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List of Road Sport (RS) and 'endurance' frames designed for long distance cycling

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Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

List of Road Sport (RS) and 'endurance' frames designed for long distance cycling

Old 02-26-13, 02:43 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by Hydrated View Post
True dat, sir... true dat.

But I have to admit that I tend to load the handlebar bag with only stuff that is light or that I'll need to get to on the fly like food or arm warmers or a light jacket. So it is pretty lightly loaded. Heavier stuff goes in a Carradice saddlebag.
My problem is probably that I like to bring too much food. By the time I've packed up my 'little' handlebar bag with sandwiches and cookies and apples and chocoloate-chip banana bread (yes, really), I've really gone outside the intended purpose!

But, I like my lunches...since I refuse to change, I guess my bike has to!
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Old 02-26-13, 02:59 PM
  #52  
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Next time, I need to keep better track of what I put in my handlebar bag, and then weigh it with a representative load. I'm guessing it's between 5-10 lbs since I keep all my tools under the saddle, and all of my liquids on the frame.
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Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
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Old 02-26-13, 06:36 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Commodus View Post
My problem is probably that I like to bring too much food. By the time I've packed up my 'little' handlebar bag with sandwiches and cookies and apples and chocoloate-chip banana bread (yes, really), I've really gone outside the intended purpose!
That sounds like an admirable use for a handlebar bag!

I cannot ride very far without a bag because I'm an insulin dependent diabetic. So I have to eat a slow steady stream of food to keep my blood glucose inside a safe range. That food is what I have to carry up front... that and medical crap for emergencies and monitoring have to be within instant reach.

BTW... what will it cost me to get that chocolate chip banana bread recipe?
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Old 02-26-13, 06:43 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Commodus View Post
My problem is probably that I like to bring too much food. By the time I've packed up my 'little' handlebar bag with sandwiches and cookies and apples and chocoloate-chip banana bread (yes, really), I've really gone outside the intended purpose!
I'm hungry.
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Old 02-26-13, 07:58 PM
  #55  
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Even as a newb, I can understand the argument that everybody has a different idea of what makes a good LD bike, but I like the list anyway. I`m eventually going to retire my current bike from unloaded riding, and the bikes on this list all look like reasonable starting points since I`m not sure exactly what WILL work well for me. Nice to keep in the back of my mind while window shopping Craigslist.

A few more that might fit in here, depending on how strict your criteria are:
Pacer, Kona Hony-Tonk, Jamis Xenith Endura series
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Old 02-27-13, 01:19 AM
  #56  
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Rodriguez Rainier and Rodriguez Phinney Ridge (same as the Rainier model but w/ disc brakes.) For a little more, they will also build these bikes for 650b or even 26" wheels.
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Old 02-27-13, 04:20 AM
  #57  
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List of Road Sport (RS), classic and endurance geometry frames- please feel free to add to the list.

Jamis Zenith Endura
Kona HonkeyTonk
Rodriguez Rainier and Phinney Ridge(disc version)
Surly Pacer
Calfee 'Adventure' geometry frames
Novara Verita
Boulder Bikes Randonneur (low trail 650B)
Box Dog Bikes Pelican (low trail)
Cannondale Synapse
Specialized Roubaix
Kinesis RaceLight Grand Fondo
Raleigh Renevio and Capri
Soma (Smoothie) ES
Gunnar Sport
Trek Domane
Pinarello ROKH
Specialized Secteur
Raleigh Clubman
Scott CR1 Pro (2013)
BMC GF01
Fuji Grand Fondo
Giant Defy
Salsa colossal (disc bike)
Volagi (entire bike line geared to endurance riding)
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Old 02-27-13, 08:59 AM
  #58  
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Well if you're trying to make a comprehensive list ...

New randonneurs: Ride your first few 200's and maybe even your first SR series on the bike you've been riding so far. Until you've done a year of randonneuring, you just won't have talked with enough people or have enough experience to know what is most likely to work for you as an "upgrade".

For people who are curious about whether "low-trail" is right for them, an inexpensive approach is to buy a late-70's or early-80's Trek frame, many of which are low-trail-enough to get a good idea whether you like low trail. I have two rando-worthy Treks at the moment, an '82 728 and an '84 610. The 728 is currently running Grand Bois Hetre 650Bx42 tires and the 610 is running 700Cx32's. I had the Hetre's on the 610 but when I got the 728 I made that into my primary rando bike and the 610 went back to being my primary commuter bike. Here is my list of low-Trail, high-quality late 70's to early 80's Treks, taken primarily the catalogues at the vintage Trek website:

Low-Trail, high-quality late 70's to early 80's Treks:

AVOID '81 Trek 610/613/614 and '82 Trek 613/614 because the Ishiwata CCL fork crown does not have a proper lug point so it is a failure vector.

R531=Reynolds 531=R531
NCO=Reynolds New Continental Oval fork

Except as noted, all have 73 degree head angle, 55mm rake = 43mm trail with 650Bx42 tires.

1976 TX700=R531+NCO
1977 TX700=R531+NCO
1978 710=R531+NCO, 910=Columbus SL/SP+NCO
1979 710=R531+NCO, 910=Columbus SL/SP+NCO
1980 710=R531+NCO, 910=Columbus SL/SP
1981 AVOID 610/613/614, see above
1982 AVOID 613/614, see above
1983 600/620/630/640 = R531C + mangalloy fork -- rear-rack + water-bottle cage

1984 610=R531CS frame+fork; has 52mm rake=49.6mm trail with 650Bx42 tires.

1982 720/728=R531, 72 degree head+52 mm rake==> 52mm trail with 650Bx42 tires.

Note also: If you plan to upgrade to a "modern" drive train then you need to avoid frames that have the rear-derailleur cable running down the top of the chainstay. When you shift into the smallest sprocket, the chain will rub on the derailleur cable.

Nick
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Old 02-27-13, 10:05 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by Hydrated View Post
That sounds like an admirable use for a handlebar bag!

I cannot ride very far without a bag because I'm an insulin dependent diabetic. So I have to eat a slow steady stream of food to keep my blood glucose inside a safe range. That food is what I have to carry up front... that and medical crap for emergencies and monitoring have to be within instant reach.

BTW... what will it cost me to get that chocolate chip banana bread recipe?
Ingredients:

1 cup shortening

2 cups white sugar

2 eggs

2 tablespoons mayonnaise

6 very ripe bananas, mashed

3 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking powder

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Directions:

1) Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease two 9x5 inch loaf pans.
2) In a large bowl, cream together the shortening and sugar until light and fluffy. Stir in the eggs one at a time, beating well with each addition. Stir in the mayonnaise and bananas. Stir together the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda. Blend the flour mixture into the banana mixture; stir just enough to evenly combine. Fold in the chocolate chips and walnuts.
3) Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean, about 50 to 75 minutes. Cool loaf in the pan for 20 minutes before removing to a wire rack to cool completely.

***

I can take no credit for the recipe, I just got it from some website years ago. I've made many variations, one of which my sweetie's parents enjoyed so thoroughly that they hid it for the duration of the holiday dinner for which I brought it!
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Old 02-27-13, 10:42 AM
  #60  
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A volunteer at a recent brevet made croissant sandwiches with cream cheese, turkey bacon and strawberry jelly. It tasted wonderful.
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Old 02-27-13, 11:31 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by thebulls View Post
Well if you're trying to make a comprehensive list ...

New randonneurs: Ride your first few 200's and maybe even your first SR series on the bike you've been riding so far. Until you've done a year of randonneuring, you just won't have talked with enough people or have enough experience to know what is most likely to work for you as an "upgrade".

For people who are curious about whether "low-trail" is right for them, an inexpensive approach is to buy a late-70's or early-80's Trek frame, many of which are low-trail-enough to get a good idea whether you like low trail...............

Here is my list of low-Trail, high-quality late 70's to early 80's Treks, taken primarily the catalogues at the vintage Trek website:

....................

Nick
I was gearing it more towards new, production framesets instead of looking back, but

nice list and good advice. What's quite cool about 2013 and looking forward are that low trail and classic geometry bikes are becoming widely available again in the mainstream bike industry.

New steel frames are quite affordable to hang some parts on and perpetuate that intractable bicycle stable shuffle.

Last edited by Bekologist; 02-28-13 at 05:29 AM.
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Old 02-27-13, 12:03 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by thebulls View Post
Well if you're trying to make a comprehensive list ...

New randonneurs: Ride your first few 200's and maybe even your first SR series on the bike you've been riding so far. Until you've done a year of randonneuring, you just won't have talked with enough people or have enough experience to know what is most likely to work for you as an "upgrade".

For people who are curious about whether "low-trail" is right for them, an inexpensive approach is to buy a late-70's or early-80's Trek frame, many of which are low-trail-enough to get a good idea whether you like low trail. I have two rando-worthy Treks at the moment, an '82 728 and an '84 610. The 728 is currently running Grand Bois Hetre 650Bx42 tires and the 610 is running 700Cx32's. I had the Hetre's on the 610 but when I got the 728 I made that into my primary rando bike and the 610 went back to being my primary commuter bike. Here is my list of low-Trail, high-quality late 70's to early 80's Treks, taken primarily the catalogues at the vintage Trek website:

Low-Trail, high-quality late 70's to early 80's Treks:

AVOID '81 Trek 610/613/614 and '82 Trek 613/614 because the Ishiwata CCL fork crown does not have a proper lug point so it is a failure vector.

R531=Reynolds 531=R531
NCO=Reynolds New Continental Oval fork

Except as noted, all have 73 degree head angle, 55mm rake = 43mm trail with 650Bx42 tires.

1976 TX700=R531+NCO
1977 TX700=R531+NCO
1978 710=R531+NCO, 910=Columbus SL/SP+NCO
1979 710=R531+NCO, 910=Columbus SL/SP+NCO
1980 710=R531+NCO, 910=Columbus SL/SP
1981 AVOID 610/613/614, see above
1982 AVOID 613/614, see above
1983 600/620/630/640 = R531C + mangalloy fork -- rear-rack + water-bottle cage

1984 610=R531CS frame+fork; has 52mm rake=49.6mm trail with 650Bx42 tires.

1982 720/728=R531, 72 degree head+52 mm rake==> 52mm trail with 650Bx42 tires.

Note also: If you plan to upgrade to a "modern" drive train then you need to avoid frames that have the rear-derailleur cable running down the top of the chainstay. When you shift into the smallest sprocket, the chain will rub on the derailleur cable.

Nick
That's a great post. I kind of lucked into the low-trail thing last year. The '88 Bianchi Premio I bought the previous winter (only because I wanted a road bike with a larger frame ) happened to have 73 degree angles and a fork with about 62mm of rake! With the 700x28 tires, that gave a trail figure of about 40mm. The steering is so light that it's a joy to ride mile after mile.
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Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
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Old 02-27-13, 12:59 PM
  #63  
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Hi folks, newbie to this board and a relative newbie to road cycling. Just yesterday I picked up my new Trek Domane 4.5. I did not purchase it because it would be easier to endure 200 km rides, etc. Rather, the comfort it provided on less than smooth surfaces translated into a much more endurable (if that's a word) ride overall, no matter what the distance.

Its ability to absorb shock compared to a more typical racing style bike was remarkable on my test ride. So while I know manufacturers call the Domane an "endurance" bike I really bought it as a, heaven forbid I use the term, "comfort" bike that was still more than adept on long rides.
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Old 03-01-13, 05:23 AM
  #64  
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Nice report on the ride of the Domane, thanks.

another bike on the list, soon to be available from Soma.

List of Road Sport (RS), classic and endurance geometry frames- please feel free to add to the list.

Soma Grand Randonneur (low trail 650b)
Calfee 'Adventure' geometry frames
Novara Verita
Boulder Bikes Randonneur (low trail 650B)
Box Dog Bikes Pelican (low trail)
Cannondale Synapse
Specialized Roubaix
Kinesis RaceLight Grand Fondo
Raleigh Renevio and Capri
Soma (Smoothie) ES
Gunnar Sport
Trek Domane
Pinarello ROKH
Specialized Secteur
Raleigh Clubman
Scott CR1 Pro (2013)
BMC GF01
Fuji Grand Fondo
Giant Defy
Salsa colossal (disc bike)
Volagi (entire bike line geared to endurance riding)
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Old 03-01-13, 12:47 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by GP View Post
A volunteer at a recent brevet made croissant sandwiches with cream cheese, turkey bacon and strawberry jelly. It tasted wonderful.
But let's be honest, if you ride far enough, a LOT of things taste wonderful, assuming you haven't been eating them the whole while.
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Old 03-01-13, 01:53 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
But let's be honest, if you ride far enough, a LOT of things taste wonderful, assuming you haven't been eating them the whole while.
Rando is the best seasoning of all.
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Old 08-11-16, 09:55 PM
  #67  
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Steel Frame Road Sport Bikes

Steel Frame Road Sport Bikes

Lemond Poprad (oldie but goodie - eBay)
Gunnar Sport
Milwaukee Bicycle Company Road
Boulder Bicycle Road Sport
Rivendell Roadeo
Rodriguez Rainer
Co-Motion Nor'Wester
Soma ES
Black Mountain Cycles Road

Similar geometries for fast but comfortable 2 - 5 hour rides.
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Old 09-12-16, 05:19 AM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by cwakamo View Post
Steel Frame Road Sport Bikes

Lemond Poprad (oldie but goodie - eBay)
Gunnar Sport
Milwaukee Bicycle Company Road
Boulder Bicycle Road Sport
Rivendell Roadeo
Rodriguez Rainer
Co-Motion Nor'Wester
Soma ES
Black Mountain Cycles Road

Similar geometries for fast but comfortable 2 - 5 hour rides.
Woudn't we also want to include:

Boulder Bicycle Randonneur
Boulder Bicycle All-Road
Boxdog Pelican
Ocean Aire Rambler
Soma Grand Randonneuse
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