (from a planned route at just 90 miles). The muck left brake pads and chains howling, but otherwise, it was a dashingly successful ride: we got lost, we bested the weather, and we scored a few bonus miles, too. Most of my centuries have ended flat at 101 or 102 miles -- thanks to the bravado of a buddy, I can say this ride was perhaps a bit more memorable. (I'll certainly be remembering all next week, as I slowly tear down, clean, and rebuild my bike!)

a true, epic adventure. ones like this are truly savored vs just cranking out a long ride. what's a proper adventure without a bit of mischief involved?
ooga-booga is offline  
Old 04-05-21, 01:35 AM
  #37  
joewein
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
joewein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Posts: 592

Bikes: Elephant Bikes National Forest Explorer, Bike Friday Pocket Rocket

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 45 Posts
I survived my second Flèche ride from Toyohashi in Aichi prefecture back to Tokyo (on Strava) and my third Flèche overall.

Although we officially did not finish again, I rode 401 km altogether from Saturday morning to Sunday afternoon, including the entire 368 km route as planned, just not within the set hours. A Flèche is a randonneuring event where teams of 3 to 5 machines (tandems only count once) ride at least 360 km in 24 hours towards a central location / meeting point. At least 25 km have to be covered after hour 22 of the 24 hour ride. It was organised by AR Nihonbashi.

We used almost the same course again, only the part close to Tokyo was different. The biggest difference overall was that it didn't rain all day on Saturday as it had last year. Therefore I rode the whole day in shorts instead of in rain gear and the temperature was much more pleasant too.

To get to the start, I drove to Aichi by car the day before (I can't rinko my Elephant Bikes NFE). I was joined by my wife and my son. Together we visited Cape Irago (Iragomisaki) on the Atsumi peninsula of southern Aichi. After dropping me off they drove back to Tokyo. The peninsula is beautiful. I was impressed by the natural forests that are a sprinkle of different colors, unlike around Tokyo where much of the current forests are regrown mono-cultures planted after post war clearcutting.

I had dinner with two other team members, then went to bed at 21:00.



The alarm went off at 05:15 and we assembled at 06:00 to get the bikes ready.

It was a 20 minute ride to the official start at a 7-11 on the outskirts, where we set off at 07:00. We head a very pleasant tailwind on our ride through farm country out to Iragomisaki, where we uploaded a group picture in front of a road sign to prove passage.

The view from the road next to the Irako View Hotel was breathtaking. You could see the coast of Mie prefecture on the other side of the entrance to Ise Bay and various islands in the sea. I took in the view but we didn't stop for a picture. Here's a picture from Wikipedia (By Bariston - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/inde...curid=62146068):



We headed into the headwind that would be blowing in our faces for the next 120 km. Sometimes we took turns leading the ride. Many of the farmhouses had a storehouse between it and the coastal side, probably to block the wind.



There were also many greenhouses. Regardless of shape and size, glass or plastic they all seemed to have fuel oil tanks with the JA logo (Japan Agricultural Cooperatives), so it's a safe bet that JA sells most of the fuel oil consumed to help grow crops in the cold season. Lots of signs advertising melons which are currently out of season but we came across many kei (660cc micro) trucks loaded with cabbages.



There were many wind turbines in Aichi and also Shizuoka, as well as many photovoltaic installations. Their ubiquity there highlighted for me how few of them we have in Tokyo and Kanagawa. Perhaps Chubu Power is easier to deal with for feed ins than Tepco is, especially for wind power.

At noon we stopped for lunch at a ramen and gyoza place about halfway between Cape Irago and Omaezaki.

As we passed the former Hamaoka nuclear power station (it is permanently shut down) we were passed by a group of three cyclists on shopping bikes. Actually, one was a hybrid bike with flat bars while the other two were bona-fide shopping bikes. It was team ”machari wa rongu yuki!" ("Shopping bikes are suitable for long rides!") running in the AR Nihonbashi event and they were steaming ahead of us.

We got to Omaezaki a little after 16:00. By then it was a Century ride (160.9 km / 100 mi), but not even half of what we had set out to do.



As the course turned north here, the headwind ceased and became more of a tailwind again. It got dark near Shizuoka City.



I had felt a bit sleepy after lunch but then felt OK again. Over the next couple of hours others became sleepy as we were riding through the dark and it became more and more of a problem.

I wasn't able to see Mt Fuji on the drive on Tomei expressway on Friday because of low clouds and now I couldn't see it because it was night time. After crossing Fuji city and Numazu we started our climb in Izu towards Atami toge. When we finally got to the top, we had to take another power nap break. We put on all our extra clothes for the steep descent down to Atami on the side (13 percent). After that my rear disk brake, which recently had been very noisy and not very effective (maybe due to oil contamination from the chain) has been working perfectly again, as the heat and wear effectively decontaminated it.

Dawn approached as we headed from Atami to Yugawara and Manazuru.



We had burnt up most of our time buffer for the sleep break planned at the 22 hour stop by then, but the sleepiness in the team only got worse. So after another long break at Manazuru we sent in our DNF-notification to the event organiser. We headed to Odawara and had breakfast at the station.

After that, my friends packed their bikes for the train home while I continued on the planned route to Yamato/Kanagawa, then another 26 km to my home in Tokyo. I also needed a few naps to get me home safely.



With this ride, I now have 104 contiguous months of Century a Month. I may join a 400 km brevet later this spring and a 200 km brevet or two again after the summer.

As for the Flèche that we DNF'ed twice now, let's see what we can up with next year. We may just try it again a third time :-)
joewein is offline  
Likes For joewein:
Old 04-29-21, 08:09 PM
  #38  
2WheelsNYC
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 7 Posts
NYC to Philadelphia (145mi, 160mi total). Longest distance I've gone so far. Heard about a local group that does very long rides, so I decided to join them the day before. They were super friendly and helpful, a real nice riding group. We started with about 40 people... some would meet along route, some had to drop out and in the end about half reached the destination. There were all types of riders, a wide range of bikes (a handful of single speed riders) but all were pretty capable.



The map:


View of NYC from across the Hudson



Had a wild crash and somehow I landed on my feet. At about 17 mph, my front caught an embedded train track, which threw the rear of the bike up. The rest of the bike would swing 180 degrees but the crank landed right on a curb. That broke my momentum and I landed in a crouching position. There's a small dent on the rim below that gash, and my seat was pointed all the way down.



Anyway, most of us took the train back and we were greeted with rain. I had brought along a Brooks seat cover and it did not fare very well, so rode the last 8 miles standing up. No regrets.
2WheelsNYC is offline  
Likes For 2WheelsNYC:
Old 05-03-21, 08:34 PM
  #39  
OnTheTarmac
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 7 Posts
Got the April ride in on the 30th. Rode up and down the Schuylkill River Trail between Valley Forge and Manayunk. Stopped for some food then rode home. Very windy day.
OnTheTarmac is offline  
Old 05-04-21, 04:20 AM
  #40  
2WheelsNYC
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 7 Posts
Rapha's "A Day in Hell", Redux.

The cycling club Rapha had their gravel ride last month, which I was only able to do the shorter route. With a free day and my gravel wheelset ready, I took the opportunity to give their "advanced" course a go. It turned out to be a great ride, and as with most gravel routes starting from NYC, you need to go 15-20 miles before you get to anything good.








2WheelsNYC is offline  
Likes For 2WheelsNYC:
Old 05-04-21, 12:29 PM
  #41  
Brett A
Word.
 
Brett A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Rural New England
Posts: 178

Bikes: Surly Disc Trucker, Specialized Roubaix, Felt fat bike (5" studded), DB Sortie Black 29er trail bike, many, many others out in the barn.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 31 Posts
~


My 16th consecutive monthly century was as enjoyable as the others. This time I believe I did more miles on dirt than in the past. The Strava total was low as I can never seem to keep the thing running accurately for 16 hours. My old-school magnet-pulse computer is reliable and says 109.3 miles at 9.64 mph.








The first 25 miles or-so was on dirt. Much of it in the Quabbin reservoir, and some on Trustees land, including four miles of rocky single track I usually mountain bike on. The Quabbin consists of seven villages the state took by eminent domain and flooded in 1938 as Boston's water supply. So there are a lot of roads that once saw cars, now preserved in time. (Some of them are paved)



.



This is a bit of the single track I usually ride on my trail bike. Riding this rigid 26" steel bike through these rock gardens reminded me of what mountain biking used to be like.



I first starting riding this particular trail in 1985. I've muscled many now-ancient bikes over these rocks.This Surly Trucker's bottom bracket is way too low for this.



.

It wasn't all dirt. The other 60% or-so of the ride was on old farm roads like this:



That's the French King Bridge over the Connecticut River in Erving, MA. The bridge I'm standing on is where the Miller's River empties into it.




I wore my chest strap HRM just for yuks. I thought it was pretty good to have spent more than thirteen hours up over 60 percent max heart rate. (The three hours unaccounted for on the wrist unit would have been below zone one).





This is an old garage that has fallen down around an old truck.


Last edited by Brett A; 05-05-21 at 07:29 AM.
Brett A is offline  
Likes For Brett A:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.