Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-07-16, 02:22 PM   #1
sahil687
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Starter mountain bike

Hello!

I am new to mountain biking. I need help picking out a mountian bike that fits my budget. Currently looking at Talon 4 from Giant ($625). It is a bit over my budget but the store manager said you cant find a good starter bike that is below $600. Now is that true?

Please recommend few more options. I am looking to spend around $400. I am 6'0" tall and weigh 155

Thanks everyone!
sahil687 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-16, 02:31 PM   #2
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 5,416
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 633 Post(s)
Do you actually plan to use it as a mountain bike?
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-16, 06:31 PM   #3
osco53
Old Fart In Training
 
osco53's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 2,223
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
I know a guy on a $500 Trek that rides with and easily keeps up with $3,000 bikes.
I know a guy who built a single speed single rear rim brake CX bike, he likes to hunt down and spank those full squish boutique bikes costing well north of $3000.

Your LBS shop guy Is pretty much telling you the truth, $600 should get you Hydraulic brakes, a 3 x 9 and a Suntour XS XR or XC what ever fork. You are light enough to get by on that fork for a season IF you don't go out to,, 'Get Air'
My local trek dealer sells new HT mtb's at the lowest level for I think about $475 tax Included, Rim brakes,,they work ok until things get wet or muddy..

Don't forget, your gonna need a helmet, decent pedals, (The plastic ones that come with low end bikes fold, very painful..), and a way to carry water, tools, a tube and such. Gloves would be smart, Injuries are very expensive..

Can you find a used bike ?
Got any real friends you TRUST that know mountain bikes that can go with you and Inspect a used bike..
A friend will not biased by the need to buy today, he/she would be far more subjective.. follow me ?

A secondary good source for used lower end bikes Is to go hang out at the trail head and ask the riders what they ride, what they rode and why. Ask If anyone has a used bike,,, bet they can tell you of someone who does~~

Know this:
You will NEED a local bike shop,, so paying an extra hundred now will be well worth It.
They tend to carry more parts on hand for what they sell and tend to help you more...

Last edited by osco53; 09-07-16 at 06:44 PM.
osco53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 06:54 AM   #4
hig4s
Senior Member
 
hig4s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Florida
Bikes: Giant Stance, Wife has Liv Cypress, son has Motobecane HT529 daughter has my 20 year old Huffy
Posts: 514
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
If you have the ability to assemble your own bike, BikesDirect Motobecane bikes are about the same quality as the Talon, the 529HT for $399 has virtually the same gears except SRAM derailleurs, same hydraulic disc brakes, and a similar 100mm fork,. On the 529HT at 6ft you could probably go medium or large frame.

Also Giant Talon 4 is last years model and they don't make it any more, so if you like it, offer them less.
hig4s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 07:23 AM   #5
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE
Posts: 7,052
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2697 Post(s)
The only real issue with buying a cheap mountain bike is the fork---the fork will range from garbage to often not a real impediment,, but never likely do much goods. But----the bike will get you out on the trails, having fun and learning skills and ...well, riding a bike.

Suntour has (I believe, I haven't researched it in a couple months) a reasonable upgrade program---after a year of thrashing the stock fork, you can get a decent deal on a better one (and you will want to.) But first, you get a year (or a season, depending where yo live) of biking fun, and cans save up the several hundred needed to get a real fork.

So ... yes, except for the fork, you can get a fine entry-level MTB within your budget ... and the fork will last a while unless you like to get big air
Maelochs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 09:41 AM   #6
sahil687
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Do you actually plan to use it as a mountain bike?
Yes I do.
sahil687 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 09:48 AM   #7
sahil687
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by hig4s View Post
If you have the ability to assemble your own bike, BikesDirect Motobecane bikes are about the same quality as the Talon, the 529HT for $399 has virtually the same gears except SRAM derailleurs, same hydraulic disc brakes, and a similar 100mm fork,. On the 529HT at 6ft you could probably go medium or large frame.

Also Giant Talon 4 is last years model and they don't make it any more, so if you like it, offer them less.
So 529HT does look good. Hopefully, I can assemble it watching tutorials and asking for help. Would you please give me more details on if its the right way to go for someone who is just starting off?

Thanks
sahil687 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 09:52 AM   #8
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 5,416
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 633 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sahil687 View Post
So 529HT does look good. Hopefully, I can assemble it watching tutorials and asking for help. Would you please give me more details on if its the right way to go for someone who is just starting off?

Thanks
If it were me, I would just go with your lbs, and listen to their advise. Mountain biking is hard on gear and you will, or may need your bike shop's services.
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 09:54 AM   #9
deex
Senior Member
 
deex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: West Palm Beach FL
Bikes: Giant TCR SL 1, Niner Air 9, Motobecane Fantom Cross Pro
Posts: 165
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
If you can spend a little more money then this one is really good:

Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29Elite

The components are above an entry level bike at any shop for the price.

You get a RockShox XC30 which is decent. A decent Shimano SLX 3x10 drivetrain and really nice brakes along with decent rims.

The frame is top notch. You can assemble most of the bike yourself, and maybe pay the shop a few bucks to adjust your derailleurs for you. That is the one part that I find the most daunting for me.

One other option is changing the seat as it is not that good, but no entry level MTB has a good seat.

For comparison I bought a Specialized Rockhopper for the same price and it came with a crappy shock, crappy drivetrain, and crappy brakes. I have upgraded all the components and it is better than the Motobecane, but it started worse for the same money.

The other Motobecane that was mentioned here is the same frame but with a different shock. The one thing I hated the most about the Rockhopper is the shock. So heavy and it did not do anything. I upgraded to a RockShox Recon Solo Air and the difference was day and night.

Also every LBS will work on your bike. The tune ups that they give you are not worth the extra price IMHO. You can still bring it in for any service. I had a brake warranty repair on my Motobecane and my LBS took care of it for me since the are a SRAM authorized dealer. This was not a fault of the bike, but the component failing within the year warranty.

Good luck!
deex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 10:59 AM   #10
hig4s
Senior Member
 
hig4s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Florida
Bikes: Giant Stance, Wife has Liv Cypress, son has Motobecane HT529 daughter has my 20 year old Huffy
Posts: 514
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by deex View Post
If you can spend a little more money then this one is really good:

Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29Elite

The components are above an entry level bike at any shop for the price.

You get a RockShox XC30 which is decent. A decent Shimano SLX 3x10 drivetrain and really nice brakes along with decent rims.

The frame is top notch. You can assemble most of the bike yourself, and maybe pay the shop a few bucks to adjust your derailleurs for you. That is the one part that I find the most daunting for me.

One other option is changing the seat as it is not that good, but no entry level MTB has a good seat.

For comparison I bought a Specialized Rockhopper for the same price and it came with a crappy shock, crappy drivetrain, and crappy brakes. I have upgraded all the components and it is better than the Motobecane, but it started worse for the same money.

The other Motobecane that was mentioned here is the same frame but with a different shock. The one thing I hated the most about the Rockhopper is the shock. So heavy and it did not do anything. I upgraded to a RockShox Recon Solo Air and the difference was day and night.

Also every LBS will work on your bike. The tune ups that they give you are not worth the extra price IMHO. You can still bring it in for any service. I had a brake warranty repair on my Motobecane and my LBS took care of it for me since the are a SRAM authorized dealer. This was not a fault of the bike, but the component failing within the year warranty.

Good luck!
While the 3x10 is very nice, the Rock Shock fork is still coil, not that much better than the Suntour, I personally wouldn't spend more than the 529HT unless I was getting a full air fork. Full air is a big difference, not needed for a beginner, but with a full air fork you would have a bike that could last a long time for all types of riding.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
If it were me, I would just go with your lbs, and listen to their advise. Mountain biking is hard on gear and you will, or may need your bike shop's services.
Not bad advice, but dependent on you mechanical ability. None of this stuff is that hard, but if you have never done much before it can be frustrating. Most local bike shops will work on other brands if you need help, but the cost if you cannot do it yourself my negate any savings you get by buying online. If you live in NE Florida or Orlando, or Houston TX, there are actual bikes direct stores where you get the same price and they assembly them.

If you are confident you won't need LBS help, buy online. If not, try offering you LBS $500 for last year's Talon 4 and get the LBS support.
hig4s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 11:09 AM   #11
deex
Senior Member
 
deex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: West Palm Beach FL
Bikes: Giant TCR SL 1, Niner Air 9, Motobecane Fantom Cross Pro
Posts: 165
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by hig4s View Post
While the 3x10 is very nice, the Rock Shock fork is still coil, not that much better than the Suntour, I personally wouldn't spend more than the 529HT unless I was getting a full air fork. Full air is a big difference, not needed for a beginner, but with a full air fork you would have a bike that could last a long time for all types of riding.
I had the Suntour XCT on the Hardrock and it is a POS. The XC30 is way better quality, believe me I have ridden both.

The few hundred dollars more get you way better components over the 529HT. You can't even compare an Altus 8 Speed to a SLX 10 speed. I had the altus on the rockhopper, not worth it. Heck, you even get metal pedals that are decent!

I also debated between the two, the Comp won over. The frame is also a tad nicer. The wheels, drivetrain and brakes can not be bought separately with the price difference. This is how I saw it.
deex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 11:21 AM   #12
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 5,416
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 633 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by hig4s View Post
While the 3x10 is very nice, the Rock Shock fork is still coil, not that much better than the Suntour, I personally wouldn't spend more than the 529HT unless I was getting a full air fork. Full air is a big difference, not needed for a beginner, but with a full air fork you would have a bike that could last a long time for all types of riding.





Not bad advice, but dependent on you mechanical ability. None of this stuff is that hard, but if you have never done much before it can be frustrating. Most local bike shops will work on other brands if you need help, but the cost if you cannot do it yourself my negate any savings you get by buying online. If you live in NE Florida or Orlando, or Houston TX, there are actual bikes direct stores where you get the same price and they assembly them.

If you are confident you won't need LBS help, buy online. If not, try offering you LBS $500 for last year's Talon 4 and get the LBS support.
Most local bike shops will do free adjustments for a year, maybe two. And if you go with the bike shop, you get a recognizable brand that you could sell and get some of your money back for, if you decide to upgrade in a couple of years. Bikes direct offers comparable, though generic products for about 30% less than a local bike shop. But you get no local support and if there is a problem, you have to box the bike up and send it back to them, which could be a hassle.
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-16, 12:08 PM   #13
Canker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,060
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
The whole free adjustments thing is highly overrated if you are at all mechanically inclined. These are bikes not rocket science. Adjusting a derailleur or changing a clable is simple and something you need to know who to do on your own anyway. Truing a wheel or bleeding brakes can be a little tricky but most people should be able to handle those following a write up on the web or a youtube video as well. The resale thing is true but we are talking about a $400 to $600 a bike here. None of them are going to have much resale value. Warranty work is going to be a lot less of a hassle to deal with if you need to take advantage of it with a LBS bike but Bikedirect still offers a warranty.

This is where I say I'd go used. People buy entry level bikes all the time and one of two things happen

1. They quit riding it after a few months and it sits in the garage till they decide to sell it
2. They upgrade to a much nicer bike after a year or two and sell the old entry level bike

Do you have a buddy that already knows a decent bit about mtn bikes that could help you look at a used one? Look for somebody's couple year old $600 -$900 bike that is now $200 to $300 used and buy that. You are going to go through the same two options I just posted so there isn't a lot of reasons to blow a lot of money on a first bike. Don't waste money upgrading anything. Just figure out if you are a 1 or a 2 and save that cash hopefully for a 2 . At 6 foot tall a 19" or Large frame is the most likely size you want.

Last edited by Canker; 09-08-16 at 01:01 PM.
Canker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-16, 09:44 AM   #14
sahil687
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Thank you everyone for your replies! I have decided to try out a few bikes by renting them out over the weekend just to find out how serious I am about mountain biking. If I enjoy it, it will make sense for me to invest on a good bike without feeling guilty. I will keep you guys posted. Thanks again for all your help. There were few great advice that I will look to if I decide to buy one.
sahil687 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-16, 12:54 PM   #15
hig4s
Senior Member
 
hig4s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Florida
Bikes: Giant Stance, Wife has Liv Cypress, son has Motobecane HT529 daughter has my 20 year old Huffy
Posts: 514
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
If you put the general area you are in people could let you know when and where there are MB festivals where you could test several brands.
hig4s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-16, 02:22 AM   #16
Rainrunner
Newbie
 
Rainrunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Store managers will tell anything for you to spend more. And it's only up to you what bike to buy.There are a lot of mountain bikes that are under 600$. Search the net to find the best mountain bikes http://bestadviser.net/mountain-bike...othing-review/ and then you'll know what to look for and what to try. But also don't forget to buy all the equipment. Hope you'll find what you want! Good luck with that!
Rainrunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-16, 11:39 AM   #17
ToddSantora
Banned.
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
My 2 cents: I am building my own K2 Razorback with Fox rear shock. There are 2 of these bikes fully built on ebay for less then 600.00 with nice quality parts on them. I would go that rout for sure. They are excellent frames and very heavy duty but light!
My opinion is bikes these days are WAYYYYY over priced...........
ToddSantora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-16, 10:05 AM   #18
gsa103
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SF Bay Area
Bikes: Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)
Posts: 4,076
Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 596 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddSantora View Post
My 2 cents: I am building my own K2 Razorback with Fox rear shock. There are 2 of these bikes fully built on ebay for less then 600.00 with nice quality parts on them. I would go that rout for sure. They are excellent frames and very heavy duty but light!
My opinion is bikes these days are WAYYYYY over priced...........
Used is a good option if you're mechanically inclined. In general, used bikes will likely need a fair bit of tune-up, especially 10+ year old models. I'm currently going through that process with my Yeti, it needs new wheel bearings, pivot maintenance, and had the fork rebuilt last year. That can add considerably to the cost.

For beginners, bike shop support can be very handy. I agree most tune-ups are pretty basic, but many things really benefit from specialized tools. If nothing else, a good bike shop can steer someone towards the correct bike for their needs/budget.

One comment on Suntour forks. Yes, the basic forks are pretty bad. Suntour has an excellent upgrade program where you can trade up to a higher end model at a significant discount. That makes upgrading a basic XCT to and Epicon or XCR Air pretty attractive. The XCR Air is a quality fork, and certainly worth trying.
gsa103 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:17 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION