Notices
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

What makes a surly LHT good for long distance?

Old 02-14-09, 10:39 PM
  #26  
InTheRain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,982

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 141 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 6 Posts
I have a touring bike (rocky mountain sherpa 30) that is a steel frame and I run 28 mm tires. It's a comfortable bike. I've ridden it on long distance rides (well, 200 miles... that's about my max for a day.) I also have a carbon frame cannondale synapse. The synapse has a little more relaxed geometry than a true racing frame. I also have the seat and saddle at nearly the same height. When I do distance rides, I swap out the saddle (brooks b-17) from my touring bike. The synapse will take up to 28mm tires. I love riding the synapse on longer rides. It is fairly comfortable and much more efficient than my touring bike.

The synapse is good for single day distance rides. I wouldn't recommend it for something where you have to carry alot of gear. No braze-ons for racks. I use a carradice saddle bag that works great with the brooks saddle. I have an Ortlieb handlebar bag for the front. I can carry everything I need for a one day ride in these two bags. The synapse comes in at just under 22lbs with all the gear when I have it set up this way. The only other concern I have with the synapse is fenders. I know that many randoneurring groups in the Northwest really encourage fenders for the courtesy of other riders. I know that I can get race blades on the synapse pretty easily, but setting it up with full fenders and mud flaps... i'm not sure. I haven't been on any long distance bad weather rides with the synapse. The fenders and mud flaps are a courtesy to the other riders.

If it's more than a one day ride and I'm carrying more gear for sleeping/camping then I take the touring bike. It will be slower and heavier but it's made for comfort and carrying gear.

The OP talked about doing long distance rides such as centuries. I believe that a lighter more efficient bike would be the way to go rides as short as centuries. If you plan on going more than that (200+ miles and multi-day rides), then you probably want a true rando bike. I don't think you can find one that is a good quality ride, reasonably light, and with all the braze-ons and specific geometry for under $1000.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 02-14-09, 11:40 PM
  #27  
Six jours
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 6,401
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
I realize this is out of the OPs price range -- although it probably is not if he gives up his foolish (IMO) plan to buy a cheap bike now and a good bike later -- but I believe the Ebisu All-Purpose is a nearly perfect LD frame and an outrageous deal for a hand-built best-quality lugged steel frameset. It's also a frame that gives up little to the exotic racing bikes and is markedly better than things like the Co-Motion, Surly, etc.
Six jours is offline  
Old 02-15-09, 12:10 PM
  #28  
mattm
**** that
 
mattm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: CALI
Posts: 15,401
Mentioned: 151 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1097 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by Six jours View Post
I realize this is out of the OPs price range -- although it probably is not if he gives up his foolish (IMO) plan to buy a cheap bike now and a good bike later -- but I believe the Ebisu All-Purpose is a nearly perfect LD frame and an outrageous deal for a hand-built best-quality lugged steel frameset. It's also a frame that gives up little to the exotic racing bikes and is markedly better than things like the Co-Motion, Surly, etc.
at least for me, it took a couple of bikes to figure out what i really liked/needed/wanted in a bike.

no sense in starting out with one expensive bike and hoping you'll be happy on it for the next 4+ years... i think it's a good idea to start small (e.g. get a cheaper bike now), then figure out what you want later.

you see, if you don't know what you want (or need), how can one settle on one bike?
__________________
cat 1.

my race videos
mattm is offline  
Old 02-15-09, 12:45 PM
  #29  
Six jours
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 6,401
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
That's a valid point. But then I've been playing with bicycles for several decades and still haven't figured out what I want. Or at least, I always think I have, but then I end up buying/making more bicycles anyway!

My POV is that buying a bike you know isn't the one you'll end up keeping is a waste of money. And I reject any opinion that doesn't agree with mine.
Six jours is offline  
Old 02-16-09, 01:06 PM
  #30  
lutz
Senior Member
 
lutz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NorCal
Posts: 302
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A great "almost low price" alternative are currently hand-built lugged steel British bikes - thanks to the currency fluctuations. Have a look at Bob Jackson bicycles or even Mercian.

https://www.bobjacksoncycles.co.uk/
https://www.bobjacksoncycles.co.uk/de...74b2ca731ccb05
https://www.merciancycles.co.uk/frames.asp (King of Mercia or Audax Special)

Last edited by lutz; 02-16-09 at 02:44 PM.
lutz is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.