Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Mountain Biking
Reload this Page >

Noob ?: What are quick, steep down and ups called?

Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

Noob ?: What are quick, steep down and ups called?

Old 10-19-17, 01:19 PM
  #1  
Alan Corcoran
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Alan Corcoran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: So Cal
Posts: 15

Bikes: Specialized Camber 650b

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Noob ?: What are quick, steep down and ups called?

My apologies if this has been covered elsewhere. I am a MTB novice - about 18 rides so far on my new suspension bike. I frequently encounter short sharp drops, sometimes into sand or pebbles, followed immediately by steep climbs, sometimes with a sharp angle to boot. I am sure there must be videos etc. that cover how to best navigate these, (gearing, body position, weight shift, etc.) but... I don't know what they are called! These are the dips and climbs out of dry creeks and streams and similar. 10-25 feet down, followed almost immediately by 10-25 feet up (sometimes it looks like STRAIGHT up.) Thanks for any nomenclature info.
Alan Corcoran is offline  
Old 10-20-17, 11:39 AM
  #2  
abshipp 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Rockford IL
Posts: 344

Bikes: 1977 Schwinn Super Le Tour 12.2 Chrome, 1981 Trek 716, 1986 Schwinn Passage Single Speed, 2010 Banshee Paradox, Velo Orange Polyvalent MKIII

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Welcome to the forum!

Not sure if I have ever thought about what to call them, but I experience the same stuff where I ride.

I would just search for videos of climbing short steep hills, surely you will be able to find something!

For me, the most important thing that I do is to get myself in the appropriate gear to climb the upcoming hill. There aren't a lot of things more frustrating than being in too tall of a gear and stalling out mid climb.

Prior to the descent, I shift into a much easier gear -- maybe 3 or more cogs on the rear. Going down, keep your weight back over your rear wheel on the descent, and then transfer your weight forward into your climbing position at the start of the hill.

Hope that helped, the most important thing for me is just to get in the correct gear ratio!
abshipp is offline  
Old 10-20-17, 11:47 AM
  #3  
Nooner
If you brake you dont win
 
Nooner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Inland Empire
Posts: 103

Bikes: Santa Cruz Bronson, Trek Remedy 9.8, Cervelo S3, Kona Big Honzo, Cannondale R500, DiamondBack Apex, one storage unit my wife knows nothing about, and one ball crushing unicycle for kicks

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Aside from proper gearing, "scissoring" helps when tackling steep climbs and technical drops.
Nooner is offline  
Old 10-22-17, 10:19 AM
  #4  
DMC707
Senior Member
 
DMC707's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Oklahoma City
Posts: 3,388

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 694 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
short, sharp and steep --- I tend to keep it in tall gear and build up as much speed as possible and pound up the opposite side using as much momentum as I can

-- if I am in a small gear , I lose momentum at the bottom of the creek bed and wind up having to spin up in a tiny gear

If the descent is too dangerous to big-ring it though (rocks, tree roots, direction changes midway down etc) , you may have to utilize the strategy of freewheeling down it in a small gear and spinning up the opposite side - stay seated and try to keep weight on the rear wheel to keep from spinning out , while at the same time keep your body kind of low to keep the front end on the ground
DMC707 is offline  
Old 10-22-17, 01:06 PM
  #5  
JonathanGennick 
Senior Member
 
JonathanGennick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Munising, Michigan, USA
Posts: 3,985

Bikes: Priority 600, Priority Continuum, Devinci Dexter

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 632 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Alan Corcoran View Post
...I frequently encounter short sharp drops, sometimes into sand or pebbles, followed immediately by steep climbs, sometimes with a sharp angle to boot. ... but... I don't know what they are called!
I've heard the term "compression dip" in the world of cross-country skiing. We have numerous such dips on our local mountain-bike trail. I try to carry speed into them, and then stand o the pedals to power my way out the other side. Momentum and standing usually do the job for me, but there are one or two where I need to downshift because the climb out is longer and steeper than I can power through by standing. I'll usually make my downshift and dump a bunch of gears just as I'm starting the uphill climb, pedaling lightly while losing some momentum to allow the shift to take place. It's all in the timing, and you get better with practice.
JonathanGennick is online now  
Old 10-22-17, 08:10 PM
  #6  
Alan Corcoran
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Alan Corcoran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: So Cal
Posts: 15

Bikes: Specialized Camber 650b

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for feedback. I'm okay on short steep climb technique (I kind of scrunch down, chest to bars, chin out, slide a teensy bit forward and grind away with my elderly stick limbs.) Seems to get me over the 15-40 footers without the rear tire getting loose - although I am typically completely gassed at the crest. I'm also okay on the short steep drops. (slide back a little on saddle, extend arms, mostly roll 'em straight down.) It's the combination that is tricky, especially with the sand. I can only make it through 10-12 feet of sand, and that's with a little luck and absolutely no shifting. I started out "pre-shifting" to a low gear (well, the lowest, usually) prior to dropping and then just waiting until I started slowing down on the other side of the banks to pedal. The drawback to this is you sort of waste the momentum of the downhill and have to grunt out nearly all of the uphill. On flatter approaches, I've been getting a little more aggressive, leaving it in high gear and pedaling before a furious downshift as I hit the hill. Thing is, you really can't do that on the crossing the little sand canyons.
Alan Corcoran is offline  
Old 10-24-17, 02:20 AM
  #7  
bikeme
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sunny so. cal.
Posts: 712
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 1 Post
Gravity Cavities as my friends call them. Smaller ones that compress you hard are called Gravity-Outs or G-Outs.
bikeme is offline  
Old 10-25-17, 08:33 AM
  #8  
Gallo
Senior Member
 
Gallo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: San Diego CA
Posts: 765

Bikes: 2008 Wilier Motorolio Specialized Stumpjumper Hardtail 1986 Paramount 2014 Pivot Mach 429c

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Alan Corcoran View Post
Thanks for feedback. I'm okay on short steep climb technique (I kind of scrunch down, chest to bars, chin out, slide a teensy bit forward and grind away with my elderly stick limbs.) Seems to get me over the 15-40 footers without the rear tire getting loose - although I am typically completely gassed at the crest. I'm also okay on the short steep drops. (slide back a little on saddle, extend arms, mostly roll 'em straight down.) It's the combination that is tricky, especially with the sand. I can only make it through 10-12 feet of sand, and that's with a little luck and absolutely no shifting. I started out "pre-shifting" to a low gear (well, the lowest, usually) prior to dropping and then just waiting until I started slowing down on the other side of the banks to pedal. The drawback to this is you sort of waste the momentum of the downhill and have to grunt out nearly all of the uphill. On flatter approaches, I've been getting a little more aggressive, leaving it in high gear and pedaling before a furious downshift as I hit the hill. Thing is, you really can't do that on the crossing the little sand canyons.
Sounds like you are doing well and while new are riding above beginner . If you do not have a dropper post you might want to think about one They are useful in our canyons in socal. Sand if in the right gear you can keep momentum by pedaling but must keep your bars straight. normally a tall gear works best with easy strokes until mo is lost. I think vernaculars and terms are not always universal. I like the compression dip and gravity cavity even more. If I were describing it would be a quick drop in into a creek bed and a mean little stinger on the way out
Gallo is offline  
Old 11-05-17, 08:29 AM
  #9  
Bendopolo
Bendo
 
Bendopolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Anaheim
Posts: 241

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale Road..Firestone Beach Cruiser 2009 Cannondale Caffeine 29er SS Cannondale M300 SS

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Steep drops and rises

“Stingers”

Last edited by Bendopolo; 11-06-17 at 09:29 AM.
Bendopolo is offline  
Old 11-06-17, 01:25 PM
  #10  
Mountain Mitch
Senior Member
 
Mountain Mitch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Back-of-beyond, Kootenays, BC
Posts: 579

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix Expert Road and Specialized Stump Jumper FS Mountain; De Vinci Caribou touring, Intense Tracer T275c

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Bumps or moguls.
Mountain Mitch is offline  
Old 12-03-17, 09:13 PM
  #11  
trailgumby
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The poms call them "bomb holes" and the Aussies call them "gullies". Depending on how big and steep they, often a little pop before the lip, timed so that both tyres are grounded on the downslope when I land so I can use it to pump for speed. You want to avoid getting air and landing on the flat at the bottom or (worse) into the face of the upslope.

Out of the saddle on the downslope so the bike can move about forward and back beneath you, aiming to keep your centre of gravity over the bottom bracket. Experience will tell you what gear to select for the exit. If you've pumped enough speed out of the entry you may not even need to pedal on the exit, but be prepared just in case.

trailgumby is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.