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Sundeal M7-SL...missing something?

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Sundeal M7-SL...missing something?

Old 05-14-18, 02:15 PM
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fishboat
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Sundeal M7-SL...missing something?

I'm a long-term (40 yrs) roadie, but my GF and I will be visiting some areas that have fun MTB trails. We'll likely stick with intermediate level or less..we're both ... ahh..more mature in age. I don't anticipate any gnarly runs downhill, going airborne, or riding a fence on a sharp curve.

My knowledge is somewhat limited on MTB's..though I've been doing a fair bit of research. I'm looking for a bike for my GF(she rides a roadbike also and does quite well). I'm thinking a front suspension hardtail would be a good match for her & the trails we'll ride. She's ridden several MTBs, and likes a Trek Marlin 7 & X-Cal 7 in 15.5" the best in terms of fit.

I'm aware of the spring-coil vs air shock fork differences. While I'm willing to go with a pricier bike having an air-shock fork, I don't think it'll be necessary.

I've run across the Sundeal M7-SL. Looking at the 15" frame geometry, it's very similar to the Marlin 7 that fits well.

https://www.randombikeparts.com/coll...10s-yellow-new



SPECIFICATIONS:
  • Brand: Sundeal
  • Model: M7-SL
  • Frame size: 15"
  • Color: Blaze Yellow
  • Weight: 28.5lbs (Size 17")
  • Condition: New in box
COMPONENTS:
  • Frame: Tig Welded 6061 Aluminum, waterbotle mount internal shift cable routing, tapered headtube
  • Fork: Rock Shox XC28 TK - see note below on fork color
    • 1-1/8"Straight
    • Pre-load adjustment
    • Travel: 100mm
    • Remote lockout
    • Type: Coil (Medium)
  • Rims: Sundeal Alloy, 26", 26mm width (outer), Double Wall, , Schrader valve drilling, Clincher - tubed
  • Headset: Unbranded, semi-integrated, internal style. Note: It uses a 1-1/2"to 1-1/8" crown race adapter
  • Hubs: Shimano RM33, Centerlock rotor compatible
  • Tires: Kenda Small Block 8, Clincher - tubed, Wire Bead, 26 x 2.10", 30-80PSI
  • Shifters: Shimano Deore, SL-M610 3 x 10 speed Dynasys
  • Front derailleur: Shimano Deore, FD-M610
  • Rear derailleur: Shimano SLX, RD-M670 Dynasys
  • Handlebar: Sundeal 6061 alloy, 620mm
  • Cranks: Shimano Deore FC-M610, 170mm, 42/32/24T
  • Cassette: Shimano, CS-HG50-10, 11-36T
  • Pedals: None
  • Chain: KMC XXSP
  • Bottom bracket: Shimano Hollowech II
  • Spokes: black coated with brass nipples
  • Schrader Valves
  • Stem: Sundeal Alloy, 90mm
  • Saddle: Sundeal
  • Seatpost: Sundeal Alloy
  • Seatpost clamp: Alloy
  • Brakes: SRAM Avid hydraulic disc
  • Rotors: Shimano SM-RT20-M (180mm front), SM-RT20-S (160mm rear)
  • Grips: Pro-Palm Lock on
I see it's a house-brand bike from Ideal (frame mfger). Looking at the component package vs the Trek Marlin 7, and a couple of comparable Giant and Specialized models, it seems to be quite a deal as Trek/Giant/Spec don't get into Deore components until 2-3 levels above the Marlin 7 price-point. The Deore-level spec'd "big three" bikes will have a better fork, but they'll also be priced 2-3x that of the Sundeal.

So...what am I missing..anything? The Sundeal has an entry, though well used, Rock Shox XC28 TK fork. The bike has a tapered (1.5" to 1.125") head tube, so if a replacement fork is needed a few years down the road I should be able to fit an air-shock fork on it and still have a decent frame and Deore component bike in the end...for much less invested than in, say, an X-Cal 8. Of course, it's entirely possible that no replacement fork will ever be needed...given our use.

Anyone see any major issues as an entry-level MTB?

edit..Oh, and I'm aware it's a 26 in wheel vs 27.5 or 29..I understand the difference & I'm not worried about that. GF tried a couple 29ers..she didn't like them. There isn't much difference between a 26 and 27.5 inch wheel.

Last edited by fishboat; 05-14-18 at 02:20 PM.
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Old 05-16-18, 05:14 AM
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Speechless..must be really good or really bad.

I'd think someone here must have one or know someone who does. Seems like a good package that competes with the big three at half the price.
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Old 05-24-18, 12:31 PM
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Yeah, it's just a bit of a boat-anchor, 26" hardtaill with outdated geometry. Nothing wrong with it for the intended purpose. Going cheap because nobody can really give away 26ers anymore; and this one has little to recommend it other than an acceptable collection of components. Giant Talon 3 is in the same price class and would be a better bike.
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Old 05-25-18, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by dminor View Post
Yeah, it's just a bit of a boat-anchor, 26" hardtaill with outdated geometry. Nothing wrong with it for the intended purpose. Going cheap because nobody can really give away 26ers anymore; and this one has little to recommend it other than an acceptable collection of components. Giant Talon 3 is in the same price class and would be a better bike.
Thank you for your thoughts. Bear with me, as I'm not a mountain biker, but I'm trying to learn more about them. Below is the 2018 Talon 3 geometry along with two other 2018 Trek models she tried out. What aspects of the geometries in the new(design) bikes makes a difference vs outdated?

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Old 05-25-18, 07:09 AM
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Originally Posted by fishboat View Post
I'm aware of the spring-coil vs air shock fork differences. While I'm willing to go with a pricier bike having an air-shock fork, I don't think it'll be necessary.

Rock Shox XC28 TK fork.
Depending on your gf's weight, you might need a different coil spring in the fork.

Rockshox makes different coil springs for different weight riders.

Page 7: https://sram-cdn-pull-zone-gsdesign....rts_2016_0.pdf
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Old 05-29-18, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by fishboat View Post
Thank you for your thoughts. Bear with me, as I'm not a mountain biker, but I'm trying to learn more about them. Below is the 2018 Talon 3 geometry along with two other 2018 Trek models she tried out. What aspects of the geometries in the new(design) bikes makes a difference vs outdated?
{Nice Chart]
Most important difference IMO is head tube angle. Trail bikes are much more capable in part because they've finally adopted slacker head angles, making them much more stable at speed more confidence-inspiring in steep terrain. there are no drawbacks to this; only positives.
Also, check the difference in standover height - - another confidence-inspiring aspect, especially with shorter riders.
Stem length and handlebar width are things that can be changed on any bike BUT - - the newer bikes have been designed with the trend to shorter stems in mind; and everyone benefits from the leverage offered by wider bars.
Short chainstays on the X-Cal 7 make the bike more maneuverable for the larger wheel size (dunno if she rode the 27.5 or 29 version) and easier to weight the rear for clearing trail obstacles. if the X-Cal was a womens'-specific, all the better.

Hope that helps some.
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Old 06-03-18, 09:12 AM
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Have had the M7 (not SL) for over a year now and am very happy. Shifting and brakes work much better than I expected. Actually shifting is very smooth and brakes - smooth and quiet stops at any speed. Outa the box very little tweaking was necessary. The small block tires are excellent. I ride mostly paved and ATV trails with no problems. and much quieter on pavement and more importantly on the trainer than my old big knob tires.
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Old 06-05-18, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by cobba View Post
Depending on your gf's weight, you might need a different coil spring in the fork.

Rockshox makes different coil springs for different weight riders.

Page 7: https://sram-cdn-pull-zone-gsdesign....rts_2016_0.pdf
Thanks for the link cobba..She would need a softer spring than the medium that would come with the bike. The trick is finding one, or a suitable substitute.
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Old 06-05-18, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by dminor View Post
Most important difference IMO is head tube angle. Trail bikes are much more capable in part because they've finally adopted slacker head angles, making them much more stable at speed more confidence-inspiring in steep terrain. there are no drawbacks to this; only positives.
Also, check the difference in standover height - - another confidence-inspiring aspect, especially with shorter riders.
Stem length and handlebar width are things that can be changed on any bike BUT - - the newer bikes have been designed with the trend to shorter stems in mind; and everyone benefits from the leverage offered by wider bars.
Short chainstays on the X-Cal 7 make the bike more maneuverable for the larger wheel size (dunno if she rode the 27.5 or 29 version) and easier to weight the rear for clearing trail obstacles. if the X-Cal was a womens'-specific, all the better.

Hope that helps some.
Actually it does help me understand things a bit better. Thanks for taking the time to compare/contrast the geometries.
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Old 06-05-18, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by ctpres View Post
Have had the M7 (not SL) for over a year now and am very happy. Shifting and brakes work much better than I expected. Actually shifting is very smooth and brakes - smooth and quiet stops at any speed. Outa the box very little tweaking was necessary. The small block tires are excellent. I ride mostly paved and ATV trails with no problems. and much quieter on pavement and more importantly on the trainer than my old big knob tires.
I've run across a couple people that have the SL and they both give the bike two enthusiastic thumbs up. Seems to be your observation also. Cool. Thank you for offering some thoughts.
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Old 06-07-18, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by fishboat View Post
Thank you for your thoughts. Bear with me, as I'm not a mountain biker, but I'm trying to learn more about them. Below is the 2018 Talon 3 geometry along with two other 2018 Trek models she tried out. What aspects of the geometries in the new(design) bikes makes a difference vs outdated?

To echo what has been said, the main differences that I see are
1- the slacker head angle on the Talon
2- the wide bar/short stem combo on the talon.

Both of these things are reflecting current trends. And FWIW I personally prefer them.

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