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Which frame should I build?

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Which frame should I build?

Old 06-14-20, 10:16 AM
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Kriscarr
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Which frame should I build?

So Ive been thing of resurrecting one of my old mountain bikes. Issue is that Im not sure which one to build. One is a early 90's Norco Pinnacle and the other is a mid 90's Specialized Stump jumper. Theyve both been sitting outside for years. The specialized was ridden most recently but I discovered that somehow the fork snapped off at the wheel. Both wolud require significant work but I have a certain sentimental attachment to both bikes which is why they are both still in my yard. So my question is, which one would be more worthy of building up? I live in Northern B.C and there are endless trails everywhere. My buddies got me into the downhill scene a few years back but after I crashed my motorcycle and spent 6 months recovering I decided to back to the trails.
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Old 06-16-20, 10:22 AM
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eshew
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The stumpy is the higher end bike. So that would be my choice. If they've been outside rusting though it might be a good idea to look on craigslist for a donor bike. You might find it's better than what you have condition wise. Not sure if the stumpy is steel or aluminum, if it's steel & has been outside it might not be long for this world depending on if it's been rusting inside the tubes.
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Old 06-16-20, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by eshew View Post
The stumpy is the higher end bike. So that would be my choice. If they've been outside rusting though it might be a good idea to look on craigslist for a donor bike. You might find it's better than what you have condition wise. Not sure if the stumpy is steel or aluminum, if it's steel & has been outside it might not be long for this world depending on if it's been rusting inside the tubes.
They are both aluminum. Im leaning towards the stumpy also. I have a autobody shop in my back yard so cleaning up rust is second nature to me. Wonder what would be a decently modern fork that would fit?
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Old 06-16-20, 12:20 PM
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You asked this in the mountain biking forum...So mountain bike forks, of course

Seriously though, what forks depends on what headset your bike will accept. If it'll only accept a 1 inch, then I would not bother proceeding further if the goal is to actually go to the local mountain bike park. As an around town bike though, carry on with 1 inch rigid forks as much as your heart desires.

If it'll accept a 1&⅛ headset, then threadless & air/oil shock is definitely the way to go IMO. Rockshox & Fox both make forks that'll work just dandy & give the option of disc brakes & or various suspension travel.

I like the Rockshox Recon Silver. Studs for linear pull brakes (you would need a linear pull, a.k.a mountain brake lever), disc studs for disc brakes. You would need a road caliper to match the canti levers your bike probably has. Or again, a different lever to match a mountain caliper. (The important thing in either case is to match caliper/lever type.) And the Recon can be configured for 80, 100, or 120mm of travel by swapping around internal spacers when disassembled for overhaul.

You would also need some headset spacers & a stem to use your old handlebars if swapping from 1&⅛ threaded quill.

I did a similar swap with my Trek 6500ZX. Totally worth it against the cost of a new bike.

I would not bother with a spring fork. But that's just me. A Manitou isn't the most terrible fork in the world, if you go that route.

Last edited by base2; 06-16-20 at 12:31 PM.
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