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wingless Bicycle Tools

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Old 05-15-18, 08:37 AM
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wingless
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wingless Bicycle Tools

There are a handfull of bicycle-specific tools that I find useful for maintaining my bicycle. These are shown and discussed here.

These products were purchased by me using cash from my pocket. I have zero affiliation and zero agreement w/ the manufacturers or w/ the vendors.
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Old 05-15-18, 08:39 AM
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Park Tool TL-5 Tire Levers

The skinny 700x23 tires on my bicycle are difficult to remove and replace. Even with extreme care I break those small plastic tire levers.

My choice to address this issue was the larger, metal Park Tool TL-5 tire levers.

These are high-quality tools. They work very well for my application. They appear to be durable, even for my application.

The TL-5 measures 8.04" long, 1.14" wide (widest point), 0.72" wide (narrow end), 0.20" thick (body) and 0.08" to 0.11" (thick on curved tip). There is a 15/64" through hole to permit wall hanging. The mass is 160g.

The pair of TL-5 tire lever tools has worked well when changing my skinny 700x23 tires, plus when changing easier tires.

I would not hesitate to recommend this tool.








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Old 05-15-18, 08:40 AM
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Park Tool SR-12 Sprocket Remover / Chain Whip

The SRAM 9-Speed cassette cogset on my bicycle requires usage of a chain whip when unscrewing the cassette lockring. I selected the Park Tool SR-12 Sprocket Remover / Chain Whip tool

The SR-12 measures 14" long, 2" wide, 0.13" thick (metal), 0.37" thick (cushion grip), whip 7 links, 7" long (whip length) and 1" hex wrench. The mass is 356g.

This is specified for 5-Speed to 12-Speed cassette cogset.

For my application, the chain whip permits the required immobilization of the SRAM cassette cogset, so that the cassette lockring may be unscrewed. For my SRAM I use the Park Tools FR-5.2 Freewheel Remover. Note that the whip is only required for loosening / unscrewing the cassette lockring, not for tightening.

The integrated 1" hex wrench is very handy for snugging the cassette lockring, as it perfectly fits the freewheel remover exterior hex.

On my bicycle I remove the quick release skewer to use the freewheel remover tool.

Once the SRAM cassette lockring is removed, the SRAM cassette cogset slides right off the hub. The smaller two cogs are loose, the larger ones are retained as a set using spacers, alignment pins, holes and a skinny long internal lock screw. The last time I disassembled the cassette cogset I put a dab of Loctite onto the long screw threads to resist unwanted loosening.

I would not hesitate to recommend this tool.














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Old 05-15-18, 08:41 AM
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Park Tool CC-2 Chain Checker

The Park Tool CC-2 Chain Checker is used to measure the chain stretch. It works on 7-Speed to 12-Speed chains. Mine is a 9-Speed chain.

The CC-2 measures 5.35" long, 0.40" wide (body) and 0.40 tall (body). The mass is 42g.

The chain wear (stretch) is important to measure to ensure that a worn chain does not degrade the cogs and chainrings. The measurement permits determination of the chain condition so that the replacement timing is appropriate.

The CC-2 has a set of pins and a moveable plate w/ a measurement scale. An instruction sheet is included.

Making the measurement is easy. Set the scale on 0%, insert the pins into the chain links, lightly push the arc plate until the pins are just snug, then read the measurement scale.

The included instructions state that 5,6,7,8 and 9-Speed chains should be replaced when the measurement is 0.75%. The 10, 11 and 12-Speed chains should be replaced when the measurement is 0.50%.

When I made the measurement, I performed this at multiple locations along the length. There was a small variability depending upon the location.

I would not hesitate to recommend this tool.




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Old 05-15-18, 08:42 AM
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Park Tool MLP-1.2 Master Link Pliers

The Park Tool MLP-1.2 Master Link Pliers are used to either disengage / separate / remove the chain master link, or to join the master link during chain replacement.

The SRAM PC-951 9-Speed chain used on my bicycle has a master link, a set of two identical plates, each with an identical pin. To assemble, a plate / pin assembly is pushed into the end hole on each side of the chain. The Pin is fit into the keyhole opening on the opposite plate, then the chain is pulled to catch the pin into the keyhole.

The tool usage is EASY. Grab onto the master link and squeeze the handle.

The tool has a nice cushion grip.

The MLP-1.2 measures 6.5" long, 2.18" wide (handle squeezed), 0.12" thick (each steel plate) and 0.66" thick (cushioned grip). The mass is 146g.

I would not hesitate to recommend this tool.




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Old 05-15-18, 08:44 AM
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Ultrasonic Cleaner - Vevor PS-30A 6 Liter 180W Ultrasonic 200W Heat

The Vevor PS-30A 6 Liter ultrasonic cleaner w/ 180W ultrasonic 200W heat is used for cleaning bicycle parts, like the chain and the cassette cogset.

The cleaner has separate digital touchpad controls and display for heat and for ultrasonic cleaning. One digital display shows setpoint temperature, up to 80C maximum and actual temperature. The other digital display is a countdown timer, showing selected cycle time, that counts down once started.

The cleaner measures 13" wide, 7" deep, 10" tall, 11" wide (tank), 5-3/4" front-to-back (tank) and 6" deep (tank). The basket measures 10" wide, 5" side-to-side and 3" deep. Capacity is 6.5 liters (nameplate). Heat power is 200W (nameplate) and 125W (measured). Ultrasonic power is 180W (nameplate) and 130W (measured).

The cleaner includes an Operation Manual, a tank basket and a 5' detachable grounded power cord. The tank has a drain w/ a turn shutoff valve. There are recessed handles on each side. There is a cover w/ integrated handle.

Operation of the cleaner is to fill w/ water, select the tank temperature and turn on the tank heat. My experience is that the measured temperature doesn't start increasing w/o also turning on the ultrasonic, so I turn on both, even w/o needing the ultrasonic, to get the desired temperature.

When I'm cleaning a chain, I put the chain into a small jar, add water and dish soap, then put the jar into the heated tank. I run the ultrasonic, hand shake the jar and repeat. When the jar water gets dirty I dump it out and fill it w/ fresh water and dish soap. This process gets the chain very, very clean. When I'm waxing I put mineral spirits into a jar, then the jar into the bath for heated cleaning. Then the same thing w/ denatured alcohol. Once completed the chain is ready for waxing.

For the cassette cogset, I drop all those parts into the basket and add dish soap into the tank water. The parts come out very clean.

This tool is fine for the cost. My preference would be that the heat would have acceptable response, to attain the setpoint temperature in less than an hour and would not require the untrasonic to be turned on to see the temperature rise.











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Old 05-15-18, 08:48 AM
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Double Pot Wax Warmer

A 220W double pot wax warmer was purchased to permit application of Molton Speed Wax to the chain.

Note that this reply shows my modifications to a UL appliance. These are show for informational purposes only. I strongly recommend AGAINST anyone ever modifying a UL appliance.

The adjustable temperature setpoint dial on the wax warmer front panel shows a maximum temperature of 80C. My measured maximum temperature was only 77C. The Molton Speed Wax is specified to be applied at 93C. I purchased an adjustable capillary tube thermostat w/ a 110C maximum setpoint. That thermostat also didn't get hot enough, so I modified the thermostat.

The warmer measures 12" wide (body), 14" wide (w/ handles), 7" deep and 5" tall. The pot measures 4" inside diameter and 2-3/4" deep. The front panel has dual temperature setpoin knobs, dual heater illuminated on/off switches and dual heat illumination lamps. There is a two prong attached polarized NEMA 1-15 power cord. The measured power is 115W on each pot, 230W total.

My solution to increasing the setpoint temperature was first to get a different thermostat, 110C maximum versus the existing 80C maximum. That different thermostat didin't get me to the desired 93C, so I modified that thermostat. I added 0.020" shim thickness to the sensing mechanism, now I can get whatever temperature is required.

When I am using this I put a thermocouple probe into the bath so I can accurately regulate the temperature. My modified warmer permits rapid warming to the desired 93C, then regulation at that temperature.

The Molton Speed Wax instructions are followed, including the specified advance chain cleaning steps.

One concern I had was the potential for degrading the wax warmer from operating at a greater temperature than designed. The degradation would be measured as a change in the heater element resistance, or as physical changes to the tape securing the heating element to the pot, or to the wire insulation. I made very accurate heater element resistance measurements before the device was ever turned on, then again after each usage. There has been no change. There is no degradation to the tape observed. The wire insulation is suitable for much higher temperatures, so this will be fine.

The thermostat modification was interesting to me. The capillary tube thermostat uses fluid-filled phial (vial), a bendable capillary tube and a diaphragm to sense the temperature and modulate the snap action thermostat. The fluid expands as the temperature increases, causing the diaphragm thickness to increase. The adjustment knob also acts on the diaphragm. These thickness changes are all very small. That's why the thin 0.020" spacer was able to effect the desired substantial change to the maximum temperature.

There are lots of ways to wax a chain. This was the one I selected. As always, safety first. Wax is flammable. Hot wax is a burn hazard.

The end result is acceptable. The hot wax permiates the internals of the chain and coats the external parts. The chain is clean to touch and quiet during usage.

Recently I got caught in a downpour. The result was enough chain wax got washed away that led me to repeat the application.















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Old 05-15-18, 08:49 AM
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If the tire levers are indeed metal, they will put a dent in the edge of the rim on some aluminum rims. Like my Ksyriums. Steel wheels probably not.
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Old 05-16-18, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
If the tire levers are indeed metal, they will put a dent in the edge of the rim on some aluminum rims. Like my Ksyriums. Steel wheels probably not.
Those Ksyrium wheels look very nice.



These TL-5 forged steel tire levers have been fine with my aluminum Bontrager Series 6000 ETRTO 622x15 rims. Thanks for the caution, I will remain careful to avoid damage.
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Old 05-16-18, 02:46 PM
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Park Tool SCW-SET.3 Shop Cone Wrench Set

This Park Tool SCW-SET.3 Shop Cone Wrench Set was purchased to permit proper servicing of my cup-and-cone wheel hub ball bearings.

My prior servicing was performed using the cheapo stamped steel wrench that was included w/ tools I no longer own. Those cheapo tools were marginally usable.

It is really nice to now have a proper set of tools for this service.

The ball bearing cone nut requires a thin wrench, so a standard combination wrench is too fat for the cone nut flats and cannot be used.

The Park Tool SCW-SET.3 shop cone wrench set includes 14 wrenches. These are: 13mm; 14mm; 15mm; 16mm; 17mm; 18mm; 19mm; 20mm; 21mm; 22mm; 23mm; 24mm; 26mm and 28mm.

All wrenches have the handle dipped in a blue vinyl, 3-7/8" long, w/ white printing showing the size and part number. All wrenches have a small hole in the handle for a wall hanging hook. The steel is 0.085" thick. The cushioned grip is 0.21" thick. The overall length on the smaller wrenches, 13mm to 20mm is 8", on the medium wrenches, 21mm to 24mm is 8-1/8" and on the large wrenches 26mm and 28mm is 8-3/8". The handle width on the smaller wrenches, 13mm to 24mm is 7/8" and on the large wrenches, 26mm and 28mm is 1". The mass ranges from 76g to 102g.

I would not hesitate to recommend these tools.






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Old 06-08-18, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by wingless View Post
This Park Tool SCW-SET.3 Shop Cone Wrench Set was purchased to permit proper servicing of my cup-and-cone wheel hub ball bearings.

My prior servicing was performed using the cheapo stamped steel wrench that was included w/ tools I no longer own. Those cheapo tools were marginally usable.

It is really nice to now have a proper set of tools for this service.

The ball bearing cone nut requires a thin wrench, so a standard combination wrench is too fat for the cone nut flats and cannot be used.

The Park Tool SCW-SET.3 shop cone wrench set includes 14 wrenches. These are: 13mm; 14mm; 15mm; 16mm; 17mm; 18mm; 19mm; 20mm; 21mm; 22mm; 23mm; 24mm; 26mm and 28mm.

All wrenches have the handle dipped in a blue vinyl, 3-7/8" long, w/ white printing showing the size and part number. All wrenches have a small hole in the handle for a wall hanging hook. The steel is 0.085" thick. The cushioned grip is 0.21" thick. The overall length on the smaller wrenches, 13mm to 20mm is 8", on the medium wrenches, 21mm to 24mm is 8-1/8" and on the large wrenches 26mm and 28mm is 8-3/8". The handle width on the smaller wrenches, 13mm to 24mm is 7/8" and on the large wrenches, 26mm and 28mm is 1". The mass ranges from 76g to 102g.

I would not hesitate to recommend these tools.







This has been a very useful thread.


With Cone Wrench sets, I have held off so far, simply because I understand you may only need two or three wrenches and maybe even two of the same size, for one's wheels.


What has been your experience here?
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Old 06-08-18, 05:40 AM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
This has been a very useful thread.
Thanks much.

Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
With Cone Wrench sets, I have held off so far, simply because I understand you may only need two or three wrenches and maybe even two of the same size, for one's wheels.

What has been your experience here?
Yes, I also knew exactly which wrenches I currently require for my existing bicycles, so I could have saved cost by purchasing just those wrenches. I instead decided to get the entire set.

On my bikes they don't use the same size. On my bikes, only one wrench must be a cone wrench, the other can be a regular combination wrench.
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Old 06-08-18, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by wingless View Post
This Park Tool SCW-SET.3 Shop Cone Wrench Set was purchased to permit proper servicing of my cup-and-cone wheel hub ball bearings.

My prior servicing was performed using the cheapo stamped steel wrench that was included w/ tools I no longer own. Those cheapo tools were marginally usable.
This shows the cheapo stamped steel flat wrenches that I was using.

The jaw opening was modified w/ a file to permit usage on my cone nuts.

There were instances where the nuts were too tight and these tools would not work.


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Old 09-21-18, 08:06 PM
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A 15mm pedal wrench was required for pedal removal / replacement for proper shipment packaging of my bicycle in my transit case.

The tool I selected was the 15mm Park Tool PW-5 pedal wrench.

This is a well made tool. It is easy to use.

The thin metal wrench fits nicely into the tight gap between the pedal and the crank. The long arm provides sufficient leverage to apply enough torque for removal / replacement.

The metal blade is dull and black. The handle is coated in glossy blue plastic w/ white lettering. There is a handle hole so this may be hung on a hook.

These are the tool measurements:
11-1/2" Long
0.14" Thick, metal
0.24" Thick, handle
258g Mass
3/8" DIA, handle hole

This is a well made tool that I would not hesitate to recommend.




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