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120 miles a day for roughly 40 days, doable?

Old 12-02-11, 03:19 AM
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Locko28
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120 miles a day for roughly 40 days, doable?

Hi there, a friend recently proposed a challenge of cycling roughly 120 miles a day for about 40 days straight at beginning early June, there is no particular speed that we have to go at however as long as we complete the mileage. One catch though, I am a complete novice at cycling! I have a very good level of fitness already as I do alot of all types of running both interval and endurance. I know this is doable however could anybody give me some guidance as to if this is enough time to train for it?

Any feed back would be gratefully received!

Regards
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Old 12-02-11, 03:51 AM
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What's the longest distance you've cycled so far recently? If it's zero ... the go out and do some cycling this weekend and report back here as to how it went.

You might have enough time to train for it, but it's kind of hard to tell when we don't know what distance you're comfortable with now.
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Old 12-02-11, 04:22 AM
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Cheers for the quick response! Its very much in its early stages as I dont have a bike yet however have just been into a cycle shop and they say it would be a touring or cyclo cross bike I would be looking at, any suggestions?
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Old 12-02-11, 04:27 AM
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Is this a tour or particular event? Or is it just a friendly challenge to ride 120 miles a day around the same area? This is absolutely doable but certainly a big challenge, especially if you really can't take rest days. 40 days is a long haul. For the total novice, I would say this isn't a great idea. I definitely echo the advice to go out and ride and see how you feel. If you are worn out at 40 miles, well, things will be difficult indeed.
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Old 12-02-11, 08:26 AM
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Certainly doable.

It looks very different, though, especially depending on whether you're touring and carrying provisions with you (in which case, it's a monster effort), what terrain you're riding through, whether you have any other obligations during this time period, etc.

Pretty much anywhere in the world, you're going to get some lousy weather over any 40-day time period. Riding 120 miles into a 40mph wind, or when its 100F outside (and conceivably both!) looks very different than riding 120 miles a day 40 days in a row when it's 68F, overcast, with no wind and no precipitation.

If you're starting off now in good shape and you gradually get some cycling under your belt over then next few months, if you tackle what could be some significant logistics problems, and if you properly prepare your mind and manage your expectations (there will be times when this is no fun and there will be times when you have to ride when you'd rather do anything else), then there's no reason you can't pull something like this off. It would be an experience of a lifetime.
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Old 12-02-11, 08:51 AM
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No.
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Old 12-02-11, 09:51 AM
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Sure it's possible if you're already in good shape but I echo what's been said: you're going to hit bad weather days and if the goal is really 40 consecutive days that ups the ante considerably.

Also, there's a fair amount of "cumulative effect" - it really does get harder as the miles and days pile up with no rest. The most consecutive 100+ days I've ridden (and I've been riding a long time) is 11 and although I could have ridden more I was glad I didn't have to

I will say that when I first started riding, from a "standing start" - no prior serious riding at all - in September I rode 8 consecutive 100+ mile days the following March. It's the only time in my life I've ever had what you'd call a training program. I had fixed goals for each week that included consecutive days and weeks of increased mileage e.g., in one week I'd ride 30-50-30 during the week, the next week I'd ride 40-65-40, the next 60-85-60, ...

I think you'd be wise to have a plan with specific goals of how you're going to work up to riding consecutive 100+ mile days. You might be in good shape but exercise is very sports specific (I could go out the door and ride 100 miles today, an hour of full court basketball and I'd be laid up for a week) and ramping up to that kind of mileage without injury is going to be a challenge.

Good luck and report back on how you're doing!

Last edited by ghsmith54; 12-02-11 at 09:52 AM. Reason: clarification
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Old 12-02-11, 10:15 AM
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Off hand I'd say -no. No matter your current status, its not likely you can successfully maintain this type of physical demand for 40 days straight. If you mean to just ride any mix of mileage to accumulate 4800 miles across a 40 day period - that would make it slightly easier.

But just out of curiosity - I'd like to see you log 500 miles in 5 days - then your shovel-filled post won't smell nearly as bad.
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Old 12-02-11, 10:48 AM
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If each of the 120 miles/day also involve some good hills then it's going to be extremely difficult.
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Old 12-02-11, 10:56 AM
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Hmm, I set and completed a similar, though shorter distance, challenge for myself this past May. 30 consecutive rides of 60 miles - half the distance you are shooting for. My experience was that the challenge was mostly physical for the first 5 days as I was out of riding shape to start with. I was also reacting to pollen in the air, riding in high humidity conditions and recovering from bronchitis. The next 20 days or so were simply routine riding - get out the door and do it. The last five days were the most difficult. I could "see the end" of the challenge, my knees had begun to wear/tire a bit and it was no longer "fun" like it had been when I started out. It was enjoyable, but no longer "fun" if you get my drift. I was lucky in that the weather cooperated for the most part - except for the Southeastern Louisiana increasingly high heat & humidity that is normal for May.

I think that your time and distance is defnitely doable IF you take your time each day. Averaging 10mph for 12 hours completes the challenge with minimal "major pain" BUT it seems like it takes all day (because it does). Choosing your route or routes carefully will have a big effect on your attitude and probability of completion. Some people get bored riding the same route over and over; others don't. Riding a 120 mile route with lots of steep or even rolling hills is quite different than riding a flat 120 mile route. Speed is also a consideration. Are you going to try to "set a land sped record" each day or merely complete the distance - or vary your plan each day? To be honest, wind was such a variable for me that I decided to just complete my routes at a comfortable but not dawdling pace most days. I never tried to ride at "impressive" speeds.

One other thing - repetitive motion/stress injury can rear it's nasty head if you aren't prepared to deal with it. Without hot showers, putting my legs "up" for an hour or two each day after the rides, and without a few friendly leg massages, it would have been more difficult for me to finish my self-challenge than it was.

Then again, more than a few people complete cross-continent tours averaging 80-100 miles/day over 30-60 days each year. so my own little challenge pales in comparison.

Good luck.

Added: Afterwards, in thinking about the effect on my mind & body, even taking a single day off, a rest day, in the middle of the challenge would have done wonders for me. YMMV.
The best advice I can give is:
1) Get a good bike fit! and find a seat that you can sit on for hours without regretting it.
2) Carry more water than you think you need - unless there are convenience stores every 5-10 miles.
3) Learn what food you can tolerate while riding.
4) Start riding now - work your distances up each week. (Do a search for "training for 100 mile/century rides.)
5) Riding a diamond frame bike is different than riding a recumbent. This challenge might be easier on a recumbent than on a diamond frame.
6) Learn to pace yourself. Take a break before you need it. Drink before you need it. Snack constantly while riding. Use sunscreen lliberally. Wear sunglasses and a hat/helmet with a brim. Find comfortable and easy to maintain riding clothes - whatever works for you, not just what someone else recommends (duplicate sets of clothes means you don't have to wash every night).
7) Put together a basic on-bike emergency kit - tools, first aid, pump, phone/cash/identity card, etc. Learn to do basic, side of the road, emergency repairs - fix rear wheel flat comes to mind. Carry it on the bike all the time/every ride. Though you are riding with a partner, you each need to carry a certain amount of your own personal emergency spares - but can share/split other items between you. BTW, 2 spare tubes and a repair kit made each daily ride "faster" than just carrying a repair kit; I fixed my flats at night after completing the day's ride.
8) Do a pre-ride bike check daily. Lube your chain every 2-3 days at the distances you are riding, possibly more depending on the road conditions.
9) Learn the signs, symptoms and treatment of heat stress, heat exhaustion and dehydration. This is both for yourself and your riding partner - watch out for each other and be "physically self-aware". Consider a basic first aid course and CPR certification --- never know if/when any of these might come in handy.
10) If there's a chance you will ride in low-light, rainy or dark conditions, get a "proven" light system - battery or dynamo-powered doesn't matter. Find something that works. Carry a spare bulb and a couple spare batteries (if you don't have a dynamo hub). At least once, go out in a low light/dark condition and remove&re-mount your rear wheel, tire and tube as if you were repairing a flat. That practice is worth its weight in gold under some circumstances on the road.

11) Remember, there's no "shame" in not actually completing your self-challenge. It's YOUR challenge, after all. You have nothing to prove. There's no reason to hurt yourself though riding through discomfort or low emotional points is something that will surely be necessary at some point. Just keep on pedalling. Take a break - eat and drink something - then ride on. You said you aren't racing the clock.

Last edited by drmweaver2; 12-02-11 at 11:29 AM.
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Old 12-02-11, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by hyhuu View Post
If each of the 120 miles/day also involve some good hills then it's going to be extremely difficult.
If each day is FLAT, then it is going to be even more difficult.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mostly I agree with the sentiment behind Cranium's comment. But I'll clean it up a bit:

How about you get a bike and start riding ... say 20 miles a day for 4 times a week.
Then up it to 35 miles 4 days a week.
Then ...

Let us know when you've discovered the reason for chamois cream (or its alternatives).

Riding regular 60 milers will teach you some things.

But complications arise, not on a linear projection, probably more like an exponential function.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Above noted, however, also note that PacTour frequently averages 113 miles a day for about 30 days, to cross the continent.

So ... 120 miles a day is do-able.
But only if you've trained your body and brain for it.

Is from now until June enough time to train for it?

You decide.

Last edited by skiffrun; 12-02-11 at 11:16 AM.
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Old 12-02-11, 12:59 PM
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maybe if you put an easy day in there every 5th day or so
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Old 12-02-11, 01:28 PM
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I hope the OP gets to do it so we can read his report. I'm sure it's going to be awesome.

FWIW, my commute is 60 miles round trip East-West direction. On those days when I'm fighting the constant headwind for 30 miles on the way back, I'm tired the next day. The same thing happens when my weekend ride involves climbs several miles long (heck even pros need rest for major climbs). I can't imagine doing what you plan to do days in and days out. But I have no talent and am getting old. Good luck.
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Old 12-02-11, 02:11 PM
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nope, have a job
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Old 12-02-11, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Gonzo Bob View Post
maybe if you put an easy day in there every 5th day or so
+1. I'd try to get in some 180-200 mile days so I could get in a couple of 10-20 mile days.
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Old 12-02-11, 02:37 PM
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A number of years ago I averaged aproximately 115/day for 30 days for a most miles in a month contest (I didn't win). The riding wasn't horrible but the whole thing is a lot more difficult than you are imagining. I was leaving work at 4:30 and riding a century after work then riding home. It made for long days and we were doing sub 6hr centuries every day and double centuries + on the weekends. If you are riding slow you're going to have some very long days and it's not going to be too much fun. It's kind of fun to say we did it but it really wasn't a whole lot of fun. In retrospect, too much time spent doing just one thing goes from fun to sucky pretty quick. Unless you are extremely determined your chances of being succesful in this endevor are not the best.
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Old 12-02-11, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by drmweaver2 View Post
8) Do a pre-ride bike check daily. Lube your chain every 2-3 days at the distances you are riding, possibly more depending on the road conditions.
9) Learn the signs, symptoms and treatment of heat stress, heat exhaustion and dehydration. This is both for yourself and your riding partner - watch out for each other and be "physically self-aware". Consider a basic first aid course and CPR certification --- never know if/when any of these might come in handy.
I'd suggest doing the bike check when you get off the bike every night. That'll give you a bit of time to fix things before the next day.

And do worry about heat exhaustion. Drink lots, and eat plenty of salt.
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Old 12-02-11, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Locko28 View Post
Cheers for the quick response! Its very much in its early stages as I dont have a bike yet however have just been into a cycle shop and they say it would be a touring or cyclo cross bike I would be looking at, any suggestions?
The longer you delay getting the bicycle ... and the longer you delay getting out there and riding ... the less doable this adventure becomes.

The beginning of June is only 6 months away. You don't have much time to build up to that kind of distance, and especially to build up to that kind of distance several days in a row.

Several others have asked so I will too ...

1) Is this an organised event?

2) Are the 120 mile routes your choice, or will they be decided for you by the ride organiser?

3) What will the terrain be like ... hilly? Flat? A mix of the two?

4) Will you be riding the same route every day or a different route each day?

5) Are you starting and finishing each ride at home ... or is this a tour where you'll end each night in a different location?

6) If it is a tour, will you be carrying a lot of stuff on your bicycle? Or will you have a support vehicle?

7) Do you currently have a physical job where you go to work 5+ days each week and work hard physically ... lifting, walking, moving, etc. ... or is your current job quite sedentary? If you have a physical job where you're "working out" 8 hours a day 5 days a week, and if you don't feel overly tired by the weekend, you might have a shot at doing this challenge because that's something like what it will be like ... only you won't get weekends off, and you might be required to put in overtime ... maybe 10 hours a day.
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Old 12-02-11, 06:25 PM
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At 20 even though I had never ridden as an adult such a goal would ahve been reasonable. But I was a competitive swimmer and was used to 2 hour workouts every day and 3 hours on Saturday. And often after the saturday workout we would go the the beach to get in some body surfing.

At 40 I did back to back doubles without a single 100 mile ride for the 3 months before, but back to back rides most weekends. This would likely have been doable then.

Depending on verticle feet climbed, enough hills could have done me in, esp if unsupported.

What plans do you have for sleeping? camping or hotel/motel? If not used to camping that part can do you in.

Who is planning the routes? If unsupported if the route is not planned by someone who is good at it a surprise or 2 can do you in.

I'd strongly suggest at least a 3 day trip with 140 plus miles each day, learn what yuo are getting into before you are far from home.

Personally I'd advise against such a schedule, it may be doable, but for the inexperienced it is not apt to be fun. Better a less ambitious goal that is more apt to be fun.
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Old 12-02-11, 06:26 PM
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I think the OP has left the building

Seriously though, this is one of those things that sounds like "fun" when you're sitting around over a few beers. The reality is quite different as a number of responders have noted.

As I said earlier in this thread, it's certainly possible, but the reality is the OP doesn't even own a bike yet and to get in shape for, much less pull off, that kind of mileage takes a serious commitment. I've ridden more than 100k miles and am in reasonable good shape and I think I could do it but I'm fairly sure I don't want to. For a noob who doesn't even own a bike to take this on I'd put his chances as iffy, at best.

More power to him though!
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Old 12-02-11, 06:54 PM
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My thought is that it's doable, but it's highly unlikely that you actually would WANT to do it. But what you need to do is start riding now, work your way up to some 120-mile days, and see what it's like. I think if you'll ride back-to-back 120-mile days, you won't need to be asking anyone else. You'll be thinking "Whee, that's fun, let's go another 38 days!" or "That's okay, but enough is enough" or "That sucks, what was I thinking?"

Riding in the heat in the summer is a challenge. One of my online friends had big plans to ride Route 66 a summer or two back, and he nearly had heatstroke the first day out, thus ended that ride. If you're touring across country, you can have days when you're riding into a headwind all day long. If you're carrying camping stuff, that slows you down. If you're depending on riding with a friend, then if either one of you backs out, that'll likely kill it for the other. If you're riding in the heat, you sort of need to know where water is ahead of time, so it could be awkward to just take off across country. And, if it was me, I would mix up some longer and shorter days so I had at least one "rest day" a week.
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Old 12-02-11, 07:06 PM
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I think it's way too much time to place the body in any one position. The aches and pains from the limited range of motion and saddle sores will be unbearable.
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Old 12-02-11, 09:45 PM
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Actually, as was pointed out a while back on these very forums, there exist records of "most miles bicycled in a year" where quite a few more days than 40, actually 320-365 depending on the person, involved riding an average of over 150 miles per day during one calendar year. So, it's definitely possible.
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Old 12-03-11, 02:14 AM
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Originally Posted by ghsmith54 View Post
I think the OP has left the building
I'm guessing that the OP is from somewhere in Europe ... he probably won't be back on until later this evening.
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Old 12-03-11, 02:15 AM
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Originally Posted by jmio View Post
nope, have a job
What in the world does that have to do with the OP doing 120 miles a day over 40 days?
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