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What are mtb xc races like

Old 04-21-05, 09:01 PM
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mgomez41
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What are mtb xc races like

Im pretty knew to the sport for now i plan just to bike for fun and to up my cardio endurance but one day id like to try an xc mtb race and i have no clue what they consist of

what are mtb xc races like and how long are they usually
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Old 04-22-05, 02:48 AM
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The XC races I've started doing have begginer, sport, expert/open/cash classes. they all use the same course loop exept the beginner may have a very technical/steep/hard section bypassed. The beginners may do one or two laps, the sport two or three laps and the expert 3 or 4 laps. Laps are about 6 miles of challanging single track, give or take a mile, with 30 minutes as a fast lap time and 45 minutes to one hour as a back of the pack lap time. some dirt roads are mixed in to connect the single track and provide a spot to really stand on it.

I'm sure races in other places vary quite a bit though and then there are 24 hour XC races.

As for the racing, well it's racing, which means everyone is trying to win so it is non stop hard to maximal cranking and brakes are only used on a downhill if a corner is comming up or the dude in front of you is in the way.

I was quite suprised by the speed on the trail when I did my first race, even on levelish ground. Note that I signed up for the sport class, not the beginner class, for my first race, I didn't want to bypass the crazy section and one lap didn't seem enough(one would have been enough in hindsight ). My day job uses a fair amount of leg muscle, so with no good rest for my legs, they hurt for 4 or 5 days after the race, a good hurt though.
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Old 04-22-05, 05:37 AM
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IMO the best thing to do when debating racing is to do at least one race in the beginner class. It will give you an idea of what you got yourself into, plus once you do a race in the sport class it is frowned upon to drop to beginner.

In the races around here the beginner class is usally about 10 - 12 miles. The sport class is generally 17-22 miles and the expert course is generally 20 - 25 miles. There is always a lot of climbing, sometimes single track and sometimes fire roads but climbing none the less. Most of the single track downhill and flat is very quick and somewhat technical, however there are a couple of courses that are just down right nasty. My advice is always try to preride the course, this will let you know how hard you can go and when, otherwise there is a really good chance you will blow up.

My last race started off really fast. I ended up struggling for about 5 of the 17 miles. After a couple of gu's I actually started feeling better though. I ended up going all out for 92 minutes, I gave the course everything I had and finished 11th out of 31 in the sport (19-34 year old) class. I ended up going a little too hard though considering that I was praying to the porcelain god the whole evening after the race, I felt like I was going to die. The whole time I was thinking about what I need to do differently next time to win the sprint at the end of the race.

Here is a great write up on the race, unfortunately I am the one that lost the sprint finish. Even though it was a sprint for 10th place it was just as intense as it would have been if it was a sprint for the win.

https://www.grassrootsriding.com/PRHSSCMountwood.html
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Old 04-22-05, 02:16 PM
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These guys are right on the money.
Racing is a whole new realm. Keep in mind that most of the other entrants will have race experience and this is key. It's hard to get a feel for it until you actually do it. The Beginner class is pretty much a sprint. No resting. No easy pace. It's pass or be passed.
Also be aware (and not discouraged) that some very good riders will enter the Beginner class in hopes of placing.
Classes are divided by skill level (Beginner, Sport and Expert/Pro) and by age and gender. Measure yourself by your specific group and above all else....practice, practice, practice (and have fun).
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Old 05-01-05, 09:19 AM
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How did you train for the races? If I wanted to get into racing, I'd definitely have to step up my riding frequency and distance ... any one have any *rough* suggestions?
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Old 05-01-05, 10:03 AM
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When I first started racing in the beginner class all I did was ride as much as I could. Now that I am getting serious about it I'm putting about the same amount of time in on the road bike as on my mountain bike. When you're just starting though just get as much time in the saddle as possible.
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Old 05-01-05, 06:22 PM
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It really is a whole new world man

When I was first getting into mtb'ing late last summer - and into last winter I was still pretty tenative riding downhill, compared to my buddies, although b/c of my running and road background I could keep up and pass on most uphills.

XC racing is balls to the wall, the whole race. That includes downhill - in the few races I've done I'll kill most people uphills - but the downhills are really kind of equalizers, since there is only so fast you can go riding that razor edge of control (touch the brakes, and you'll get passed).

Good times though, just get confident and in good shape and give it a try. It's the only way you'll learn!
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Old 05-02-05, 08:52 AM
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I wouldn't worry too much about training when you are first getting into it. Just ride and have fun. If you do a couple of races and enjoy it then start worrying about training.

My first season I had a blast racing beginner. All I did was ride my mountain bike then go to the races. My second year I moved up to sport and I tried the same routine, didn't work too well. The courses were twice as long and the riders were twice as fast. That year hurt me. I started doing a lot of road riding and spent a bunch of time at the gym. This year is going much better for me. I'm still not a top five racer but I have placed in the top ten in three out of the four races I have competed in this year. I'm hoping next year I will be a top five racer.

Anyway, here is my basic routine.

Monday - Upper body at the gym and 40 minutes cardio
Tuesday - Road ride with climbing, typically 40 - 60 miles
Wednesday - Road ride with intervals or mountain bike ride
Thursday - Upper body at the gym and 40 minutes cardio
Friday - Easy ride or cardio at the gym, sometimes take this day off
Saturday - Easy ride to loosen legs up, minimal climbing
Sunday - Race

It's pretty bad but I don't spend nearly as much time on the mountain bike as I used to. I am much faster than I used to be though.
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Old 05-02-05, 01:11 PM
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I rode my first race this March. I was scared, afraid I'd be embarassed. I finished like 16 of 19 overall, but had an awesome time. I even passed someone at the end. You do work your ass off, and I felt like I wanted to die. However, once I crossed the finish line I couldn't wait to do it again. That night I was on the Internet looking for the next race.
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Old 05-02-05, 02:44 PM
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how much is the average entrance fee? I'm looking at getting into it. I guess I'll just try to ride the crap out of my bike before then.
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Old 05-02-05, 05:45 PM
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Around here the races are typically $25 - $30 for WVMBA (West Virginia Mountain Bike Association) members and $30 - $35 for non members. Membership is $25 a year. I believe NORBA races are about the same price plus membership, you can buy a one day NORBA licenses though.
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Old 05-03-05, 12:32 PM
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Anyone know some good races in CO this summer between July and Augest.
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Old 05-06-05, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by UAEBiker
Anyone know some good races in CO this summer between July and Augest.
Hi all, I usually post on the Roadie forum. So, I guess I'm kinda new to a lot of you here. The heart of my cycling experience was forged on a mountain bike 18 years ago and I've never forgotten it. But I spend a lot of time on my road single. I got a new XC rig last summer. It's a Titus Racer X 100. I love it as much as the Yo Eddy I raced on for 11 years.

I live in Summit County, CO. Here we have the Summit Mountain Challenge. The race promoter is Maverick Sports. Winter Park also has a great series also.

Come on over to Summit and have a go at it.

Most XC races start like a time trial ...wicked fast starts. So for training it really helps to practice those dreaded intervals. If you have a trainer, bring it to the race. I know it looks a little geeky to spin a trainer before a race. But nothing beats having your legs warmed up with a few intervals and a 'bit of medium intensity spinning to boot.

Go get 'em. Woof!
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Old 05-06-05, 08:15 PM
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telenick - great choice on the Yo Eddy, most of the people riding now have no idea what that bike was, in my opinion it was the best bike ever built. My brother had one that was stolen two years ago from a bike shop while it was being serviced. I've had my eye out for one for about five years now for myself. That bike is probably the main reason I ended up buying an IF roadie.

btw, sorry I got off topic.
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Old 05-11-05, 10:02 AM
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I agree. It was one of the best rigs I have ever ridden. Chris Chance was a genius at building a rig that could handle twisty single track with amazing agility. I heard that he assisted Chris Cocalis on Titus' rear triangle design. That was main the reason I chose the Titus over the Yeti ...that and the firm platform of their rear triangle with the FSR 4 bar.
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Old 05-12-05, 11:12 AM
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Old 05-12-05, 11:13 AM
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HARDCORE
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Old 06-03-05, 06:56 PM
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The thing about beginning to race as a beginner racer is to finish the race - if you do well, check out the race board times & double your time to compare your time agianst the sport times. Maybe do a few more beginner races and figure your class out later.

Train for double your average race length. Begin hydrating the day before the race. Eat & sleep well. Learn to change a flat quick - remove that little tube cover before the race so you don't have to take it off, get some CO2, get a chain tool or a chain that takes a connex link. Make sure you have water and food - GU or something... although those orange "circus peanuts" have the same stuff that GU has in it - they do get sticky, though. Sun-block, chap stick, antiseptic stuff.

And - racing in the rain/muddy conditions - bring a plastic bag for your muddy/wet clothes & shoes (those supermarket bags are fine), and a towel. Even if there are no showers, at least your car won't wear the real estate if you have something to wipe off with!

If there's no post-race meal (a staple in WV but not elsewhere), bring some after race food - fruit (bananas, apples, melon, grapes) to start, and then something more substantial - you will be hungry. If you plan to drive yourself home, allow enough time after finishing for your body to recover, or you'll be brain dead on the road, which may well end your racing career and life.

Most of all, make sure it's FUN!
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Old 06-04-05, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by apclassic9

Begin hydrating the day before the race. Eat & sleep well.
You want to start hydrating a few days before you plan to race. A day in advance won't cut it.
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Old 07-02-05, 08:25 PM
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Instuctions For XC Racing

1. Eat tons of Chef Boyardee the night before
2. Get to the race
3. Win it.

Enjoy!
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