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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

600k

Old 06-04-11, 08:30 PM
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600k

What do you carry on the bike with you for a 600k and how do you carry it. Thanks for the help.
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Old 06-04-11, 10:11 PM
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Two tubs, 4 CO2 cartridges and pump, a patch kit, 1 tire iron, money/CC, ID in an underseat bag. A route sheet on the handlebars. Headlight on the frame mount, two read tail lights on the seat stays. What food and clothes I carry depends on the ride. If it's a ride out in the middle of nowhere or with bad weather I'll use a seatpoast mounted bag to carry extra food or clothes. Anything else I might need I stuff in my drop bag if applicable.
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Old 06-04-11, 10:56 PM
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Pretty much the same thing I carry on other randonneuring rides. I have a trunk bag, use a small handlebar bag for rando rides, and for hotter weather, have been carrying a camelback, which is also a handy place to put my reflective gear or rain jacket.

So, let's see:
Spare tube, maybe two
Sometimes a spare tire
Pump
Tire levers
Patch kit
Boot
Spare headlight
Spare batteries for taillights
Reflective vest
Reflective ankle bands
Helmet light (to read cue sheet)
Water in camelbak
Gatorade in one water bottle
Perpetuum in one water bottle
4" Vice grips
Tandem length shift cable
Park multitool
Small allen wrenches
Rubber bands
Spare cleat screws
Possibly spare cleat
Little roll of wire
Duct tape wrapped around pen
Safety pins
Endurolytes
Nuun tablets
Rolaids
Sunblock
Ibuprofen
Cue sheet in cue sheet holder
Brevet card
Baggie
Wallet
Car keys
Spare car key
Spare house key
Emergency Clif bar
Bungie cord
Possibly rain jacket
Possibly cooler-weather clothing
Chain tool, quick links, few links of chain
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Old 06-05-11, 12:41 AM
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A cell phone, for calling a cab at the 400k mark.

Okay, seriously, I'm kind of with Stephen on this one. I have a handlebar bag loaded with the same stuff whether it's a Sunday club run or a 600k. A spare tire (I ride 650b so don't plan on finding something at the LBS) a couple of tubes, a patch kit, a couple of tire levers (if I bring one I'll need two; if I bring three I won't need any...), one of those little Swiss-army style wrench kits, a reflective sash and ankle bands, warm gloves (and sometimes arm and leg warmers and a rain cape, if the night offers those kinds of conditions) and one Powerbar per hour I expect to be on the bike. (I'm lazy and uncreative when it comes to food on the bike. When I get sick of Powerbars I barge into the 7-11 looking for tuna sandwiches and Dr. Pepper.)

I use generator powered LED lights so don't carry batteries or spare bulbs (neener-neener) and honestly find drop bags so annoying that I don't bother with them.

Ultimately, I think you'll find that you just have to experiment. I don't think you'll find any two identical load-outs anywhere.
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Old 06-05-11, 01:09 AM
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I use the HBB only on 600s, things I carry are:

- 1 Jersey+Bibs+Gloves+Scoks for changing - It might seem completely off, but a change helps a lot believe me.
- Arm+Leg warmers - if the condition calls for it.. though I've found even in warm climate nights can get cold & these help a little
- Patch kit with Tyre Boot
- Spare Power links
- 2 spare spokes and spoke wrench...Though I have 36hole wheels. these weight almost nothing & can save a ride in a mishap
- Butt Cream - does a lot of good
- small Tooth paste - to brush in the morning or after the night halt it's a good refresher & keeps the mouth clean
- Sealed refreshing Tissues - This kept me awake last time
- Nutribars are good source of on bike food. I've been hearing about Hammer products & I'm certainly gonna give them a shot later. a few Snickers & a Crackle Chocolate, to keep a little variety.
- Salted Cashews, Peanuts
- Few Electrolytes
- Peanut butter Sandwiches

I sometimes carry a little pasta for the first leg to eat it as lunch in case of morning starts. And on my last 600 I've actually carried roasted chicken pieces like Hiret Fell(sheldon's wife) & it was great & I ate most of it while on the bike
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Old 06-06-11, 04:28 PM
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I just posted the packing list for a 600k on my blog a couple days ago. Turns out I didn't use anything from my drop bag.
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Old 06-06-11, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by lonesomesteve
...Turns out I didn't use anything from my drop bag.
That's what you want! It's nice to have it there if you need though.
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Old 06-06-11, 07:29 PM
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Here's my usual 600K routine. I go lighter than most:

I wear bib shorts, a short-sleeve jersey, socks, short-fingered gloves, a helmet, cycling shoes, and sunglasses (with interchangeable lenses, so I can put clear ones in at night). I wear the required reflective ankle bands all the time.

I carry the cue sheet (cut down and folded strategically and stored in a zip-lock bag) in my right jersey pocket. Some guys laminate the cue sheet, highlight turns in different colors, etc. Most carry the cue sheet in a handlebar holder but I've always preferred a jersey or jacket pocket. If you're riding at night, blowing up the cue sheet so the font is bigger and easier to read is a good idea. My camera is also in the same jersey pocket.

The middle jersey pocket has a freezer ziplock in which I put money ($20 per 200K works for me, but I live on the spendy side on these rides), a credit card (leave the AmEx at home; no one takes it in rural areas), drivers' license, cell phone, and the brevet card.

The left jersey pocket is for food. At each control, I put two "snacky things" in the pocket. Usually some peanut butter crackers, Nature Valley granola.... typical gas station fare. If it's going to be hot, I carry a ziplock with Endurolytes in it; I take about 3 an hour. I usually don't bother with them.

On all my 600Ks and 1200Ks, I've used a Caradice Super C seat-post bag. It's a heavy cordura(?)/nylon bag with basic functionality and easily carries everything I need on a long ride. In the bag I put my tire repair kit: two tire levers, two tubes, two CO2 cartridges, the CO2 valve, a bunch of boots (made from old innertubes), and a patch kit (I like the quick patches better than glue for on-the-road repairs). I also carry a good multi tool. A spoke wrench and knowledge of how to use it is critical. All of this goes into a ziplock freezer bag lest it gets soaked. I usually carry a spare tire, folded up (some flats cannot be booted). A pump is mandatory -- what if you run out of gas? I use a very small one that fits easily in the bag but readily borrow a frame pump for on-the-road repairs if another rider happens to have one.

The reflective vest or sash for when riding at night goes in the bag if I'm not wearing it. I usually carry no spare or extra clothing. On rides with more changeable or less ideal weather, any clothes not being worn would go into the bag -- usually just arm and knee warmers and a very light head covering. They take up little room, hardly weigh anything, and deliver the same warmth as a good jacket. If those won't cut it -- which is rare -- I add a light jacket. I've only had to carry the heavy jacket (which still just a windbreaker) once, on a 1200K where the temps fell to near freezing at night. If there is no drop bag, or the ride does not come back to the start/finish at the 400K point (many routes are designed this way), then I carry a change of shorts. Fresh shorts every 400K are a luxury I'm unwilling to live without (keeping your backside clean and dry keeps you form getting saddle sores). Put all clothing, except the jacket, in ziplock bags to keep it dry and clean. Again, if there's no drop bag/400K return, then I carry basic toiletries -- tooth brush, toothpaste, and stuff for my contact lenses. If there's room in the bag after all this is stuffed in, an extra snacky thing or two gets added for good measure. An extra copy of the cue sheet in your bag is a good idea, too. Don't forget the sunscreen. They're expensive, but buy the little bottles rather than carry a whole tube of the stuff along.

If you're on a 600K or 1200K that has a drop bag at the 400K point, then you load that bag with extras of the things that can get consumed on the ride -- a tire, tubes, food items, etc. I'll have a fresh change of cycling clothes in there, along with civilian clothes in case you want to actually go anywhere. If you use a battery-operated light, toss the charger in the drop bag.

Lights are key. I use a (no longer made) Niterider Moab, an HID headlight. It runs through the night on any setting but the brightest one.

I carry two bottles, in cages, on the bike. Some use Camelbaks and some carry extra bottles. Unless you're racing without a crew, or unless you're painfully slow, or unless you're crossing a desert, two bottles will suffice.

Other than the few snacks I carry, all food and all water gets bought on the route.

Notable by their absence are some of the things that I don't carry:
(1) Extra/kevlar spokes. Anything that fails the wheel sets I ride to the point that I cannot fix them with a spoke wrench is probably going to end my ride anyway. I only weigh 165# and ride premium wheels laced 3x by someone who knows what the heck he's doing. If all of this isn't true of you and your wheelset, bring extra spokes.

(2) Extra chain/chain links. No need on a fixed gear (anything that breaks an 1/8" chain running on a straight chain-line is probably putting me in the hospital). On a geared bike you can always shorten the chain, drive one of the pins back in, and manage your gear selection so you can ride it in. Not recommended, but it works.

(3) Bag Balm or equivalent. I've never needed it. On really hot, humid rides I'll carry one or two of those one-use samples that you pick up in goodie bags from organized centuries. A small tube of triple antibiotic works well, too, and actually has healing properties.

(4) Extra cables. More necessary on a geared bike than a fixed gear (I run two brakes; it's very foolish not to on a long ride), but the work-around is still easy. You can live without the front derailleur easily. The worst case scenario is you turn the bike into a single speed and can ride it in. Start every season by replacing all your cables and then you likely don't ever have to worry about cable failure.

(5) Rain gear. You're likely going to get soaked anyway and you and your bike will still be covered in grime and grit. I don't bother staying dry; instead, I focus on staying warm. I take a pass on fenders and rain suits. Other randonneurs wouldn't be caught dead without them. Let comfort guide you, but remember that no one ever DNF'd due to being wet, but plenty of people DNF due to being hypothermic.

(6) A cycle computer or GPS. I ran GPS for a few years and gave up on it. Too many batteries. Too heavy. Had me focused too much on the data and the map and not on the ride and the scenery and just being out there enjoying it all. If you use auto-routing, then it's too easy to let the computer get you off route and lost. I quit the computer three years ago when it died in the middle of a ride and I found that I liked riding better without it. I was totally focused on the route and where I was going and the scenery instead of staring at my handlebars or worrying about why the turn was 0.10 miles late or early and whether it was the correct one. Pulling off a ride without a computer requires some faith in the cue sheet (they're not always correct). I eliminate most potential errors by checking the sheet beforehand on my GPS software to see if the mileages and the identity of the roads match. This double-check works well. I've spent less than 10 miles off route in several thousand miles of brevets since I quit the computer. All that said, I would advise others against this approach -- I've done 65+ brevets and I ride fast enough to make up time on even a serious navigational error. Until riding 400 miles in a weekend seems like it's no big deal to you, use a well-calibrated computer with fresh batteries. (But leave the GPS home.)

(7) Extra cogs/chain whip/flip-flop. Many fixed distance riders run a flip-flop, and some run a freewheel on the flip side. It's nice to have a bailout. I like the challenge and adventure of picking the right gear. Turns out 72" works well for me for just about everything (I've used 76-80" in long-distance races and I've used 76" on two short, flat brevets). I like the idea of riding the same gear with no other options for the whole ride.
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Old 06-06-11, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by The Octopus
(5) Rain gear. You're likely going to get soaked anyway and you and your bike will still be covered in grime and grit. I don't bother staying dry; instead, I focus on staying warm. I take a pass on fenders and rain suits. Other randonneurs wouldn't be caught dead without them. Let comfort guide you, but remember that no one ever DNF'd due to being wet, but plenty of people DNF due to being hypothermic.
Fightin' words!

You must be tougher than me, but I just couldn't tolerate 10 or 15 hours with a wet arse. For me, rain gear and fenders are a necessity.
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Old 06-06-11, 07:40 PM
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you can say wet ass, you just can't say *******

I just put fenders on my bike. I didn't notice the weight. I've happily ridden many hours in the wet, but I do like fenders. I was motivated more by the idea of 24 hours in the saddle in the rain. Didn't like that idea.
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Old 06-06-11, 08:54 PM
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Didn't want people think I had a moist donkey fetish or something.
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