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-   -   Pedal Recommendations? (https://www.bikeforums.net/mountain-biking/1167444-pedal-recommendations.html)

Bluebatmobile 03-01-19 03:04 PM

Pedal Recommendations?
 
Just picked a new Look 927 full suspension bike. Its been a good 17 years since my last purchase, a Cannondale Raven, with Ritchey Logic pedals! Your input is appreciated ;).

B@tô

MAK 03-01-19 11:18 PM

I like the Shimano m647. I can clip in or, when needed, can ride unclipped because the platform gives me a comfortable surface.

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f5aee60e39.jpg

Stormsedge 03-02-19 04:41 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Lately, I've been using flats on my MTB. Purchased Pedaling Innovations Catalyst pedals for my new FS.

Steve B. 03-02-19 10:09 AM

I use lower end Shimano SPD pedals on a number of bikes, 520 or 540 series, whichever was on sale at Nashbar at the time. I typically paid about $25 a pair. I assume there's a difference between the more expensive XTR series and lower levels, likely titanium spindles and weight, maybe better bearings, but nothing I would notice. I also have a pair of Shimano PD-M424, which are dual sided SPD with a dual sided rubber platform to allow street shoes to be worn. Heavy but really functional for my tourer/commuter

I've been mt. biking 30 years and am in the camp of using pedals that keep the foot attached to the pedal, to avoid the foot coming off the pedal in the rough stuff. I don't quite get the pinned pedal concept and how that keeps the shoe on the pedal when you are getting bounced around. People like them though.

2cam16 03-02-19 06:05 PM


Originally Posted by Steve B. (Post 20818947)

I've been mt. biking 30 years and am in the camp of using pedals that keep the foot attached to the pedal, to avoid the foot coming off the pedal in the rough stuff. I don't quite get the pinned pedal concept and how that keeps the shoe on the pedal when you are getting bounced around. People like them though.

I just switched over to flats a year ago after all these decades on spd's and I feel "safer". I don't have that thought in the back of my mind about unclipping while crashing. Control wise, definitely not as good as being clipped-in but you get used to it and figure it out.
I still have spd's though on most of my mtb's but they hardly get ridden.

Steve B. 03-02-19 07:59 PM


Originally Posted by 2cam16 (Post 20819528)
. Control wise, definitely not as good as being clipped-in but you get used to it and figure it out.
.

So then, why not use clipless ?

I’m actually curious why the love of pinned pedals. I think they started with DH mt. bikes ?


2cam16 03-02-19 08:03 PM


Originally Posted by Steve B. (Post 20819650)


So then, why not use clipless ?

Iím actually curious why the love of pinned pedals. I think they started with DH mt. bikes ?


Because this:

Originally Posted by 2cam16 (Post 20819528)
I just switched over to flats a year ago after all these decades on spd's and I feel "safer". I don't have that thought in the back of my mind about unclipping while crashing.


Dave Mayer 03-02-19 08:33 PM

At the Co-op, I just finished taking apart and reassembling a set of Shimano m520 pedals. Someone had stripped the release tension bolts, and I replaced them, as well as relubing the internals. Now good for another 5,000 miles!

These are one of the great bargains in cycling. Great retention and release, hard to kill, and relatively resistant to mud. Plus you can replace/service almost everything on them.

BTW: I used (Version 2) Ritchey pedals for many years. The Richey 2-bolt cleats superficially look like Shimano cleats, but they are dangerously incompatible. When you clip in, you either cannot stay in, or release out, I cannot remember which; in any case - scary...

cormacf 03-02-19 11:23 PM

I have three pairs of Specialized Bennies on three different bikes (full-time on the commuter, and I swap M8020 XT Trail pedals on the hardtail and roadie when I feel like clipping in). For clipless, I can't say enough good things about the whole Shimano line. I've had 520/540s before, and they've been super-reliable. The 8020s are essentially the same pedal with more of a frame to support your foot if you miss a clip or are really bearing down hard. I've replaced Ultegra road pedals with them on my roadie, because it's easier to clip in/out, I can wear MTB shoes on brevets (much nicer for walking), and the frames seem to keep hot spots at bay, on anything up to 220 miles so far.

mikeng64 03-03-19 12:23 AM

I've been pedaling with Crankbrothers Doubleshot II on my FS and have been happy with them. The clip side is not the easiest to clip in (maybe I need to break them in some more or I need to add more lubrication). But I love that the other side is big and flat.

Maelstrom 03-03-19 07:03 AM


Originally Posted by Stormsedge (Post 20818691)
Lately, I've been using flats on my MTB. Purchased Pedaling Innovations Catalyst pedals for my new FS.

Yep... yep and yep... cannot recommend these enough. They are literally amazing.

Maelstrom 03-03-19 07:11 AM


Originally Posted by 2cam16 (Post 20819528)
I just switched over to flats a year ago after all these decades on spd's and I feel "safer". I don't have that thought in the back of my mind about unclipping while crashing. Control wise, definitely not as good as being clipped-in but you get used to it and figure it out.
I still have spd's though on most of my mtb's but they hardly get ridden.

I am not sure I agree with the "not as good" statement. lifelong flat pedaller, and yes ex dhiller, and I have no problems with control at speed, or in rough stuff and I ride in almost every condition imaginable. Heck, I ride mid winter on the north shore. Can't get much worse than that for conditions. You do need really good ankle mobility to make flats work really well though. That is extra important :)... check out Ryan Leeches video (which may not be free... O_o) for converting from clips to flats. Will give you a lot of great tips for ensuring your ride is even better than in clips.

I find I have better control (as in, more skilled) and I am far safer since I can bail. The adjustment is in how and where your feet are positioned for each type of terrain. Jumping vs climbing vs descending. In fact, since I can maneuver for each I would think that's better for my knees and ankles, but that's really just me guessing since I can't maintain any single position for long with aches and pain... hahaha

PaulRivers 03-03-19 03:52 PM


Originally Posted by 2cam16 (Post 20819528)
I just switched over to flats a year ago after all these decades on spd's and I feel "safer". I don't have that thought in the back of my mind about unclipping while crashing. Control wise, definitely not as good as being clipped-in but you get used to it and figure it out.
I still have spd's though on most of my mtb's but they hardly get ridden.

Are you using Five Ten shoes? I started with Chrome shoes but they slid around on the pedal a bit sometimes. Then I tried Five Tens and that completely went away. They had the same grip on the pedal as I had with clipless for down, forward, or back. Not up of course, if you pull up the shoe it will come off as you'd expect.

I also enjoy the not-on-the-bike advantages - wearing the same shoes in the car that I wear on the bike and being able to walk around on any surface with normal feeling shoes.

I felt the same way when I switched back to flats, that there was a tiny bit of thinking my brain no longer had to do now that I wasn't clipped in. Not a huge deal but it was nice.

PaulRivers 03-03-19 03:56 PM

DMR Vaults
https://i.imgur.com/0OpTeRVl.jpg

They are expensive but having tried a few pairs of flat pedals they were definitely the most comfortable for me with size 12 feet so I kept them.

Steve B. 03-03-19 04:08 PM

Pinned is a really intriguing concept.

Not sure I agree 100% with it as I can see scenarios where bumps and obstacles can cause the feet to bounce off the pedals and that would make me want to stick with clipped in.

But, the large platform for power into the crank makes sense.

Curious though, does the lack of a stiff soled shoe cause pressures in the arch ?. Could see where Plantar fasciitis might develop.

hig4s 03-03-19 07:03 PM

has anyone ever seen anyone clipped in to a motocross bike? Nuff Said.

Steve B. 03-03-19 08:47 PM


Originally Posted by hig4s (Post 20821108)
has anyone ever seen anyone clipped in to a motocross bike? Nuff Said.

All kinds of differences with a motorcross. Weight of machine, speed, suspension travel, etc.... and you’re not pedaling a motocross to keep your momentum.

I’ve had my feet come off a pedal. Ain’t pretty. As well, easier to bunny hop with clipless, though since I got older and more gravity challenged, not bunny hopping much, yuk, yuk.

Not starting a pinned vs. clipless war here. I’m certainly curious, just hard to conceive of the advantage, but I’ve 28 seasons on a mt. bike, pretty much all those on SPD, so a bit of old dog, new tricks.



2cam16 03-03-19 09:26 PM


Originally Posted by PaulRivers (Post 20820821)
Are you using Five Ten shoes? I started with Chrome shoes but they slid around on the pedal a bit sometimes. Then I tried Five Tens and that completely went away. They had the same grip on the pedal as I had with clipless for down, forward, or back. Not up of course, if you pull up the shoe it will come off as you'd expect.

I also enjoy the not-on-the-bike advantages - wearing the same shoes in the car that I wear on the bike and being able to walk around on any surface with normal feeling shoes.

I felt the same way when I switched back to flats, that there was a tiny bit of thinking my brain no longer had to do now that I wasn't clipped in. Not a huge deal but it was nice.

And therein lies one of my problems. I wish I could afford Five Tens but not at this moment so I'm still using my old Specialized mtb shoes.

hig4s 03-04-19 07:50 AM


Originally Posted by Steve B. (Post 20821278)
. . , easier to bunny hop with clipless,

Using the clips to pull the bike up is not the correct way to bunny hop. Learning to bunny hop in clipless can make it difficult to get your technique correct.

Why Flats
Again

Steve B. 03-04-19 07:55 AM


Originally Posted by hig4s (Post 20821657)
Using the clips to pull the bike up is not the correct way to bunny hop. Learning to bunny hop in clipless can make it difficult to get your technique correct.

Why Flats
Again

To get the rear wheel off the ground, you need the pedals level and to lift with the pedals ?. That's how I learned it. You do have to compress with the legs to get the power to launch the bike, but seems easier to be in clipless and be able to pull up with the feet.

But I'm not Danny MacasKill and I think he does it on flats, so obviously it can be done.

EDIT: Well being curious I watched the GMBN YouTube on how to bunny hop and apparently I've been doing it wrong for 28 years. Seems your NOT supposed to do a simultaneous pull up of the front with your arms and the rear with your clipped in feet, but instead are supposed to lean weight back to get the front wheel up, then shift forward to get the rear up.

OK, got it.

Maelstrom 03-04-19 09:32 AM


Originally Posted by Steve B. (Post 20821278)


All kinds of differences with a motorcross. Weight of machine, speed, suspension travel, etc.... and youíre not pedaling a motocross to keep your momentum.

Iíve had my feet come off a pedal. Ainít pretty. As well, easier to bunny hop with clipless, though since I got older and more gravity challenged, not bunny hopping much, yuk, yuk.

Not starting a pinned vs. clipless war here. Iím certainly curious, just hard to conceive of the advantage, but Iíve 28 seasons on a mt. bike, pretty much all those on SPD, so a bit of old dog, new tricks.



Ride whatcha ride. :)Ö

I have 20 years on flats. I have tried spds on my road bike and even switched to flats. I maneuver my feet too much I guess. :)

Darth Lefty 03-04-19 09:43 AM

It seems like the flat pedals I see most frequently are either Race Face Chester, or various Shimano like the Saint. The Chesterís come in a wide range of colors. The Shimanos look serious and the current XT comes in two platform sizes.

I like a fully molded or rubber treaded pedal better than pins even though they are not as grippy. Iíve regrown enough shin skin.

I sometimes use SPDís. I most recently installed those on my trike because it needed foot retention for safety and the big Power Straps it came with were unlikable.

snugent 03-04-19 10:26 AM

i've used time atacs on both my bmx and mountain bike for nearly 20 years now. i prefer them over spds for a few reasons. 1. there's no need to adjust the tension. one tension setting is it and it's pretty much perfect. 2. the amount of side to side float is great for when you're diving through berms and avoiding rocks, roots and trees. spds don't allow that as there's little to no float. 3. they're durable. i've had no issues with the 2 sets that i have. they're both close to 20 years old and have needed no maintenance other than a new set of cleats every few years.

Steve B. 03-04-19 11:47 AM

I love discussions like this where I learn stuff about alternatives to the way I've been doing it for 30 years.

I saw a good YouTube last night from the GCN folks where they test flats and clipless on a road bike on a inclined roller. The flats were more efficient, which seemed to surprise them.


Bluebatmobile 03-04-19 02:47 PM

Wow! I've really been out of the loop! So it seems quite a few of you are using flats. Flats meaning non clipless pedals? What are pinned pedals?

B@t™


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