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Cycling Shoes

Old 05-16-13, 10:20 AM
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WeTommyD
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Cycling Shoes

I'm in need of a new shoe. Currently, wearing Sidi 5.5 which are too narrow and causes hot spots on the top right of my foot where I have small tailor bunions after 40 to 50 miles. I plan on going to a wide, however none of the local bike shops carry wide shoes but they can be ordered. They don't want to order more than one because they don't want to keep them in their inventory which is understandable. I would like to try on a selection of correct sizes before dropping the cash.

The two shoes I like most are as follows:

Specialized S Works Road. The fabric on top seem very thin and conforms to the foot. The BOA lacing system was really comfortable but seemed not as durable as a strap.

The Shimano Pro Tour Racing Custom Fit. These did not fit as well but will be adjusted through the fit process.

I've been suffering with Planter Fasciitis which was caused more by standing at work. Just last week I received prescription orthotics. Not sure if they would be better than no othotics in cycling shoe? The Dr. tends to think that I would not need them in cycling shoe.

So I'm looking for any good advice on shoes in particular in the wide versions that may be comfortable in the 100 to 150 mile range.
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Old 05-16-13, 11:25 AM
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unterhausen
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I use my prescription orthotics in my cycling shoes

Shoes are weird, it's not always obvious why they are causing hot spots
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Old 05-16-13, 12:25 PM
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My lady can't ride worth a damn without cycling-specific orthotics. Walking orthotics generally aren't much use in a cycling shoe.
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Old 05-16-13, 01:46 PM
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unterhausen
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my prescription orthotics are made by Sole. However, the main feature is a metatarsal pad. I have tried to figure out if Sole sells a cycling specific insole with a metatarsal support, but couldn't find anything
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Old 05-16-13, 05:01 PM
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berner
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I have had a hot spot on the ball of the foot in my ski boots and numbness with bike shoes. I agree with unterhausen that metatarsal pads are worth a try. In both instances a metatarsal pad under the insole solved the problem. Mine were home made for a trial which ended up working fine so I left them alone. But they are sold in pharmacies or on the web.
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Old 05-16-13, 05:06 PM
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unterhausen
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you can get cheap insoles with metatarsal pads built in. I have also used the pads that you get by themselves, but they are almost as much as the insoles and it's quite an effort to get them in the right place
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Old 05-16-13, 05:50 PM
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Have you checked out Northwave shoes? They are known for accommodating wide feet. I have their Goretex shoes (for touring) and I love them. Very comfortable. I use them with custom orthotic inserts.
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Old 05-17-13, 09:10 AM
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WeTommyD
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Originally Posted by napoleoninrags View Post
Have you checked out Northwave shoes? They are known for accommodating wide feet. I have their Goretex shoes (for touring) and I love them. Very comfortable. I use them with custom orthotic inserts.

No I have not tried the Northwave shoes. I'll see if any shops have them.
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Old 05-19-13, 01:15 PM
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I just recently got a set of Vittoria Blaze over the Hora since the straps accommodated my feet better than the cinch system. I'm quite happy with them!
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Old 05-19-13, 07:13 PM
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Plantar fasciitis

I've had a lot of trouble with PF over the last 3 years. The advice from my cycling podiatrist was to stick with the normal sport / walking orthotics. You need to be aware, however, that different podiatrists can come up with very different orthotic designs for any given patient: I have one pair that are virtually flat, and another (different podiatrist) that are high enough to elicit gasps from my cycle fitter (another podiatrist). The low ones exacerbate PF, the high ones are fine.

What made the biggest difference to me was midfoot cleat placement with Speedplay pedals. My PF is now under control. I needed the extra width from Northwave shoes to fit the large orthotics and have been really happy with them.

Oh, and DO NOT RUN ON CONCRETE until you're better!
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Old 05-22-13, 07:07 PM
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Sidi makes a mega wide shoe. Been riding it for years. Just got the 6.6. That, combined with orthotics has really helped eliminate my foot Neuropathy. If you ride Speedplays, you will need a stiffer sole to dissipate the pedal pressure than the 5.5's. Otherwise, ditch the Speedplays in favor of a bigger platform. I hate to give that advice because I have been riding Speedplays ever since they came out, but am making the switch to Looks.
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Old 05-25-13, 10:52 AM
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Realizing this is a bit of a thread hijack, I basically stopped riding (and running, and kick-biking) for two years when bad PF hit me a decade ago. Several runs through physical therapy, two very different sets of orthotics, and lots of tincture of time (my nurse-practitioner wife's go-to remedy) and I began to ride little by little again. The biggest equipment factor getting me back riding was to revert to platform pedals (had been using SPDs for years) to allow me to ride with the spindle much farther back under my foot (or foot far forward if you prefer). Even when the PF had settled down for a few years, efforts to reinstate my SPDs always led to flare-ups. Warpig's mention of "midfoot cleat placement with Speedplay pedals" is therefor fascinating -- do they somehow allow significantly rearward placement of the cleat compared to SPDs?
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Old 06-02-13, 08:04 PM
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Absolutely

Originally Posted by Omnicycler View Post
Realizing this is a bit of a thread hijack, I basically stopped riding (and running, and kick-biking) for two years when bad PF hit me a decade ago. Several runs through physical therapy, two very different sets of orthotics, and lots of tincture of time (my nurse-practitioner wife's go-to remedy) and I began to ride little by little again. The biggest equipment factor getting me back riding was to revert to platform pedals (had been using SPDs for years) to allow me to ride with the spindle much farther back under my foot (or foot far forward if you prefer). Even when the PF had settled down for a few years, efforts to reinstate my SPDs always led to flare-ups. Warpig's mention of "midfoot cleat placement with Speedplay pedals" is therefor fascinating -- do they somehow allow significantly rearward placement of the cleat compared to SPDs?
I hope this isn't too much of a hijack: I apologise if it is...

Speedplay offer a 'rearwards extension plate' for (way too much) extra money that allows you to locate the cleats close enough to mid foot. This has worked well for me, but no better than ordinary MTB SPD cleats in the extreme rearmost position on my LG MTB shoes. I prefer the Splledplay + Northwave combination because it's a more rigid setup: I guess this is probably mainly due to the mid foot position combined with my fairly stiff orthotics rather than the soles themselves.

Your observations on flat pedals are really interesting: they don't work for me AT ALL (and I've tried them plenty of times): I just don't seem to be able to find the right spot, and then consistently come back to it. I have a fairly demanding relationship between seat height and foot-over-pedal axle position and I just can't get it right with flats. I suspect that giving them a longer trial might help, but I always lose patience (and get sore knees...) and go back to cleats.
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Old 06-05-13, 03:46 PM
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If you can't get enough of a selection to try on shoes in stores, there's always the various online retailers that will take back anything for any reason, pretty much.
I don't have any major foot issues per se, but I do have slightly weird-shaped feet. My strategy to buy cycling shoes has generally been to go try on pretty much everything at every price, even the cheapo ones, figuring that heavier, lower-quality, less breathable shoes that really fit my feet are better than high end fancy ones that don't fit as well. For that matter, try on both men's and women's if they come in your size, because you never know. I'd like to like Sidi's, but the footbed is contoured in a way that really doesn't match my foot at all, so they are out of the question. I usually buy them a bit on the large side, which gives me room for thicker socks or swollen feet plus a basic Dr. Scholl's insole, which I cut to match the original insole and then put the original insole back in on top of. All else being equal though, I prefer shoes with three separate straps/buckles to ones with a single strap or a single set of laces because then I can tighten them independently and keep the middle one on the looser side. Personally, I seem to always end up with Shimanos, which seem to fit my feet the best.
If I tighten any of the straps too tightly my foot will start to go numb somewhere, but as long as I keep them just barely tight enough to keep my foot from sliding around, my feet are comfortable for as long as I need them to be.
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Old 06-06-13, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by napoleoninrags View Post
Have you checked out Northwave shoes? They are known for accommodating wide feet. I have their Goretex shoes (for touring) and I love them. Very comfortable. I use them with custom orthotic inserts.
About a year ago I switched from Sidi to Northwave shoes. Every problem I've had with my feet disappeared. After my last 600k, my feet were the only part of me that wasn't sore or tired in some way.
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