Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Mountain Biking
Reload this Page >

How do 2011 components compare against a 2016?

Notices
Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

How do 2011 components compare against a 2016?

Old 05-05-16, 11:16 AM
  #1  
sakau2007
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Hoover, AL
Posts: 61

Bikes: 2015 Cannondale CAAD 8 105

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How do 2011 components compare against a 2016?

I'm looking at spending about $1000 on a mountain bike but am having trouble comparing the quality of components from 5 years ago to today.

The way I understand it, things trickle down so Alivio today might be better than Deore 5 years ago.

I am looking at a 2011 Trek Remedy 8 bike which MSRP'd for over $3k. Rear Derailleur is Deore XT and front Derailleur is SLX. These components are higher on the ladder than Deores that I can afford in the 2015/2016 models, but are they actually superior components because they are 5 years old?
sakau2007 is offline  
Old 05-05-16, 12:58 PM
  #2  
Canker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,565
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 261 Post(s)
Liked 115 Times in 69 Posts
The drivetrain is fine. The only real differences on current bikes is you won't find a 3x10 setup on higherend bikes anymore. They would be either a 2x10 or much more likely in the $3k price range a 1x11. The 26er wheel is the part that is out dated on that bike. There is absolutely nothing wrong with 26ers but it is going to get harder and harder to find parts, higherend parts mainly, for them. Still that is a very nice bike and new for a $1k you won't get anywhere near to it. Just make sure the suspension fork and shock have been serviced.
Canker is offline  
Old 05-05-16, 01:34 PM
  #3  
I <3 Robots
Senior Member
 
I <3 Robots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,657

Bikes: Cervelo S2, Workswell 062, Banshee Spitfire

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Functionality is going to be the same. The new rear derailleurs (Shadow Plus) will have a clutch in them. This will keep the chain from slapping against the chainstay when going over extremely rough terrain. Otherwise, you probably won't notice a difference.
I <3 Robots is offline  
Old 05-05-16, 07:42 PM
  #4  
Ronsonic 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sunny Tampa, Florida
Posts: 1,540
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 36 Posts
IMO, the thing to be concerned with that bike is wear and tear, not whether the technology is up to date. Bikes were shifting well 20 years ago, any improvements since five years ago have been minor and incremental. The fork and shock on that were top of the line then and not far off of it now. I wouldn't worry about 26" wheels going out of date, there's a huge pipeline of parts out there.
Ronsonic is offline  
Old 05-06-16, 06:30 AM
  #5  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,705
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 417 Post(s)
Liked 68 Times in 60 Posts
Another big difference in the last 6 years or so is the cassette, back in 2010, everything was a standard Shimano type 8/9/10 speed spline, now you have XD drive from SRAM, and although the Shimano spec hasn't changed, mid range and up is all 11 speed (with SLX going 11 for M7000).

Brakes have massively improved as well, with both performance, and ease of servicing from all major manufactures.

If looking at the lower levels, groupsets like Alivio M4000 are pretty great, and a major improvement over their earlier version.
jimc101 is offline  
Old 05-06-16, 11:00 AM
  #6  
FrozenK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,036
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'd worry more about the condition and performance of the suspension than the derailleurs. Replacing derailleurs for new stuff is relatively cheap. Replacing the fork or frame? Not so much.

So provided the bike is in good shape, yes you'll be getting a better bike than a $1000 will buy you new.
FrozenK is offline  
Old 05-06-16, 04:23 PM
  #7  
osco53
Old Fart In Training
 
osco53's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,266
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 16 Posts
Nothing wrong with used,,,IF
IF
you know how to check things out like a bike shop mechanic would. My Advice would be to have a bike smart friend come along, He/She will not be biased by nice paint.

Example:
A bike ridden with a slightly loose head set on true single track trails can take the neck out of round on an aluminum bike, This can be hidden
temporarily by an adjustment but the frame is really expensive garage wall art, nothing more...

Do you know about small missing paint chips on welds ? Easily covered but can be spotted by looking real real close...
Bikes Toma hawked end over end down a Gnarly trail can have out of line chain stays,, Precise frame alignment measurement's should be made. Do you Know how ?
Things like this would concern me..

I know a rider who bought a new Trek Fuel 9,8,,$5,000
His thing was BIG AIR,, The bike was not able to cope with that kind of riding..
He repaired it and got $3,000 out of a guy,,IMO that bike was worth $1000 for parts,,,follow me ?

The remedy Is a fairly aggressive bike and most likely was ridden that way..
Or,, It could be a Garage queen,, If so you have a moral obligation to rescue the bike and ride it to death

Your original question,,My Opinion,, Mountain biking Is hard on components, 2011 parts should be very worn..

Last edited by osco53; 05-06-16 at 04:32 PM.
osco53 is offline  
Old 05-07-16, 12:56 AM
  #8  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,705
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 417 Post(s)
Liked 68 Times in 60 Posts
Originally Posted by osco53 View Post
Your original question,,My Opinion,, Mountain biking Is hard on components, 2011 parts should be very worn..
Totally agree with this, if using a MTB off road, 2 years is a very good life expectancy for a lot of parts, chainring get chipped teeth/worn, RD's bent, wheels break. Forks can wear on the stanchions, which often writes them off, and they also need regular maintenance, frame get scratched and dented, the list goes on.

There are plenty of MTB's which have been bought, ridden once, and put away, these can be great buys, but you need to check/know what to look for.
jimc101 is offline  
Old 05-07-16, 08:24 AM
  #9  
Canker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,565
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 261 Post(s)
Liked 115 Times in 69 Posts
Parts also get replaced when they get worn. My 2011 full suspension bike has gone through a couple chains and a bottom bracket because of wear but not much else. Other things have been upgraded like the wheels, crank, most of the drivetrain, and brakes but the old stuff was still fine at the time we just like to upgrade things . Just have somebody that knows what to look for look it over.

Last edited by Canker; 05-07-16 at 08:27 AM.
Canker is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
larso
Road Cycling
4
05-04-16 05:09 PM
captronk
Touring
3
01-01-16 08:06 PM
MKCity
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
9
09-04-15 03:01 PM
d2create
Mountain Biking
3
08-02-15 06:18 PM
cydewaze
Mountain Biking
2
05-03-15 08:18 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.