Notices
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

Brevet Etiquette

Old 01-26-11, 09:23 PM
  #1  
StephenH
Uber Goober
Thread Starter
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,738
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 22 Posts
Brevet Etiquette

Just curious what your thoughts are on the following situations…specifically relating to randonneuring brevets:
  • New rider shows up, first ride, slower than everyone else- you take off anyway? Ride with ‘em a while, then take off? Ride with ‘em the whole way?
  • You catch up with another regular rider who is about your speed. They’re not unfriendly, but don’t seem to care whether you ride with them or not. Ride with them a ways and head on, ride with them a long time, just pass ‘em and be done with it or what?
  • A regular rider seems to be having trouble and is going slower than normal. Head on, check with them and head on, stay with them?
  • Five or six of the regular guys just happen to be riding in a group. One stops to shed a layer. Others head on or wait up?
  • Five or six of the regular guys just happen to be riding in a group, and are joined by the new guy. After 20 miles, the new guy stops to shed a layer. Others head on or wait up?
  • Another guy catches you and rides with you for 20 miles. At the next control, you get your stuff and are ready to ride, he’s not out yet. You ride on or wait for him?

These don’t necessarily relate to me, although I’ve been on both sides of several of them. I just got to thinking about how some situations ought to be handled.
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Old 01-26-11, 09:37 PM
  #2  
FunkyStickman
On a Mission from God
 
FunkyStickman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Thibodaux, LA
Posts: 2,010

Bikes: '10 Surly LHT, Rat-rod Klunker, '82 Peugeot PH12 Centennial

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've been trying to get a local RUSA member to answer some of these kinds of questions... I'm curious to see what people say.
FunkyStickman is offline  
Old 01-26-11, 09:54 PM
  #3  
valygrl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 8,546
Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here's my take on it - from the perspective of someone who has only done a few short brevets.

I don't think there are rules or etiquette, just don't be a jerk. Also, you could talk about it while it's happening.

There's too many contributing factors to really have a defined etiquette. Terrain, weather, time of day, how close you're cutting it to the time limits, other timing factors (stores closing, night falling), whether anyone cares about getting a fast time, whether you like the particular person(s) involved.

One of the things I personally do not like about brevets is that I like company on long rides, and all those factors can end up making you ride alone or make you not take care of yourself in order to stay with a group that won't wait. The brevet itself becomes more important than other things that I personally value more - like taking care of your friends if their having a tough time, waiting for each other to pee or eat or change clothes, etc.

Some of my brevet friends go out with the goal to stay with their friends and support each other. Others go out to get a fast time, or feel they have to not waste any time for any reason because they are going to be cutting the time limits close. I think the trouble arises when one person thinks the group is doing the former, and others think they are doing the latter. As long as the communication is clear from the beginning, hopefully no feelings will be hurt.

I'm interested to hear what the more experienced folks say.
valygrl is offline  
Old 01-26-11, 10:09 PM
  #4  
SBinNYC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 548
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Brevets are individual rides.

Nobody should expect one rider to jeopardize his chances for finishing a brevet to ride with another. However, unless somebody is planning to finish close to the fastest time allowed, there is no distinction to how long one takes. Translation: if you're not trying to be first, you find good company and you are not in time danger then enjoy the ride together.

One strategy I used for PBP was to get adopted by a French club and ride with them. I told them flat out that my only object was to survive; they were in the same boat.
SBinNYC is offline  
Old 01-26-11, 10:55 PM
  #5  
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 3,370

Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
...[*]New rider shows up, first ride, slower than everyone else- you take off anyway? Ride with ‘em a while, then take off? Ride with ‘em the whole way?
I'll ride with them the whole way. It's actually one of my favorite things to do. It's much easier to learn how to do these things if you've got someone experienced to do it with. I wish someone had done that with me when I first started.

...[*]You catch up with another regular rider who is about your speed. They’re not unfriendly, but don’t seem to care whether you ride with them or not. Ride with them a ways and head on, ride with them a long time, just pass ‘em and be done with it or what?
Some people are just anti-social. For whatever reason they just want to ride by themselves. I'm that way sometimes so it's no big deal.

...[*]A regular rider seems to be having trouble and is going slower than normal. Head on, check with them and head on, stay with them?
I'd stay with them. I won't leave anyone behind unless they ask me to.

...[*]Five or six of the regular guys just happen to be riding in a group. One stops to shed a layer. Others head on or wait up?
If it's just a layer it's rude to drop them. Most people can shed a layer without stopping though...

...[*]Five or six of the regular guys just happen to be riding in a group, and are joined by the new guy. After 20 miles, the new guy stops to shed a layer. Others head on or wait up?
Depends on if he/she wants to ride with us or not.

...[*]Another guy catches you and rides with you for 20 miles. At the next control, you get your stuff and are ready to ride, he’s not out yet. You ride on or wait for him?
If I am riding with someone and we get to a control we usually agree on a time for departure. If that time arrives and they are not ready I will check with them to see when they will be ready to leave. If it's reasonable I'll wait or I'll split.

If you are in a group it's always best to communicate what you are doing as early as possible. I've found groups to be quite nebulous on brevets. The form and dissolve depending on the requirements of the individual riders. It's really not a big deal if everyone is clear up front what they are going to do. If I'm riding with a slow rider I'll stick with them as long as I know I can make the controls. If I determine they aren't going to make it we'll have that discussion at that time. If you're on a long brevet like a 1200k and you escort a injured or DNFing rider into a control and come in late the ride organizers will usually let you ride on and thank you for helping the slower rider. They don't want to have to go out searching for wayward riders.
Homeyba is offline  
Old 01-26-11, 11:11 PM
  #6  
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 3,370

Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SBinNYC View Post
One strategy I used for PBP was to get adopted by a French club and ride with them. I told them flat out that my only object was to survive; they were in the same boat.
Or better yet, steal(trade really) one of their jerseys. Wearing a A.C. Rospez jersey got me a free hotel room in Loudeac.
Homeyba is offline  
Old 01-26-11, 11:17 PM
  #7  
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 2,240

Bikes: Soma Fog Cutter, Volae Team, '74ish Windsor Carrera Sport, Priority Eight, Nimbus MUni, Trek Roscoe 6

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 209 Post(s)
Liked 304 Times in 163 Posts
I see only one option you list that seems potentially rude. The guy who doesn't care if you ride with him or not... if you're wanting someone to chat with, move on.

We should not expect other riders to go out of their way to help, but often they do and it should always be appreciated.
downtube42 is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 12:20 AM
  #8  
timmythology
Senior Member
 
timmythology's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Portland, Or
Posts: 395

Bikes: | Surly Disc-Trucker| unknown city bike |M80 Raleigh |09 Trek 1.2|

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Stephan, thanks for asking this question, it has been informative.
timmythology is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 12:31 AM
  #9  
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,752
Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1439 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 20 Posts
There is a point where slow riders can become a significant liablity to your own needs. I had this experience on the Great Southern 1200 when a Brazilian rider latched on to me. I am normally a solo rider. We left a control at night after a nap, and I could see his light behind me for quite a long time. Then it disappeared, but we got into rollers and then a major downhill to a small township where I waited... and waited... and waited...

Until I thought I could not wait any longer as I would have run out of time for the next control. As it was, I made it in right on time.

Later that afternoon, the guy went past me, hanging out the window of the car. He later told me that despite the sleep at the previous control, he had stopped for a roadside nap, and had slept on.

It was a major PITA, and I had to play catch-up for the rest of the ride.

It was as salient a lesson as any in: Ride Your Own Ride.

Of course, riding as domestic partners puts a somewhat different spin on that, and we "Ride Our Own Ride".
Rowan is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 01:29 AM
  #10  
cheg
Senior Member
 
cheg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 807

Bikes: 2008 Davidson Custom Titanium, Custom Seven Steel Tandem, 1981 Shogun Touring Bike, 1974 Raleigh International

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The rule is that there are no general rules. I don't think it's fair to have expectations about how other riders will or should behave. I've ridden alone, with friends, with strangers. I've waited, been waited for, and ridden alone for hundreds of kilometers. I have helped people to finish and helped people who DNF'd anyway. Ride your ride. Do what you can for other riders but be self reliant.

That said, it's good to ride with someone else at night for safety and to keep the demons of doubt at bay.
cheg is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 02:01 AM
  #11  
robbleebob
Member
 
robbleebob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Chuncheon, South Korea
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I am getting ready to ride my first brevet, however, most of the other riders are very experienced. I am happy to be able to go into the ride with a bit of knowledge of expectations... I will certainly be asking.
Thanks
robbleebob is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 03:08 AM
  #12  
chewybrian 
"Florida Man"
 
chewybrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: East Florida
Posts: 1,665

Bikes: '16 Bob Jackson rando, '66 Raleigh Superbe, 80 Nishiki Maxima, 07 Gary Fisher Utopia, 09 Surly LHT

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1133 Post(s)
Liked 425 Times in 262 Posts
I think the only unwritten rule is that you check on riders you pass who have pulled off the road, to make sure they are o.k.; this is almost universal. I will stop to help if they don't have a tool, pump or a tube, as most other riders will. But, usually they have no need of help.

If you catch up to another rider on the second or third day of the ride, there's a good chance that they are tired or suffering and would appreciate a pull. I have often ridden with riders who are in trouble during the final stages of the ride. I'll wait for them to recover if needed. And, I've had people do the same for me. But, I'll only wait or slow down if my own finish is not in jeopardy, and that's the only way I would expect anyone to wait for me.

Also, the longer you have ridden with a group or another rider, the more proper it is to wait for someone who has a flat or whatever.
__________________
Campione Del Mondo Immaginario
chewybrian is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 05:19 AM
  #13  
seenloitering
Stoker's View
 
seenloitering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There are only two rules of etiquette.

1) Try to accommodate as many other riders as you possibly can, in as many ways as you possibly can.
2) Expect no one to accommodate you.

Randonneuring is about generosity and independence. Give everything; expect nothing.
seenloitering is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 08:54 AM
  #14  
vik 
cyclopath
 
vik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Victoria, BC
Posts: 5,264

Bikes: Surly Krampus, Surly Straggler, Pivot Mach 6, Bike Friday Tikit, Bike Friday Tandem, Santa Cruz Nomad

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
Just curious what your thoughts are on the following situations…specifically relating to randonneuring brevets:
New rider shows up, first ride, slower than everyone else- you take off anyway? Ride with ‘em a while, then take off? Ride with ‘em the whole way?
There is no reason an experienced rider should feel obligated ride with the newbie. If one chooses to that's cool, but nobody should feel a responsibility. The new guy should be self-sufficient.

Personally I'd help someone in trouble for sure, but if they can't stay with the main group at the start there is nothing I can do and I won't ride at a super slow pace for 200K to keep them company the whole way. If the newbie is in trouble 30kms from the end I'd ride them in to the finish since they made it a long way in good time and the end of a brevet is probably the farthest they've ever ridden.

I'm going to be riding with 2 newbies on brevets this spring. I got them stoked on randoneering so I'll ride with them the whole way at whatever speed we can manage, but that's a different situation and my hope is to get the up to speed so I have some buddies to ride with.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]You catch up with another regular rider who is about your speed. They’re not unfriendly, but don’t seem to care whether you ride with them or not. Ride with them a ways and head on, ride with them a long time, just pass ‘em and be done with it or what?
Depends on the vibe I get. If in doubt I'll pass or drop back 50' to leave 'em alone. It's not a group ride so they don't need to feel like chatting or riding together.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]A regular rider seems to be having trouble and is going slower than normal. Head on, check with them and head on, stay with them?
I would check on them and try and help them depending on what the problem is. I would never prioritize finishing a ride over someone's safety, but if they are just feeling lousy, but not in danger I would get them to a safe spot to rest and bail and then go on myself. If they are injured or a danger to themselves I would ride with them until I can get the to safety/pick up, etc... If that means DNF on the brevet who cares?

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]Five or six of the regular guys just happen to be riding in a group. One stops to shed a layer. Others head on or wait up?
Depends on the guy and the group. If he can stay with the group for a long time I'd suggest we all take a quick break and do what we need to off the bike. OTOH if that rider was barely hanging on to the group and will get dropped at the next climb and we just had a break where he could have taken care of his layering than I'd just keep going.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]Another guy catches you and rides with you for 20 miles. At the next control, you get your stuff and are ready to ride, he’s not out yet. You ride on or wait for him?
Depends if I enjoyed the last 20miles or not. If we made a good team I'd arrange as we got to the control to met up in 5-15mins to ride together. If he never took a turn at the front and spend the last hour telling me annoying stories about his 10 cats I'd ditch him and get out of the control alone.

Bottom line I don't think there are any simple answers except when it comes to safety issues. If you abandon a rider who is at serious risk of injury or death to finish a bike ride you are a loser. Beyond that you need to evaluate each situation on its own merits.
__________________
safe riding - Vik
VikApproved

Last edited by vik; 01-27-11 at 09:00 AM.
vik is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 09:35 AM
  #15  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 19,905
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 431 Times in 328 Posts
The OP asks some interesting questions. I raced for many years, and there is definitely a different culture among racers than among randonneurs. In races, getting dropped is death; your ride is almost always over. So even on training rides, there is a big emphasis on the group. So when I started randonneuring, I took many of these expectations with me. But what I found was that a lot of times I couldn't even get other randonneurs to sit on my wheel. And I rather quickly got over any emotional issues with being dropped. I used to go with the fast group until they dropped me, but I haven't been doing that lately. And I found that I do like riding by myself. Sometimes it's nice just to be lazy. I would rather people not wait for me.
unterhausen is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 11:08 AM
  #16  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 16,399

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 101 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2403 Post(s)
Liked 478 Times in 352 Posts
These were my experiences, as I was taught to rando by more experienced riders. I think what my teachers did was reasonable and proper. I do like the independent style that's found in rando.
Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]New rider shows up, first ride, slower than everyone else- you take off anyway? Ride with ‘em a while, then take off? Ride with ‘em the whole way?
I probably never saw them, but if I did I'd ask them a few questions about their expectations, maybe offer a little advice, and then take off. I've a ride to do.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]You catch up with another regular rider who is about your speed. They’re not unfriendly, but don’t seem to care whether you ride with them or not. Ride with them a ways and head on, ride with them a long time, just pass ‘em and be done with it or what?
I caught up with them, i.e. I'm faster. I offer them a wheel and if they don't take it, I don't worry about it. Happens all the time. The other frequent thing is that another rider catches me. I ask if they mind me holding their wheel. Maybe that works, maybe it doesn't. Many times a faster rider will allow a wheel-sucker if they'll pull for a bit every 15 minutes or something. This is usually only a problem among the first few riders. They're not going to allow a wheelsucker to come in on their time, because maybe he'll come around them in the last couple of miles. They'll have at him until he cracks. Further back, it's usually pretty casual. Whatever.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]A regular rider seems to be having trouble and is going slower than normal. Head on, check with them and head on, stay with them?
Check with them and if it's nothing serious, head on. If it is serious, then they need a sag, so try to accomplish that.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]Five or six of the regular guys just happen to be riding in a group. One stops to shed a layer. Others head on or wait up?
We almost always drop them. Same for a pee stop or a flat. Once I convinced a group to wait for a slower climber who would give strong pull on the upcoming flats. Once. OTOH, if it's me that's stopping for a layer or pee, I just ride harder than they and get them back. That's the reason I'm riding with these guys. We could all do that. If it's a flat, too bad, you're gone. It's not a group training ride.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]Five or six of the regular guys just happen to be riding in a group, and are joined by the new guy. After 20 miles, the new guy stops to shed a layer. Others head on or wait up?
Same as above. Want to ride with us? Show a little courage.

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
[*]Another guy catches you and rides with you for 20 miles. At the next control, you get your stuff and are ready to ride, he’s not out yet. You ride on or wait for him?
Usually ride on. Groups are constantly forming and reforming. I don't worry about what's on his mind. Give the guy some privacy. Maybe I've destroyed his legs and he's trying to ditch me or maybe he just doesn't like me. OTOH, I've had riding buddies wait for me to come in to a control for 10-15 minutes. But then I'll give good pull. So it depends on who it is, the relationship, and the brevet length.

Last edited by Carbonfiberboy; 01-27-11 at 11:18 AM.
Carbonfiberboy is online now  
Old 01-27-11, 12:46 PM
  #17  
StephenH
Uber Goober
Thread Starter
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,738
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 22 Posts
Thanks for the input, everyone. Any additional thoughts are welcome, too.

I think in each case, I've seen it done both ways, so I was curious how it ought to be done. I've been in positions where I didn't know if it was rude to stick around or rude to ride away and have probably hit it the wrong way more than once, too. I tend to assume that other people think like me, so if I'd like some company, I assume others would too, but find that's not the case...but it's seldom communicated one way or the other, either.

When I first started randonneuring, my impression was that all these people rode together because they were friends, but then they were friends because they rode together, which kind of made it hard for a newcomer to know where to fit in.

I've seen situations where certain people worked to keep a group together and keep everyone moving, and it was pretty obvious that I was supposed to be in that group. I've run across other riders that just didn't seem friendly at all, and made it fairly obvious they didn't care for me to stick around. The question comes up with the ones in between those two extremes.

"Randonneuring is ...unsupported endurance cycling...Friendly camaraderie...is the hallmark of randonneuring." The "unsupported" tends to push one in the direction of solo riding, while the camaraderie implies a more social situation. The questions above are really trying to balance between these two aspects.
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 11:03 PM
  #18  
Haku
Senior Member
 
Haku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dubin, TX
Posts: 111

Bikes: 2011 Specialized Roubaix Comp Compact

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What I am getting over and over again is that Brevets are individual rides. So when I ride them for now own I will keep that in the formost of my mind, and ride my ride. Thanks Stephen that really helps in my understanding of the Brevet ride.
Haku is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 11:39 PM
  #19  
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 3,370

Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Haku View Post
What I am getting over and over again is that Brevets are individual rides...
I think you got that wrong. They aren't necessarily individual rides. The vast majority of riders ride in groups. They my be small groups (two riders) and they may be nebulous shifting in numbers and individuals throughout the ride but they are groups. There are very few people who do these rides completely solo. From my experience it's usually the very fast and the very slow who end up by themselves.

Yes you need to be self reliant and yes you need to be able to ride by yourself when you need to but in the grand scheme of things they are not really individual rides. I've been doing brevets for over 15 yrs and I can count the brevets I've done by myself on a couple fingers. I'm almost always riding with someone, especially on the longer 600km+ brevets.
Homeyba is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 11:44 PM
  #20  
Haku
Senior Member
 
Haku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dubin, TX
Posts: 111

Bikes: 2011 Specialized Roubaix Comp Compact

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I hear you and agree, but at the end of the day he bottom line to any ride is ride your ride otherwise you might not finish.
Haku is offline  
Old 01-28-11, 12:04 AM
  #21  
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,752
Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1439 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
I think you got that wrong. They aren't necessarily individual rides. The vast majority of riders ride in groups. They my be small groups (two riders) and they may be nebulous shifting in numbers and individuals throughout the ride but they are groups. There are very few people who do these rides completely solo. From my experience it's usually the very fast and the very slow who end up by themselves.

Yes you need to be self reliant and yes you need to be able to ride by yourself when you need to but in the grand scheme of things they are not really individual rides. I've been doing brevets for over 15 yrs and I can count the brevets I've done by myself on a couple fingers. I'm almost always riding with someone, especially on the longer 600km+ brevets.
It does depend very much in what region one rides as to the numbers that start.
Rowan is offline  
Old 01-28-11, 12:06 AM
  #22  
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 3,370

Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yep, you have to ride your own ride. On a ride like a 1200k you may end up riding with 5-6 different groups or with one the whole way. There are really two times that I can think of where trying to ride at another persons pace can cause you to risk not finishing. The first is if your riding with a really slow person and they are having problems making the controls on time. At that point you have to make a decision. Should you stay or should you go? The other is if you are trying to hang with a group that is much faster than you. You can cook yourself and make it difficult to finish. The positive side to going fast is that if you go fast you can "bank" some time which you can use to recover. Some people just quit when they blow up when if they just, stayed on their bike and slowed down they would have recovered after some time. That's just experience.

Last edited by Homeyba; 01-28-11 at 12:15 AM.
Homeyba is offline  
Old 01-28-11, 12:10 AM
  #23  
Homeyba
Senior Member
 
Homeyba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 3,370

Bikes: Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
It does depend very much in what region one rides as to the numbers that start.
I suppose. Even in the old days when there was just four of us out there we stayed together for the most part. There will always be the individuals who ride by themselves but for the most part people are social animals and will come together when they can.
Homeyba is offline  
Old 01-28-11, 03:34 AM
  #24  
chewybrian 
"Florida Man"
 
chewybrian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: East Florida
Posts: 1,665

Bikes: '16 Bob Jackson rando, '66 Raleigh Superbe, 80 Nishiki Maxima, 07 Gary Fisher Utopia, 09 Surly LHT

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1133 Post(s)
Liked 425 Times in 262 Posts
Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
Yep, you have to ride your own ride. On a ride like a 1200k you may end up riding with 5-6 different groups or with one the whole way. There are really two times that I can think of where trying to ride at another persons pace can cause you to risk not finishing. The first is if your riding with a really slow person and they are having problems making the controls on time. At that point you have to make a decision. Should you stay or should you go?...
I think it becomes a problem even if they are not bumping up against the control times. If you stick with a slower rider long enough, it can seriously cut in to your sleep time on longer rides. Until the final day, I would not ride along with anyone unless they are reasonably close to the pace I want to set.

Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
...Some people just quit when they blow up when if they just, stayed on their bike and slowed down they would have recovered after some time. That's just experience.
I could never understand why people quit with time in the bank! On my first brevet, I bonked hard after riding with a faster group (lesson learned). I did not think I would finish, but it did not make sense to me to bail. If I line up to start, my quit plan involves only: a mechanical breakdown, emergency room visit, or missing the control time. I pushed on at 8 and 9 mph for a while, and a couple hours later I was fine.

On the longer rides, I've had wild swings in my energy level or ability to stay awake. It is amazing how good you can feel an hour after feeling like you are about to fall off the bike. I'm a pretty stubborn person, and this is one place where it pays off.
__________________
Campione Del Mondo Immaginario
chewybrian is offline  
Old 01-28-11, 10:00 AM
  #25  
vik 
cyclopath
 
vik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Victoria, BC
Posts: 5,264

Bikes: Surly Krampus, Surly Straggler, Pivot Mach 6, Bike Friday Tikit, Bike Friday Tandem, Santa Cruz Nomad

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Haku View Post
What I am getting over and over again is that Brevets are individual rides. So when I ride them for now own I will keep that in the formost of my mind, and ride my ride. Thanks Stephen that really helps in my understanding of the Brevet ride.
The questions at the top were about strangers you interacted with on a brevet...if you show up at the start with 3 friends you may well ride together for fun as a group...stopping for people and organizing the departure from controls so you stay together.
__________________
safe riding - Vik
VikApproved
vik is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.