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Want to convert hybrid to hard tail

Old 12-21-22, 11:39 PM
  #1  
Ryan_M
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Want to convert hybrid to hard tail

So the short of it, I have two hybids. One is more for touring and gets used a lot, the other (although better) never gets any use especially now that I have a road bike. Id like to try my hand at some beginner MTB stuff so thought Id convert the unused hybrid to a hard tail MTB. If I get more serious into it Ill likely build a full suspension bike, but Im sure the hard tail will still have its uses. Anyway Id like some advice on how to shuffle around parts, what I need to change, and what Id need to get. Ill list the important parts below



Touring hybrid:

- Started life as a Giant Roam but the frame and brakes are the only original parts remaining
- Rigid carbon fork
- M5100 crank 36/26T
- M8000 FD
- M5120 RD
- M8000 11-42 cassette
- M5100 shifters
- MT200 brakes
- Wheels are DT350 hubs (32H) 100/135mm QR w/29 DT XR-361 rims



Other hybrid (to become a hard tail):

- OG Evkin CF-052 frame and mating rigid carbon fork
- M8000 crank 38/26T
- M8000 FD
- M8000 RD
- HG-800 11-34 cassette
- M8000 shifters
- M6000 brakes
- Wheels are DT240 (28H) 100/142mm TA w/29 DT XR-361 rims



What I was thinking:
1.) Swap drivetrains
2.) Replace fork with suspension fork
3.) Seems swapping wheels due to spoke counts would also be a good thing to do but the 350 hubs has the 18T clutch (which Id MUCH rather have on the touring bike) and the 240s have a 36T clutch. Not sure if I can put the 18T bits in the 240 hubs and vice versa. Also Im sure a different rim would be prudent for MTB use.

Id appreciate any input on how to proceed.
Thanks!!
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Old 12-22-22, 04:04 AM
  #2  
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I'd swap cassettes and probably chains. The OG Evkin CF-052 looks to be marketed as a MTB frame, so add mtb tires and see how you like dirt. If you start to get the bug, consider the suspension fork

The hubs and spoke count are fine on both wheels for mountain biking. I'd put the wider rim on the MTB.
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Old 12-22-22, 09:29 AM
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I'll just add that when it does come time to go fork hunting you have a non-boost setup. Pretty much all new decent forks these days are boost but you can make your current non-boost hub work with boost.
https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...nt=17761372869
That one requires you to re-dish the wheel so there is also a quick and dirty option that doesn't.
https://www.amazon.com/Front-Boost-C...Q3Y?th=1&psc=1
Downside to that kit is every time you take your front wheel off you have to be careful not to loose the spacers.

If you don't mind going used should be a lot of non-boost options out there since again everybody is boost these days. Nothing wrong with non-boost btw. Both of my current mtbs are still non-boost.
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Old 12-22-22, 10:30 AM
  #4  
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I started mtb'ing on a fully rigid mtn.bike, when it was just becoming "a thing". Maybe just put the widest tires you can fit on your hybrid, run them at low pressure, to see how you like mtb'ing. It will at least provide an insight to whether you think you might like it or not, is easily reversible, and costs little to do. Bonus--I found that learning to mtb on a fully rigid bike forced me to learn to pick better lines, so when I got my first mtb with a suspension fork, I think it made me a better rider since I was still picking (or trying to pick) the best lines. Just don't go flying down any crazy trails, since if you try this, it's not really a bike made for it.
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Old 12-22-22, 09:25 PM
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Looks like a reasonable idea. Frame and rims are MTB appropriate. Just get some decent tires. With 22.5mm width rims, I would not go bigger than (true) 2.4" wide tires.
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Old 12-23-22, 09:01 AM
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You should be able to ride beginner level mountain bike stuff on either one of those bikes. Try them as is before putting time and effort at it.

I was taking my first ride on my specialized levo a few days back and was passed and dropped by a hippie with a beer belly wearing jeans on a gravel bike on somewhat technical mountain bike trails

I’m thinking your hybrid can hold up to some abuse*. If it’s got slicks on it obviously some decent tires Would be a nice upgrade but other than that just let her rip spend one or two rides and then if you think it needs anything more from there go for it
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Old 01-08-23, 05:14 AM
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If you want to make your bike a hardtail mountain bike, you will need to do some conversions. You will first need to remove the front suspension fork and replace it with a solid fork. You will also need to add wider tires with more tread for off-road riding.

Finally, you may want to consider adding a better braking system for added safety while riding on trails.
  • Start by removing the rear suspension from your bike
  • This will give you a hard-tail MTB
  • Next, increase the tire width to accommodate more off-road riding
  • Wider tires will provide more traction and stability on rough terrain
  • You may also want to consider adding a front suspension fork to your hardtail MTB for added comfort and control while riding on rough terrain
  • Finally, make sure your bike is equipped with appropriate gearing for off-road riding
  • A higher gear ratio will be needed for climbing hills and pedaling over rough terrain

Can I Turn My Hybrid into a Gravel Bike?

Yes, you can turn your hybrid bike into a gravel bike with a few modifications. First, you'll need to swap out your tires for wider, knobbier ones that can handle off-road riding. You may also want to consider adding a suspension fork or shock absorber to help absorb bumps and jolts on uneven terrain.

Finally, you'll want to make sure your brakes are up to the task of stopping on wet and muddy surfaces. With these changes, your hybrid bike will be ready to tackle any adventure!

Are Hard Tails Good for Mountain Biking?

Mountain biking is a great way to get outdoors and explore nature. There are many different types of mountain bikes available on the market, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Hard tails are one type of mountain bike that can be good for certain types of riding.

A hard-tail mountain bike has a rigid frame with no suspension in the back. This makes them lighter weight and easier to maneuver than full-suspension mountain bikes. Hard tails can also be less expensive than full-suspension bikes because they have fewer parts.

The main downside of hard-tail mountain bikes is that they aren't as comfortable to ride on rough terrain. The lack of rear suspension means that all the bumps and shocks are felt directly through the saddle and handlebars. This can make for a jarring ride, particularly if you're not used to it.

If you're thinking about getting a hard-tail mountain bike, it's important to consider what kind of riding you'll be doing most often. If you plan on mostly riding smooth trails or fire roads, a hard tail can be a great option. But if you anticipate spending time on more technical singletrack or rockier terrain, you might want to consider a full-suspension bike instead.

Can You Turn a Hybrid Bike into a Touring Bike?

A touring bike is designed for long-distance, multi-day rides on paved surfaces. A hybrid bike combines the features of a road bike and a mountain bike, and is suitable for riding on paved roads and dirt trails. While it is possible to turn a hybrid bike into a touring bike, it is not ideal, as the geometry of the frame and the tires are not optimized for long-distance riding.

If you are planning to do any serious touring, it is better to invest in a purpose-built touring bike.

MTB to Hybrid Conversion

Mountain biking is a great way to get exercise and enjoy the outdoors, but it can be tough on your body. If you're looking for a more comfortable ride, consider converting your mountain bike to a hybrid. A hybrid bike is a cross between a road bike and a mountain bike.

They typically have wider tires than road bikes, but not as wide as mountain bikes. This makes them more versatile and easier to ride on different types of terrain. There are a few things you'll need to do in order to convert your mountain bike to a hybrid.

First, you'll need to replace your tires with wider ones that are suitable for both pavement and dirt trails. You may also want to invest in some new handlebars that are designed for comfort rather than speed. Finally, make sure your saddle is adjusted properly so that you're not putting unnecessary strain on your back or neck.

With just a few simple adjustments, you can turn your mountain bike into a more comfortable hybrid that's perfect for both city riding and trail exploration.
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Old 01-09-23, 03:01 PM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by TheMountBike
If you want to make your bike a hardtail mountain bike, you will need to do some conversions. You will first need to remove the front suspension fork and replace it with a solid fork. You will also need to add wider tires with more tread for off-road riding.

Finally, you may want to consider adding a better braking system for added safety while riding on trails.
  • Start by removing the rear suspension from your bike
  • This will give you a hard-tail MTB
  • Next, increase the tire width to accommodate more off-road riding
  • Wider tires will provide more traction and stability on rough terrain
  • You may also want to consider adding a front suspension fork to your hardtail MTB for added comfort and control while riding on rough terrain
  • Finally, make sure your bike is equipped with appropriate gearing for off-road riding
  • A higher gear ratio will be needed for climbing hills and pedaling over rough terrain

Can I Turn My Hybrid into a Gravel Bike?

Yes, you can turn your hybrid bike into a gravel bike with a few modifications. First, you'll need to swap out your tires for wider, knobbier ones that can handle off-road riding. You may also want to consider adding a suspension fork or shock absorber to help absorb bumps and jolts on uneven terrain.

Finally, you'll want to make sure your brakes are up to the task of stopping on wet and muddy surfaces. With these changes, your hybrid bike will be ready to tackle any adventure!

Are Hard Tails Good for Mountain Biking?

Mountain biking is a great way to get outdoors and explore nature. There are many different types of mountain bikes available on the market, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Hard tails are one type of mountain bike that can be good for certain types of riding.

A hard-tail mountain bike has a rigid frame with no suspension in the back. This makes them lighter weight and easier to maneuver than full-suspension mountain bikes. Hard tails can also be less expensive than full-suspension bikes because they have fewer parts.

The main downside of hard-tail mountain bikes is that they aren't as comfortable to ride on rough terrain. The lack of rear suspension means that all the bumps and shocks are felt directly through the saddle and handlebars. This can make for a jarring ride, particularly if you're not used to it.

If you're thinking about getting a hard-tail mountain bike, it's important to consider what kind of riding you'll be doing most often. If you plan on mostly riding smooth trails or fire roads, a hard tail can be a great option. But if you anticipate spending time on more technical singletrack or rockier terrain, you might want to consider a full-suspension bike instead.

Can You Turn a Hybrid Bike into a Touring Bike?

A touring bike is designed for long-distance, multi-day rides on paved surfaces. A hybrid bike combines the features of a road bike and a mountain bike, and is suitable for riding on paved roads and dirt trails. While it is possible to turn a hybrid bike into a touring bike, it is not ideal, as the geometry of the frame and the tires are not optimized for long-distance riding.

If you are planning to do any serious touring, it is better to invest in a purpose-built touring bike.

MTB to Hybrid Conversion

Mountain biking is a great way to get exercise and enjoy the outdoors, but it can be tough on your body. If you're looking for a more comfortable ride, consider converting your mountain bike to a hybrid. A hybrid bike is a cross between a road bike and a mountain bike.

They typically have wider tires than road bikes, but not as wide as mountain bikes. This makes them more versatile and easier to ride on different types of terrain. There are a few things you'll need to do in order to convert your mountain bike to a hybrid.

First, you'll need to replace your tires with wider ones that are suitable for both pavement and dirt trails. You may also want to invest in some new handlebars that are designed for comfort rather than speed. Finally, make sure your saddle is adjusted properly so that you're not putting unnecessary strain on your back or neck.

With just a few simple adjustments, you can turn your mountain bike into a more comfortable hybrid that's perfect for both city riding and trail exploration.
This is what happens when Chat GPT is set loose.
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Old 01-11-23, 12:57 PM
  #9  
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once you start hitting tree roots & rocks you'll want higher volume tires & an entry level suspension fork. yeah even an entry level fork is better than a rigid front end
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Old 01-11-23, 11:27 PM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
This is what happens when Chat GPT is set loose.
What is Chat GPT? These posts are weird.
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Old 01-12-23, 06:48 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by big john
What is Chat GPT? These posts are weird.
Google it. Learn about it now. You are going to be interacting a lot with it in the future (well in this case its here in this thread).

ChatGPT is an extraordinarily convincing and capable chat bot.

Problem is that it can give false information just as convincingly as it does true information.

It has reduced the time cost of generating BS to near zero. And it is going to flood the web with this BS. It has already started, as evidenced my TheMountBike account.

Last edited by Kapusta; 01-12-23 at 07:47 AM.
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Old 01-12-23, 09:23 AM
  #12  
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chatbot = a computer program designed to simulate conversation with human users, especially over the internet

intriguing, I used to enjoy computer chess

actually I know I have interacted with at least one already. on a car sales website. it was awful
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Old 01-13-23, 11:58 AM
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Install the widest tires that will fit. Conversion done, go ride.
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