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What to expect in Pittsburgh Mount Washington area

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What to expect in Pittsburgh Mount Washington area

Old 08-02-18, 04:50 PM
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El Gato27
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What to expect in Pittsburgh Mount Washington area

My son will start working in this area beginning in Sept. We were discussing what kind of bike he should take. We do not know the terrain (flat/hilly/mixed) or what bike paths are available.
We ride mainly hike and bike trails here in Austin, TX. We gone out a few times on road bikes.
Any info would be appreciated.
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Old 08-04-18, 04:36 AM
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Pittsburgh offers some very nice rail trails. www.traillink.com will give you a pretty good idea of what's in the area.
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Old 08-07-18, 05:47 AM
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Certainly hilly. Pittsburg NH and the Connecticut Lakes area is one of my favorite places. It’s a big ATV and snowmobiling mecca and I’m not aware of any dedicated bike trails that far north. As the previous poster said, check trail links and read the reviews.I recall riding a logging road that paralleled the Connecticut River near the border.

My guess is a bike that works for both pavement and some not too technical single track and gravel roads would be best. There are many more miles of gravel roads than paved roads not only there but anywhere in northern New England.

BTW, a short hike that skirts the international border and takes you to a little pond which is the Connecticut River’s source. As you hike around the pond at one point you step over the Connecticut where it begins its journey south. Great paddling opportunities on the lakes, too.
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Old 08-08-18, 05:08 PM
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Thanks for the info, so maybe a hybrid. The choice is either a road bike or a hybrid.
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Old 08-08-18, 05:15 PM
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The OP is referring to Pittsburgh PA. The Mt Washington area is indeed hilly. A hybrid seems like a good choice. A road bike works too but you likely will need to change gearing until you get into shape for the hills.
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Old 08-08-18, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by StanSeven View Post
The OP is referring to Pittsburgh PA. The Mt Washington area is indeed hilly. A hybrid seems like a good choice. A road bike works too but you likely will need to change gearing until you get into shape for the hills.
Thanks - I made the Pittsburg NH assumption because itís near Mt. Washington NH.
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Old 08-09-18, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by El Gato27 View Post
We do not know the terrain (flat/hilly/mixed) or what bike paths are available.
Went to law school there. Other than in the downtown area, expect lots of hills.

Pittsburg is the northern terminus of the wildly popular Great Allegheny Passage Trail: https://gaptrail.org/
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Old 08-09-18, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Greenhil View Post


Thanks - I made the Pittsburg NH assumption because itís near Mt. Washington NH.
Interesting. Because I went to law school at Pitt, when I read your fist post I said to myself "Wut". But your explanation now has me wondering if there is a connection. From what I could find on Wiki, the NH city was incorporated in 1840. Mount Washington in PA was originally called "Coal Hill," but by 1847 the name had been changed to Mount Washington. Could be a coincidence. Could be a connection.
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Old 09-09-18, 01:24 PM
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Allegheny County and the surrounding area are extremely hilly and windy. I would not recommend commuting on a bicycle - especially from Mount Washington as both major routes into the neighborhood lead to major expressway. They don't call it "Mount Washington" for nothing, either: it features the most scenic view in the area and to get there you have to go up some windy and steep streets.
If your son is moving there and he wants to ride recreationally, I'd suggest he ride his bike to the Monongahela Incline, pay $2.50 to ride it down to Station Square and jump on the South Side Trail out east to the Homestead section of town and eventually on to the Great Allegheny Passage that starts in McKeesport. He can ride around the city itself but it's a bit disconnected as he will have to cross the Smithfield Bridge and fight traffic around the Golden Triangle. Once he finds his way to Point State Park though, it's a pretty easy ride across the Fort Duquesne Bridge to the North Shore.
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Old 09-09-18, 01:41 PM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Interesting. Because I went to law school at Pitt, when I read your fist post I said to myself "Wut". But your explanation now has me wondering if there is a connection. From what I could find on Wiki, the NH city was incorporated in 1840. Mount Washington in PA was originally called "Coal Hill," but by 1847 the name had been changed to Mount Washington. Could be a coincidence. Could be a connection.
George Washington was a colonel in the British Loyalist Army in the 1750s. He was sent to the area by the governor of Virginia to parlay with the French who had claimed the area. It set the stage for the French and Indian War and resulted in the erection of Forts Duquesne (by the French) then Fort Pitt (by the British) and the eventual establishment of the city of "Pittsborough.".
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Old 09-24-18, 10:09 AM
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I'm late to this party, but here are a couple of links that you and your son might find helpful:

https://www.bikepgh.org/ - the local bike advocacy group. They publish an excellent paper map. It shows preferred routes, dedicated trails, sharrows, and often indicates what routes are steep. They and also have an interactive map online: https://www.bikepgh.org/resources/ma...re/map-routes/

https://friendsoftheriverfront.org/ non-profit that takes care of the Three Rivers Heritage Trail. They also have a map, but it's more restricted to the trail.

A hybrid would work, but I'd look for one without a front suspension to save weight. Look for one with wider tires to soak up bumps.

Canton Street, the steepest street in the US, is on Mt. Washington. One section of it reportedly has a 37% gradient.
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