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Old 11-09-17, 03:37 PM   #26
Kapusta
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Originally Posted by u235 View Post
At lower speeds that bike is fine, he's not going airborne, racing, or doing downhill videos for youtube or competition. I rode a crappy hybrid on MTB and singletrack for years and with touring tires. People ride CX bikes on MTB and single track and they have no suspension, skinnier tires and the total different riding position which you can't lean back if you want to still reach the brakes plus drop bars that move with every ditch and rock. No doubt a better bike is better but that bike is not out of place on MTB trails. There's a difference in I don't feel comfortable flying down the hill and keeping up with everyone compared to I don't feel comfortable even going down the hill.
What you or I or anyone else can ride is utterly beside the point and of no use to the OP, as we are not the ones posting about having a lack of confidence on rough sections.

A more capable and stable bike will give a rider more control and confidence. I thought this was obvious.

Last edited by Kapusta; 11-09-17 at 03:45 PM.
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Old 11-09-17, 06:30 PM   #27
Romyan
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Totally inappropriate tires (the ones you have are better than the stock ones, but still not appropriate).
Yeah just searched up the tires, mine are a different spec with more traction. I've mountain biked on other bikes also. Problem is, that I don't have money...
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Old 11-10-17, 12:31 PM   #28
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One thing to do to help, is practice you low speed skills. Track stands, hopping the bike sideways (just a little one tire at a time), going over small to medium sized obstacles very slowly. For me practicing good bike control on flat ground at very slow speeds helps with almost everything.
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Old 11-10-17, 12:34 PM   #29
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Well, right there is probably your biggest problem. Wrong tool for the job. That is not a mountain bike. It is a hybrid designed for a mix of urban pavements, dirt roads, and some mild bike paths. A really good all-purpose bike, from what I understand, but NOT intended for actual mountain biking. Totally inappropriate tires (the ones you have are better than the stock ones, but still not appropriate), steep geometry, a suspension fork not up to the job, narrow bars.....

I'd be nervous riding rough/loose single track on that bike, too.

Get an actual mountain bike if you want to give mountain biking a try. Does not need to be an expensive one, just something designed specifically for mountain biking. In the specialized lineup, that would be something like the Rockhopper if you are on a budget.

A real mountain bike will feel much more under control, stable and easy to ride on rough trail sections.

Good luck.
Plus like twenty. The bike you are riding is not fit especially for the trails here in Southern California. I saw you say you are lacking money and I can appreciate that. Used bikes are available that would be worlds better than that bike on the trail. It can be ridden but no with real confidence for a beginner. you need a good front shock and MTB specific geometry good tires especially up front
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Old 11-10-17, 06:39 PM   #30
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I just went MTBing on a more easier trail, had fun.
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Old 11-10-17, 07:52 PM   #31
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I just went MTBing on a more easier trail, had fun.
Good to hear.
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Old 11-11-17, 12:55 AM   #32
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Lower saddle, weight over BB. Remember "heavy feet/loose hands" Let the bike move under you. Get off the saddle. Be "loose"...leg your legs and arms work as suspension. You are "riding" the bike, not "driving" it and hanging on for dear life. Did I mention GET OFF THE SADDLE. use the saddle to make micro movements with your thighs...Unless you are on flat ground or climbing an easy grade, you should not be "sitting"
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Old 11-12-17, 06:34 AM   #33
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Lower saddle, weight over BB. Remember "heavy feet/loose hands" Let the bike move under you. Get off the saddle. Be "loose"...leg your legs and arms work as suspension. You are "riding" the bike, not "driving" it and hanging on for dear life. Did I mention GET OFF THE SADDLE. use the saddle to make micro movements with your thighs...Unless you are on flat ground or climbing an easy grade, you should not be "sitting"
This.* The guy who used to love mtbing who recommended otherwise is not you friend.
*Although you certainly can sit down on a steep climb and will need to do so to maintain traction on those tires.

I ride singletrack on a cyclocross bike, but I wouldn't recommend that you do something similar and ride the Crosstrail on anything but the easiest trails you can find. Save a few hundred dollars and buy a used hardtail with a 100+mm fork, wider bars, and knobby tires, especially the tires. In the loose Southern California sand, you'll need some good, wide, knobbies to keep the bike upright and tracking straight. This Fall, somebody "improved" the bottom of a gravel road where I regularly ride my CX bike, and my 40mm knobby Nanos didn't stand a chance the first time I flew into the sandy section. Once I saw it coming, I was scared, too, because I suddenly was on the wrong tool for the job, traveling at speed. As soon as you can afford it, find a better tool.

Last edited by ATPAH; 11-12-17 at 09:12 AM.
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Old 11-14-17, 07:25 AM   #34
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Crash. Survive. Get back up and do it again. It gets easier.
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Old 11-14-17, 02:55 PM   #35
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GENERALLY SPEAKING: Mountain bike crashes are more frequent, but less severe than road crashes. Is that encouraging?
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Old 11-14-17, 04:39 PM   #36
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Stop watching videos of guys skittering down goat trails on cliffs would be one thing, that's crazy stuff for Joe Biker.
This is easier said than done, watching singletracksampler, 'seths bike hacks' and 'skills with phil' started for me as a way to improve but man I just wanna shred those crazy trails now, takes all my resolve to know that's way beyond me
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Old 11-20-17, 09:09 PM   #37
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Somehow, whenever I go MTBing I get scared of things such as loose ground, downhills, rocky terrain and such. Is there I can do to not get scared or less scared :|
Please don't roast me , just a roadie trying to MTB.
This sounds very embarrassing...
Can you get some off road motorcycle experience?
They tend to shrug off many of those things you see as scarey and are very confidence inspiring.
Actually I think all motorbike road riders should learn on dirtbikes.

That experience will help with the comfort level to know that a little loss of control is ok. Many times hanging on, avoiding obstacle fixation and letting the bike take you through will do it. Also wear enough gear to make fall downs fun.
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Old 11-23-17, 11:19 PM   #38
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Drop your tyre pressures and consider going tubeless. I typically run 20psi front and 25psi rear on my XC bike @85kg kitted up with an 11kg XC dually. Dramatically improves comfort and control. You may pinch flat. Go tubeless if that happens.

I arrived at those pressures by dropping in 2psi increments, and then going back up to the previous setting once I got some tyre squirm.
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